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2005 National Award for Smart Growth Achievement

This publication is also available as a PDF (20 pp, 847 K, about PDF). Hard copies available by emailing nscep@bps-lmit.com or calling (800) 490-9198 and requesting EPA 231-K-05-001.

People sitting outside a cafe

A MESSAGE FROM THE ADMINISTRATOR
Stephen L. Johnson, EPA Administrator National Award for Smart Growth Achievement logo

Congratulations to the winners of the Environmental Protection Agency's 2005 National Awards for Smart Growth Achievement!

At EPA we are proud of the gains in environmental protection that have been made over the past 35 years, but also recognize that 21st century environmental challenges require new approaches beyond the old model of mandates, rules, and regulations. EPA is developing new collaborative partnerships that will accelerate the pace of protecting and conserving our nation's environment. Together, through these partnerships, we are developing policies and programs that promote environmentally sound growth. Protecting our shared environment is everybody's responsibility. EPA is pleased to recognize these partner communities who join in our commitment to smart growth. Through the use of innovative tools and technology they are improving their environmental quality, creating transportation choices, and growing their local economies.

Thank you to all of those who took part in the competition. We continue to be impressed by the excitement about our National Awards for Smart Growth Achievement and in the quality of the applications year after year. Effective, collaborative, and innovative-the winners demonstrate the very best of smart growth implementation. Like previous years, the 2005 award recipients will serve as examples for communities around the country as we work towards a safer, healthier future for our children and grandchildren.

Stephen L. Johnson
EPA Administrator

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HOW SMART GROWTH PROTECTS THE ENVIRONMENT

Boy playing with his dog
Communities with daily destinations within an easy walk allow people the choice of walking or driving. Driving less can reduce asthma-triggering pollutants from vehicles.

How our communities choose to grow affects our environment. Development that integrates smart growth principles can reduce air pollution and help protect rivers, streams, and drinking water.

Communities with homes, workplaces, stores, and other amenities nearby make it easy for residents to walk, bike, take transit, or drive to their destinations. Research shows that people who live in this kind of neighborhood drive as much as 30 percent less than those who live in spread-out developments.1 As a result, they generate fewer hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides, the chemicals that mix with sunlight to form ground-level ozone. Lower ozone levels may reduce the incidence of asthma attacks. Studies suggest that efforts to reduce driving in Atlanta during the 1996 Olympic Games not only reduced traffic, but may also have reduced the number of acute care asthma cases by 11 to 44 percent.2

Efficient, less spread-out growth can also reduce the demand for and cost of clean drinking water. Households in compact communities that are near water treatment facilities tend to use and lose less water, and require less infrastructure investment than more distant, dispersed developments.3 Research from Utah suggests that the cost of supplying water to households in close-in communities could be as much as 20 percent less than the cost for communities on the edge of developed areas.4 Using existing infrastructure wisely and encouraging growth in already-developed areas can help communities continue to grow within their water supplies and their budgets.



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NATIONAL AWARD FOR SMART GROWTH ACHIEVEMENT WINNERS

OVERALL EXCELLENCE IN SMART GROWTH
Highlands' Garden Village
Denver Urban Renewal Authority
Denver, Colorado

BUILT PROJECTS
Belmar
City of Lakewood and Lakewood Reinvestment Authority
Lakewood, Colorado

POLICIES AND REGULATIONS
Central District Specific Plan
City of Pasadena Planning and Development Department
Pasadena, California

SMALL COMMUNITIES
Gilbert & Bennett Wire Mill Redevelopment
Town of Redding
Redding, Connecticut

MILITARY BASE REDEVELOPMENT
Baldwin Park
City of Orlando
Orlando, Florida

Girl riding bike in front of new homes.

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ABOUT THE AWARD

About the Award: Rosslyn-Ballston Corridor, Arlington, VA. Photo courtesy of Arlington County.EPA created the National Award for Smart Growth Achievement in 2002 to recognize outstanding approaches to development that benefit the economy, the community, public health, and the environment. Over the past four years, EPA has received 375 applications from 43 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.

Each award winner has successfully used the principles of smart growth to improve existing communities or to build new communities that foster economic development, protect the environment, and enhance quality of life. Using innovative ideas and public involvement, the winners crafted policies and projects that significantly improved their communities and the environment.

