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Combined Heat and Power Partnership

2013 AwardsWinners of the 2013 ENERGY STAR® CHP Award


Announced in November, 2013

  • Marine Corps Logistics Base Albany for its 1.9 MW system which utilizes landfill gas to supply electricity to the base and steam to a factory employing 2,000 personnel to repair and rebuild ground combat and ground combat support equipment.
  • National Archives and Records Administration for its 150 kW system which is a key part of its commitment to meet federal energy efficiency and emissions reduction goals.

Marine Corps Logistics Base Albany Georgia

The Marine Corps Logistics Base Albany's (MCLB Albany's) highly efficient 1.9 MW combined heat and power (CHP) system is central to the base's commitment to achieve energy efficiency and pollution reduction goals, while supporting the U.S. Marine Corps' operational capabilities and saving approximately $1.3 million per year in energy costs.

Installed in 2011, the CHP system has helped the base meet federal energy reduction, renewable energy consumption, and greenhouse (GHG) emission reduction mandates. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires that at least 7.5 percent of the total annual electricity used by the federal government come from renewable energy sources, beginning in FY 2013. Executive Order (EO) 13423 and the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act require federal agencies to reduce the energy intensity of their buildings by 30 percent by FY 2015.  And in response to EO 13514, which directed federal agencies to establish GHG emission reduction targets, the Department of Defense set an ambitious goal to reduce its emissions by 34 percent by FY 2020. According to MCLB Albany, the CHP system is fundamental to the base's progress towards exceeding these goals and has put the base on track to becoming the Department of the Navy's first net-zero facility.

By using less fuel than conventional electricity and steam sources, and by using landfill gas that would otherwise be combusted unproductively ("flared"), the system avoids an estimated 10,300 tons per year of carbon pollution, equal to that from the electricity used by more than 1,200 homes.

By recovering otherwise-wasted heat from the engine exhaust, the CHP system also produces steam used by a 2,000-employee re-manufacturing plant where Marine Corps ground combat and combat support equipment is repaired and rebuilt. The CHP system also provides MCLB Albany with enhanced power reliability benefits. In the event of a grid power outage, the CHP system is capable of starting up and operating independently of the electric grid. In addition, in the case of a disruption in the landfill gas supply, the CHP system can quickly switch to natural gas.

The nearby Dougherty County Landfill is the source for the landfill gas that powers the CHP system's internal combustion engine (manufactured by GE's Jenbacher) which generates up to 20% of the base's electric demand. MCLB Albany partnered with Chevron Energy Solutions to develop the CHP system.

According to EPA's Landfill Methane Outreach Program, among the 2,430 currently open or recently closed landfills in the United States, approximately 450 are candidates for energy production with a potential capacity of 850 MW. Of those, more than 20 landfills are promising candidates for supporting CHP systems at federal facilities.

The CHP system is an excellent example of how federal agencies can use Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs) to partner with energy service companies (ESCOs) to accomplish energy savings projects without up-front capital costs. Through ESPCs, the ESCO typically pays all costs involved in installing energy-efficient equipment. The energy upgrades are paid for by a portion of the cost savings resulting from these improvements over a set term.  At the end of the ESPC, the customer owns all of the improvements and receives all of the continuing savings.

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National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) operates a highly efficient 150 kW combined heat and power (CHP) system at its National Archives Building, which houses the nation's most significant historical documents, including the U.S. Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Declaration of Independence. The CHP system is a key part of NARA's commitment to meeting energy efficiency and emissions reduction goals established by Executive Orders (EO) 13423 and 13514.

With an operating efficiency of 72 percent, the system requires approximately 24 percent less fuel than grid-supplied electricity and hot water from an on-site boiler. The system also prevents emissions of air pollutants, including an estimated 470 tons of carbon pollution annually, equal to that from the generation of electricity used by more than 50 homes.

Two Aegis Energy Services natural gas-fueled internal combustion engines generate electricity used in the building. By recovering otherwise-wasted heat from the engine exhaust, cooling system, and engine block, the system also produces all the hot water needed by the facility, and hot water not needed for conventional uses can help supply the building's dehumidification system. Documents stored and maintained at the facility are vulnerable to moisture, so dehumidification is crucial.

NARA's CHP system—developed under an energy savings performance contract (ESPC) with Ameresco—is an excellent example of how federal agencies can use ESPCs to partner with energy service companies (ESCOs) to accomplish energy savings projects without up-front capital costs. Through an ESPC, the ESCO typically pays all costs associated with installing energy-efficient equipment. During the term of the ESPC, a portion of the annual savings from the project—which are $265,000 in this case—is paid to the ESCO. At the end of the ESPC term—for this project, seven years—the customer owns all of the equipment and receives all of the continuing savings.

