Jump to main content or area navigation.

Contact Us

Combined Heat and Power Partnership

2014 AwardsWinners of the 2014 ENERGY STAR® CHP Award


Announced September 30, 2014

  • Eastman Chemical Company, Tennessee Operations for its 200 MW CHP system, which includes 17 GE steam turbine generators, at its Kingsport industrial campus—one of the largest chemical manufacturing sites in North America. This facility employs nearly 7,000 people and manufactures chemicals, fibers, and plastics used to produce hundreds of products from wall paint to credit cards.
  • Janssen Research & Development, LLC for its 3.8 MW CHP system, powered by a Caterpillar lean-burn low-emissions reciprocating natural gas generator set, which is helping the company meet goals to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 20 percent from 2011 levels and install 50 MW of clean energy generation by 2020.
  • Merck West Point CoGen3 Facility for its 38 MW CHP system, powered by a GE 6B Heavy-Duty gas turbine, which produces steam to heat, cool, and dehumidify approximately 7 million square feet of manufacturing, laboratory, and office space, and is helping Merck to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 15 percent from 2012 levels by 2020.

Eastman Chemical Company, Tennessee Operations

Eastman Chemical Company ("Eastman") is meeting the energy demands of its Kingsport, Tennessee facility by using CHP. At the Kingsport industrial campus—one of the largest chemical manufacturing sites in North America—Eastman manufactures chemicals, fibers, and plastics used to produce hundreds of products, from wall paint to credit cards. Nearly 7,000 people are employed at the site.

Seventeen boilers produce steam to support manufacturing processes, help meet the space heating/cooling needs of 550 buildings, and drive 17 GE and two ABB steam turbine generators with a combined design output of 200 MW.

Industrial facilities typically use boilers to produce high-pressure steam, and then reduce the steam pressure with a series of valves. Instead of valves, Eastman captures the excess pressure with turbine-generators to produce low-cost electricity.

With an operating efficiency of more than 78 percent, the predominantly coal-fired system requires approximately 14 percent less fuel than grid-supplied electricity and conventional steam production. The system also avoids emissions of air pollutants, including an estimated 358,000 tons of carbon dioxide annually, equal to the emissions from the generation of electricity used by more than 44,000 homes. Moreover, by generating electricity on site, the system reduces demands on existing transmission and distribution infrastructure.

The extent of Eastman's CHP use is evidence of the company's commitment to corporate sustainability and its understanding of the environmental, economic, and reliability benefits of CHP. Eastman's Kingsport facility is a noteworthy example of how manufacturers can use CHP to improve industrial energy efficiency, enhance U.S. manufacturing competitiveness, and reduce carbon pollution—while saving Eastman Chemical approximately $45 million per year.

Top of page

Janssen Research & Development, LLC

Janssen Research & Development, LLC, one of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, operates a global research facility located in Spring House, Pennsylvania. The company is focused on citizenship and sustainability priorities, which include goals to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 20 percent from 2011 levels and install 50 MW of clean energy generation by 2020. The CHP system at the Janssen R&D facility is helping to meet these goals.

At the heart of the system is a Caterpillar 3.8 MW lean-burn low-emissions reciprocating natural gas generator set, which can supply 60 percent of the annual power needs for the site. Heat from the engine exhaust and engine block that would otherwise be wasted is used to produce steam and hot water to supply approximately 40 percent of the thermal energy used to support R&D operations and heat, cool, and dehumidify the facility's buildings.

With an operating efficiency of more than 62 percent, the system requires approximately 29 percent less fuel than grid-supplied electricity and conventional steam production. The system also avoids emissions of air pollutants, including an estimated 8,700 tons of carbon dioxide annually, equal to the emissions from the generation of electricity used by more than 1,000 homes. Moreover, by generating electricity on site, the system reduces demands on existing transmission and distribution infrastructure.

Janssen Research and Development's CHP system saves approximately $1.1 million per year and is a noteworthy example of how research companies can use CHP to improve energy efficiency, enhance U.S. manufacturing competitiveness, and reduce carbon pollution.

Top of page

Merck West Point CoGen3 Facility

Recognizing that climate change could significantly impact global health, Merck & Co.—one of the world's leading research driven healthcare product manufacturers—has committed to reducing its greenhouse gas emissions by 15 percent from 2012 levels by 2020.

In 2001, Merck installed and began operating the CoGen3 CHP system at its West Point facility, a pharmaceutical and vaccine manufacturing, R&D, and warehouse and distribution center that employs more than 8,500 people. The system, designed by Burns & Roe, is powered by a 38 MW GE 6B Heavy-Duty gas turbine and recovers otherwise-wasted heat to produce steam to heat, cool, and dehumidify approximately 7 million square feet of manufacturing, laboratory, and office space. The CoGen3 CHP system is the third CHP system that Merck has installed at the 400-acre West Point, Pennsylvania campus.

With an operating efficiency of more than 75 percent, the natural gas-fired system requires approximately 30 percent less fuel than grid-supplied electricity and conventional steam production. The system also avoids emissions of air pollutants, including an estimated 138,000 tons of carbon dioxide annually, equal to the emissions from the generation of electricity used by more than 17,000 homes. Moreover, by generating electricity on site and with the capability of supplying excess electricity to the grid, the system reduces demands on existing transmission and distribution infrastructure.

The system increases energy reliability, and significantly reduces operating costs and the facility's environmental footprint. It also provided uninterrupted power and heat when hurricane Sandy threatened the facility's grid-supplied electricity. In addition, the system received the Pennsylvania Governor's Award for Excellence in 2001 for doubling the facility's onsite electric generation capacity without increasing nitrogen oxide emissions.

The CHP system is a noteworthy example of how manufacturers can use CHP to improve industrial energy efficiency, enhance U.S. manufacturing competitiveness and reduce carbon pollution.

Top of page

Jump to main content.