This year's rotating category highlights the redevelopment of former military base properties. The 2005 Base Realignment and Closure process will close bases in many communities, presenting economic, environmental, and social challenges. The winner in this award category provides a model for how communities near closed bases can turn the loss into an opportunity. They can strengthen their economy, while restoring and protecting the environment, by redeveloping the base to provide jobs, homes, recreation, and civic services.

The award winners were chosen through a multi-step process. A panel of external experts representing a broad range of constituencies assessed the entries. An internal EPA review panel provided additional comments. EPA's Associate Administrator of Policy, Economics, and Innovation made the final award determinations.

Smart Growth Principles

  1. Mix land uses.
  2. Take advantage of compact building design.
  3. Create housing opportunities and choices for a range of household types, family sizes, and incomes.
  4. Create walkable neighborhoods.
  5. Foster distinctive, attractive communities with a strong sense of place.
  6. Preserve open space, farmland, natural beauty, and critical environmental areas.
  7. Reinvest in and strengthen existing communities, and achieve more balanced regional development.
  8. Provide a variety of transportation choices.
  9. Make development decisions predictable, fair, and cost effective.
  10. Encourage citizen and stakeholder participation in development decisions.

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OVERALL EXCELLENCE IN SMART GROWTH

Highlands' Garden Village
Denver Urban Renewal Authority
Denver, Colorado

"A neighborhood isn't only the 'sticks and bricks;' the life of a community happens in the spaces between the buildings. The commitments to responsible density, age and economic diversity, green building, and involving the community in the planning process have all made HGV an asset to Northwest Denver."
- Mary Anderies
Chair of the West Highlands, Neighborhood Association, Elitch Redevelopment Committee

For More Information:
Tracy Huggins
Executive Director
Denver Urban Renewal Authority
Tel: 303-534-3872
Tracy.Huggins@ci.denver.co.us

Mother playing with her children on sidewalk
Residents share landscaped common areas and playgrounds rather than having large individual yards.

The Denver Urban Renewal Authority facilitated redevelopment of a former amusement park into a distinctive, compact neighborhood only 10 minutes from downtown. The project not only brought new homes, shops, and parks to the city, it also helped create a model for convenient, walkable communities throughout the region.

Car parked on street
Smaller lot sizes and native, drought tolerant landscaping in tree wells and gardens reduce demand for water.

When Denver's Elitch Gardens amusement park relocated in 1994, it left behind a 27-acre site just five miles from downtown. On this site, the Denver Urban Renewal Authority (DURA) helped facilitate the vision, design, financing, and economic development of Highlands' Garden Village, an innovative, compact, mixed-use community that has become a model for developments throughout the Denver area.

Early in the process, design workshops engaged citizens and community leaders in the redevelopment. The resulting neighborhood reconnects the street grid with innovative "skinny streets," creating a great place to walk around. To blend in well with existing neighbors, commercial buildings and apartments are sited across from existing commercial blocks, and single-family homes front their counterparts in adjacent neighborhoods. The buildings reflect traditional Denver architectural styles, further integrating them into the historic neighborhoods around them.

Despite its small size, Highlands' Garden Village offers a wide variety of home choices-single-family houses, mixed-income and senior apartments, town homes, live-work lofts, carriage houses, and co-housing condominiums-all built with recycled or recyclable materials. The neighborhood also includes shops, a school, and community gathering places, as well as gardens, a carousel pavilion, and a restored, historic theater preserved from the original park.

The project's innovative design required nontraditional approaches to financing. DURA created an Urban Renewal District and provided tax increment financing and direct equity investment in the project. The public investment has paid off. Both residential and commercial property values have increased at faster rates in the project area than in the region as a whole. The project has also spurred development on adjacent streets, raising the area's sales tax revenue by 20 percent during a period of regional sales tax decline.

By taking advantage of its distinctive character and convenient location, Highlands' Garden Village has turned a once-vacant site into a thriving, attractive neighborhood and shown that a small site can give a community a big boost.

Highlands' Garden Village's narrow streets, higher densities, variety of homes, and mix of uses required new zoning allowances, which the city has since modified and adopted to create its first mixed-use overlay zone.

mixed housing in a neighborhood
The wide variety of housing types and prices allows single people, seniors, and families to live in the same community.