Based on the success of the National Archives CHP system, NARA installed a similar system at its facility in College Park, Maryland and plans to install additional CHP systems at other NARA facilities.

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Announced in February, 2013

  • Medical Area Total Energy Plant (MATEP) LP for its 46 MW CHP system which produces electricity, steam and chilled water for the Longwood Medical and Academic Area, home to five hospitals, numerous biomedical and pharmaceutical research centers and Harvard Medical School-affiliated teaching institutions.
  • Montefiore Medical Center for its 11 MW CHP system which supplies electricity and steam to the Center. During Hurricanes Irene and Sandy, the Medical Center continued to operate and accept patients from other hospitals that were forced to close.
  • NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center for its 7.5 MW CHP system which produces electricity and steam for the hospital's operations. The hospital is believed to have been the first in New York City capable of operating independently from the grid in the event of a power outage.
  • New York University (NYU) for its 12.8 MW CHP system that produces steam and electricity for its campus in lower Manhattan. The system provided uninterrupted electricity, heating, and cooling to the campus during Hurricane Sandy.
  • Texas A&M University for its 45 MW CHP system which produces electricity, space cooling, space heating, and hot water for its campus in College Station, Texas. The CHP system enabled Texas A&M's facilities to provide emergency housing for people endangered or displaced by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

Medical Area Total Energy Plant (MATEP) LP

Medical Area Total Energy Plant (MATEP) LP This award recognizes the Medical Area Total Energy Plant (MATEP) LP for the superior efficiency of its 46 MW CHP system that produces steam, chilled water, and electricity for the Longwood Medical and Academic Area (LMA).

A key driver for the development of the CHP system was to increase energy reliability by decreasing dependence on the local utility—particularly important because of the critically important missions of the medical facilities it serves. The MATEP system is designed to operate and remain fully functioning during a power outage, thus ensuring that critical operations at the hospitals and research centers served by MATEP can continue without interruption in the event of disruption to the local power grid. Located in Boston, Massachusetts, the LMA is home to five hospitals as well as numerous biomedical and pharmaceutical research centers and Harvard Medical School-affiliated teaching institutions. The LMA includes more than 1,800 patient beds and serves 103,000 inpatients and more than 2.4 million outpatients per year.

Two natural gas-fired combustion turbines equipped with heat recovery steam generators power the CHP system, producing up to 360,000 pounds of steam per hour and 24 MW of electricity. The steam is used in steam turbines to generate an additional 22 MW of electricity and also to heat water for space heating and other uses. In addition, several chillers use part of the steam output to produce chilled water for space cooling.

With an operating efficiency of 75 percent, the CHP system requires approximately 24 percent less fuel than supplying electricity from the grid and producing steam with a boiler. The system also prevents emissions of air pollutants, including an estimated 117,500 tons of CO2 emissions annually, equal to that from the generation of electricity used by more than 13,000 homes.

MATEP is owned by Morgan Stanley Infrastructure Partners and Veolia Energy North America, a partner in EPA's CHP Partnership.

The Partnership also recognizes its Partner Siemens Energy for its contributions to the success of this project.

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Montefiore Medical Center

Montefiore Medical Center This award recognizes Montefiore Medical Center for the superior efficiency of its CHP system, which produces both electricity and steam for the hospital's operations.

Montefiore's CHP system can provide uninterrupted electricity in the event of a power outage, ensuring that essential medical services and research activities are not affected by loss of grid power. The value of this energy security and reliability proved critical during Hurricanes Irene and Sandy when the Medical Center continued to operate and accept patients from other hospitals that were forced to close.

Founded by philanthropists in 1884 for patients with chronic illness, Montefiore Medical Center is now a teaching hospital with nearly 1,500 patient beds. Montefiore has been recognized for its nationally ranked medical programs and its commitment to strategic investments in technology. Its CHP system enables Montefiore to provide efficient and reliable energy to approximately 90 percent of its patient areas.

Employing a network of five internal combustion engines and one combustion turbine, Montefiore's CHP system generates up to 11 MW of electricity and produces up to 27,000 pounds of steam per hour utilizing otherwise wasted heat. The steam is used to meet over 95 percent of the Medical Center's thermal energy demands, which include hot water, space heating, and space cooling.

With an operating efficiency of 69 percent, the CHP system requires approximately 26 percent less fuel than supplying electricity from the grid and producing steam with a boiler. The system also prevents emissions of air pollutants, including an estimated 17,900 tons per year of CO2 emissions, equal to that from the generation of electricity used by more than 2,000 homes. Moreover, by generating electricity on site, the system displaces grid-supplied electricity and reduces demands on New York City's electric power transmission and distribution system.

EPA's CHP Partnership also recognizes its Partner Solar Turbines for its contributions to the success of this project.