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BUILT PROJECTS

Belmar
City of Lakewood and Lakewood Reinvestment Authority
Lakewood, Colorado

The City of Lakewood teamed up with a local developer to turn a declining shopping mall into Belmar, a new downtown with a distinct identity. Backed by strong public involvement, Lakewood created a vibrant destination that, in addition to new stores, provides places for people to meet, new premium office space, and home and apartment options that had not been available in the area.

"Everything about it is just fabulous. The whole design, the concept, the whole look of the area. It's the new downtown Lakewood."
- Samantha Bales
Belmar homebuyer

For More Information
Rebecca P. Clark (rebcla@lakewood.org)
Director
City of Lakewood, Community
Planning & Development Department
Tel: 303-987-7530

People walking on wide sidewalks
Stores open to wide sidewalks and have parking located in back of stores or in nearby lots. This design encourages people to walk around Belmar when they shop.

abandoned shopping mall
The economic decline of a mall created an opportunity for renewal in Lakewood.

In communities across the country, aging shopping centers are losing business to larger and newer competitors. The decline of these retail centers may leave holes in the community fabric, but it can also provide opportunities to reuse these sites to meet other community needs. Facing the decline of its Villa Italia shopping mall, the City of Lakewood worked with citizens, civic groups, and a local developer to transform the property into Belmar-the real, walkable downtown that this Denver suburb had lacked.

Belmar is located across the street from the city's government center. A traditional grid of narrow streets and small blocks replaces the footprint of the old mall. When complete in 2007, these new, pedestrian-friendly blocks will have one million square feet of shops, restaurants, and other services. The development will also include 1,300 new homes, including town homes, loft apartments, and live-work units. Belmar will have 700,000 square feet of the first new Class-A office space built in the area in over a decade. Nine acres of parks and plazas will give people a place to get together, relax, and enjoy festivals and other entertainment.

Putting time and effort into a high quality redevelopment of this site has been a great investment for Lakewood. Belmar brings a new sense of vibrancy and prosperity to the area. The redevelopment would not have been possible without a strong partnership between the city and the developer. The inclusive process transformed citizens' concerns about losing the mall into civic pride for their new downtown.

Belmar's first phase has been a success. Its retail income is comparable to higher-end malls. Belmar's office space is fully leased and rental and for-sale housing are outperforming the local market. Upon its completion, the city estimates it will add $952 million to the local economy and will directly create over 7,000 permanent jobs.

People walking in street fair
Belmar's role as a gathering place for Lakewood's citizens is enhanced by many festivals and events.

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POLICIES AND REGULATIONS

Central District Specific Plan
City of Pasadena Planning and Development Department
Pasadena, California

Created with extensive citizen participation, the City of Pasadena's Central District Specific Plan is encouraging downtown investment, making walking safe and inviting, and preserving its historic character. With this plan, Pasadena can grow while relieving pressure to build on steep, rural hillsides.

"These rules have been embraced by the development community; some voluntarily requested to use the new rules before they became effective."
- Bill Bogaard
Mayor of Pasadena

For More Information
Laura F. Dahl (ldahl@cityofpasadena.net)
Senior Planner
City of Pasadena, Planning and Development Department
Tel: 626-744-6767

Construction of new buildings
Under the plan, more than 2,500 new homes are being built near transit stations, like this development under construction at the Del Mar station. The convenient location lets residents choose whether to walk, bike, take the train or bus, or drive.

A popular town in the Los Angeles region, the City of Pasadena wanted to maintain its unique sense of place and give its residents choices about where they live and how they get around. Through its Central District Specific Plan, the city is encouraging housing in the downtown, near transit, and above stores. Design guidelines ensure new development fits in with community character.

The Planning Department engaged residents with a variety of tools to visualize changes in the city plan. On the low-tech end, planning staff used Play-Doh and cardboard boxes to show how development might look in a neighborhood. Taking advantage of more modern technology, the planning department made its Geographic Information System data available to the public; people printed maps of where they lived or worked with notes illustrating planned or existing projects. Planners used the maps to talk with citizens about what they valued and what changes they liked and disliked.

The plan has already shown success. Over 85 percent of all building permits new housing in Pasadena are in the Central District, and most are within one-half mile of a light rail station. Although it allows up to 5,095 units of housing, the plan is expected to reduce the projected traffic growth in the Central District. The growing downtown population means more customers for stores and businesses. As people stroll Pasadena's streets, stopping at its shops and restaurants, they are seeing the fruits of a plan for growth that respects historic buildings, capitalizes on its convenient transit stations, and encourages development in places where it makes environmental and economic sense.

When built out as planned, the Central District will occupy 10 percent of the land in Pasadena while generating an estimated 25 percent of the property taxes.

People signing papers in front of a bus
The city used this modified story bus to bring the planning process to community meetings, picnics, and other gatherings. Active outreach like this ensures that all members of the community have the opportunity to shape their city's future.

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SMALL COMMUNITIES

Gilbert & Bennett Wire Mill Redevelopment
Town of Redding
Redding, Connecticut

Cleaning up and redeveloping a brownfield site can be daunting for small communities. The Town of Redding overcame this challenge by working with a developer with brownfield experience to manage the cleanup and redevelopment of a closed industrial site into a healthy, convenient, attractive neighborhood.

"The Theater will be sort of the heartbeat of this development, and the whole complex will function as a center for Redding."
- Kate Ebbott
Board Member, Wire Mill Arts Foundation

For More Information
The Honorable Natalie Ketcham (FirstSelectman@TownofReddingCt.org)
First Selectman
Town of Redding
Tel: 203-938-2002

Classroom
Over 1,000 people, including citizens of Redding as well as local, regional, state, and federal stakeholders participated in workshops that helped define the cleanup plan, historic preservation guidelines, and master plan for the redevelopment.

Closure of the Gilbert & Bennett wire mill in 1989 left a 55-acre, contaminated, industrial site in Redding's Georgetown section, the primary commercial zone for this town of 8,400 residents. By 2002, the facility that was once a major source of tax revenue had accrued unpaid taxes of over $1 million. To revitalize the area and protect public health, the town partnered with a developer who not only paid the tax lien in full, but also cleaned up the contamination and is redeveloping the site into a mixed-use neighborhood. This partnership has been good for the town and the developer-each benefits from the new homes, businesses, services, and revenue.

In a week-long public workshop, over 1,000 stakeholders from the town and from regional, state, and federal governments developed the design for the new neighborhood. A key component of the plan is a lively diversity of uses, including 416 homes in a wide variety of styles, 109,000 square feet of shops and restaurants, 113,000 square feet of office space, a performing arts center with a black box theater, and a health facility with a public pool. To honor the mill's heritage, 15 of the site's historic buildings will be rehabilitated, and 21 new buildings will be designed in a historically sensitive manner.

Pedestrian-friendly design features such as trails, wide sidewalks, short blocks, and narrow streets encourage people to walk around the neighborhood. To give residents more transportation choices, the developer is building a commuter train station that will provide easy access to Manhattan.

The Gilbert & Bennett wire mill redevelopment is a model for complex reuse projects. The strong public-private partnership invited community input in the design process, facilitated the remediation plan, and expedited adoption of the master plan.

When the neighborhood is complete, the Town of Redding expects that it will create over 1,700 permanent jobs and provide the town with $4.7 million in new, annual property tax revenues.

Gilbert & Bennett Wire Mill
The brownfield cleanup at the Gilbert & Bennett wire mill and the preservation of its historic buildings protects public health and community character while offering new choices in homes, shopping, restaurants, and entertainment.

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MILITARY BASE REDEVELOPMENT

Baldwin Park
City of Orlando
Orlando, Florida

When an 1,100-acre naval training facility in Orlando was closed, the city and its partners used the opportunity to create an exciting new community that reconnects with surrounding neighborhoods and provides new homes, jobs, stores, and parks, all just a few miles from downtown Orlando.

"The planning and partnerships that brought Baldwin Park to fruition had one clear vision: Of the day youngsters rode their bicycles on community sidewalks, families picnicked in one of the community's parks, and grandparents watched their grandchildren thrive in a true neighborhood."
Glenda Hood
Florida Secretary of State and former Mayor of Orlando

For More Information
Dean Grandin, Jr. (Dean.Grandin@cityoforlando.net)
Director, City Planning Division
City of Orlando, Department of Economic Development
Tel: 407-246-2120

People on sidewalk outside of townhouses
Living in convenient, walkable neighborhoods, residents have more choices in how they get around.