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NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center This award recognizes NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center for the superior efficiency of its CHP system, which produces both electricity and steam for the hospital's operations.

Motivated by its interest in enhancing the reliability of its electricity supply, reducing its environmental footprint, and lowering operating costs, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital installed a CHP system at its Weill Cornell Medical Center campus. The system is designed to operate and remain fully functioning during a power outage, ensuring that critical patient care operations at the hospital can continue without interruption. According to the hospital, it was the first in New York City capable of operating independently from the grid.

Founded in 1771 and located on Manhattan's Upper East Side, NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center is an 850-bed teaching hospital.

Using a natural gas-fired combustion turbine and heat recovery steam generator, the CHP system generates up to 7.5 MW of electricity and produces up to 70,000 pounds of steam per hour. The steam is used to provide space heating and hot water for the hospital staff and its patients. The system can supply 100 percent of the electricity needed by the hospital's inpatient areas, mitigating the risk to inpatients from a power outage.

With an operating efficiency of 72 percent, the CHP system requires approximately 27 percent less fuel than supplying electricity from the grid and producing steam with a boiler. The system also prevents emissions of air pollutants, including an estimated 21,500 per year of CO2, equal to that from the generation of electricity used by more than 2,400 homes. Moreover, by generating electricity on site, the system displaces grid-supplied electricity and reduces demands on existing transmission and distribution infrastructure—while saving the hospital approximately $5 million per year.

EPA's CHP Partnership also recognizes its Partners Dylan Associates, Gotham 360, Luthin Associates, NYSERDA, and Solar Turbines for their contributions to the success of this system.

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New York University

New York University This award recognizes New York University (NYU) for the superior efficiency of its CHP system that produces steam and electricity for its Greenwich Village campus in lower Manhattan.

Like a growing number of institutions of higher learning, NYU, a research university with 38,000 students and 12,000 faculty members, developed a Climate Action Plan to reduce the University's GHG emissions and enhance its overall sustainability. In 2010, NYU began operating a CHP system as a cornerstone of that plan.

NYU's CHP system is designed to operate and remain fully functioning during a power outage. The system was tested in 2012 when Hurricane Sandy knocked out power in lower Manhattan for several days. The system not only provided uninterrupted electricity, heating, and cooling to the campus as it was designed to do, but also enabled NYU and New York City officials to set up a command post on the campus as well as serve area residents forced to evacuate their homes in the wake of the storm.

The CHP system includes two combustion turbines, two heat recovery steam generators, and a steam turbine. Together this equipment generates up to 90,000 pounds of steam per hour and 12.8 MW of electricity. The electricity supplies 22 campus buildings. The steam is used to produce hot water distributed to 37 campus buildings to meet 100 percent of their space heating, space cooling, and hot water needs. When campus electrical demand is low, the excess electricity is sold to Con Edison. The system reduces the University's energy costs by over $5 million annually.

With an operating efficiency of nearly 75 percent, the CHP system requires approximately 27 percent less fuel than supplying electricity from the grid and producing steam with a boiler. The system also prevents emissions of air pollutants, including an estimated 43,400 tons per year of CO2 emissions, equal to that from the electricity used by more than 4,900 homes. Moreover, by generating electricity on site, the system displaces grid-supplied power and reduces demands on existing transmission and distribution infrastructure.

EPA's CHP Partnership also recognizes its Partners Solar Turbines, SourceOne, and Vanderweil Engineers for their contributions to the success of this project.

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Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University This award recognizes Texas A&M University for the superior energy efficiency of the CHP system serving its campus in College Station, Texas.

Texas A&M's CHP system is designed to operate and remain fully functioning during a power outage, ensuring that critical operations can continue without interruption. The system's ability to operate independently from the grid ensures power reliability for university facilities, including numerous research facilities, dormitories, and a veterinary hospital. Texas A&M's facilities have provided emergency housing for people endangered or displaced by storms, including Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

In 2011, the university—which serves over 50,000 students while also supporting faculty, staff, research, and statewide agricultural and engineering extension services—replaced its existing CHP system with a new and more efficient system. In addition to generating up to 45 MW of electricity, the new system produces steam and chilled water that provide the 5,000-acre campus with space cooling, space heating, and hot water. CHP has played a key role in reducing the University's energy consumption by more than 40 percent per square foot over the last 10 years, resulting in nearly $150 million in savings.

With an operating efficiency of 70 percent, the CHP system requires approximately 33 percent less fuel than supplying electricity from the grid and producing steam with a boiler. The system also prevents emissions of air pollutants, including an estimated 99,600 tons per year of CO2 emissions, equal to that from the generation of electricity used by more than 11,000 homes.

EPA's CHP Partnership also recognizes its Partners GE Energy, Jacobs Engineering, and the U.S. Department of Energy for their contributions to the success of this project.

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