House near the water
Audubon of Florida helped plan parks and water edges, recreating ecosystems that were lost years ago.

When the U.S. Navy announced in 1993 that it would close the Orlando Naval Training Center, the City of Orlando saw an opportunity to build a vibrant, mixed-use neighborhood that would make the base property once again part of the community. The city formed a Base Reuse Commission of 150 community leaders and organized meetings to plan the property's future. In 174 meetings, citizens helped devise and refine a plan to redevelop the base. At a visioning workshop, citizens described what they wanted: a variety of housing types, a vibrant main street, public access to lakes, and linkages with existing neighborhoods.

Before rebuilding could begin, 256 buildings, 200 miles of underground utilities, and 25 miles of road had to be dismantled and recycled. Asbestos and lead paint in the buildings and arsenic and petroleum in the soil needed to be cleaned up. Four hundred and forty days after demolition began, one of the largest recycling projects in the nation's history was complete, and the work of building a new community began. Since the first model opened in 2003, Baldwin Park has sold lots and houses faster than any comparable project in the area. When construction ends in 2008, Baldwin Park will be home to 10,000 residents living in 4,100 homes, ranging from rental apartments to custom homes, all built in architectural styles traditional to the area. In addition, 6,000 people will work in offices throughout the neighborhood and in shops in the Village Center. Everyone will be able to enjoy over 450 acres of lakes and parks, including over two miles of lakefront property reserved for public use.

Baldwin Park's residents, workers, visitors, and neighbors will also have many choices in how they get around. There are 50 miles of trails and sidewalks on an interconnected street grid for walking and biking. Traffic, once blocked by the former base's security fence, can now flow through 32 new intersections that connect Baldwin Park streets to surrounding neighborhoods, reducing congestion. The redevelopment of this former naval base gave the citizens of Orlando what they wanted and planned for: a thriving new community and a legacy for future generations to enjoy.

Since it's an infill redevelopment project, Baldwin Park can take advantage of existing power plants and water and wastewater treatment facilities. At the same time, the city will gain an additional $30 million in annual property tax revenues.

Children in playground
The community created 16 extra acres of parkland by using innovative, underground, stormwater management systems.

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CONTINUING ACHIEVEMENTS OF PAST AWARD WINNERS

 

2004 Award Winners

Town of Davidson, North Carolina
Overall Excellence in Smart Growth

City of Greensboro, North Carolina
Built Projects

City of Santa Cruz, California
Policies and Regulations

Sacramento Area, California, Council of Governments
Community Outreach and Education

San Juan Pueblo, New Mexico
Small Communities

Select Achievements of 2004 Award Winners

Man standing outside house
New accessory units are increasing housing opportunities in Santa Cruz.

City of Santa Cruz, California
Policies and Regulations
Thanks to the city's Accessory Dwelling Unit program, forty permits for accessory units were issued in 2004, at least five times more than the average issued per year before the program was adopted. These homes will offer citizens new and affordable housing options. The program continues to receive national recognition, including a 2005 American Planning Association Award and a 2005 Honor Award from the American Institute of Architects.

San Juan Pueblo, New Mexico
Small Communities
San Juan Pueblo's award-winning master plan includes plans for a two to three-block Main Street. The community is currently conducting infrastructure planning for streets and utilities in this area, with construction slated for 2006. In 2005, the Ohkay Owingeh Housing Authority built five homes as part of a home ownership project.

 

2003 Award Winners

Metropolitan Council, Minnesota
Overall Excellence in Smart Growth

Department of the Navy
Built Projects

Georgia Office of Quality Growth
Community Outreach and Education

Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Treasurer's Office
Policies and Regulations

City of Raleigh and Wake County, North Carolina, Public School System
Public Schools

Select Achievements of 2003 Award Winners

Navy Housing
The Navy provides a variety of types and sizes of homes to meet the different needs of military families.

Metropolitan Council, Minnesota
Overall Excellence in Smart Growth
In 2004 the Metropolitan Council awarded 46 Livable Communities Grants worth over $15 million to communities in the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area. These efforts will result in over 400 new affordable homes, 4,400 new or retained jobs, and 140 acres of reclaimed land. The grants will leverage an anticipated $1.88 billion in additional private and other public investments.

Department of the Navy
Built Projects
Through its partnership with Clark Realty Capital and Lincoln Property Company, the Department of the Navy continues to redevelop its family housing using smart growth principles. The redevelopment of Gateway Village in San Diego follows traditional neighborhood design and includes smaller blocks, narrower and interconnected streets, sidewalks, and garages that are either set back or alley loaded. When finished, the new neighborhood for Navy and Marine families will feature 460 three- to four-bedroom homes and a variety of community amenities. Over 100,000 tons of demolished material from the redevelopment were recycled.

 

2002 Award Winners

Arlington County, Virginia
Overall Excellence in Smart Growth

Town of Breckenridge, Colorado, Planning Department
Built Projects

City/County Association of Governments of San Mateo County, California
Policies and Regulations

Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs
Community Outreach and Education

Select Achievements of 2002 Award Winners

Contruction crane
A construction crane rises above the Central Post Office redevelopment project in Arlington, Virginia.

Arlington County, Virginia
Overall Excellence in Smart Growth
Arlington County continues to bring smart, efficient development to the Rosslyn-Ballston corridor, focusing on creating affordable housing and preserving a distinct sense of place. In 2004 construction began on 1,270 housing units, 8,900 sq. ft. of retail space, and 911,000 sq. ft. of office space. A former church next to a Metro station is being redeveloped into 116 apartments, 70 of which will be reserved for lower-income residents. The historic central post office is being preserved as part of a new mixed-use development, which will include about 85,000 sq. ft. of office and retail space and 194 condominiums.

Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs
Community Outreach and Education
The EOEA continues to fund community preservation grants. In 2003-2004, it gave $1.5 million to help communities revise their regulations to allow smart growth. In addition, it provided $1.2 million to implement riverfront development plans in seven communities. The agency has also implemented a Commonwealth Capital Policy, which uses $500 million in state grants and loans to encourage communities to adopt policies and codes that create safe and convenient neighborhoods with homes that people can afford.

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Couple sitting outside a soda shop

Review Panel
Laurence Aurbach, The Town Paper
Tara Butler, National Governors Association
Dan Emerine, International City/County Management Association
Steve Gallagher, National Association of Industrial and Office Properties
Kris Krider, City of Davidson
John Kuriawa, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Bob McNamara, National Association of REALTORS®
Robin Murray, American Institute of Architects
Arthur C. Nelson, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Michael Pawlukiewicz, Urban Land Institute
Robert Ritter, Federal Highway Administration
Scot Spencer, The Annie E. Casey Foundation
Ed Tombari, National Association of Home Builders

Photo Credits
Front cover: Lowry, CO. Photos courtesy of Lowry Redevelopment Authority. How Smart Growth Protects the Environment: King Farm, Rockville, MD. U.S. EPA, Development, Community and Environment Division.
About the Award: Market Common, Arlington, VA. U.S. EPA, Development, Community and Environment Division.
Winners page: The Village at NTC, San Diego, CA. Photo courtesy of the Department of the Navy.
Case study photos courtesy of award winners, except Pasadena Del Mar station photo, courtesy of Art Cueto.
Continuing Achievements, 2004: Santa Cruz, CA. Photo courtesy of City of Santa Cruz. Continuing Achievements, 2003: Gateway Village, San Diego, CA. Photo courtesy of the Department of the Navy.
Continuing Achievements, 2002: Arlington, VA. U.S. EPA, Development, Community and Environment Division.
Acknowledgements: Davidson, NC. Photo courtesy of Town of Davidson.
Back cover: San Juan Pueblo, New Mexico. Photo courtesy of Jamie Blosser.

National Building Museum
The 2005 National Award for Smart Growth Achievement ceremony was held at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC, on November 15. The National Building Museum, created by an act of Congress in 1980, is America's premier cultural institution dedicated to exploring and celebrating architecture, design, engineering, construction, and urban planning. Since opening its doors in 1985, the museum has become a vital forum for exchanging ideas and information about such topical issues as managing suburban growth, preserving landmarks and communities, and revitalizing urban centers. Its engaging exhibitions and education programs, including innovative curricula for school children and stimulating programs for adults, annually attract nearly 400,000 people, making the museum the most-visited institution of its kind in the world.

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San Juan Pueblo, New Mexico

For more information about the National Award for Smart Growth Achievement and EPA's other smart growth activities, visit the Smart Growth home page.

 

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