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Food Recovery Resources for Service Providers

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This page provides resources for service providers like Universities and Colleges, Sporting and Entertainment Venues, and Grocers and Supermarkets. These service providers can reduce the amount of food sent to landfills by following the Food Recovery Hierarchy. Putting Surplus Food to Good Use: A How-to Guide for Food Service Providers (PDF) (2 pp, 214K) provides resources and examples of how to divert wasted food to a more productive use through these activities (from most preferable to least preferable):

The Food Recovery Challenge can assist service providers in reducing food waste through these activities.

Want to know how much money implementing a food recovery program could save you? Use the Food Waste Management Cost Calculator to determine the cost competitiveness of recovering food rather than just throwing it in the landfill.

Universities and Colleges Success Stories

More Resources for
Universities and Colleges

Universities and colleges generate wasted food from many sources: dining commons, on-campus restaurants, residence halls, sporting venues, and university events. By reducing food sent to landfills or incinerators, schools can save money, reduce their environmental impact, and inform students about the importance of not wasting food.

Source Reduction/Prevention

Feeding People

Feeding Animals

Composting

Anaerobic Digestion

Sporting and Entertainment Venues Success Stories

More Resources for Sporting and Entertainment Venues

Sporting and entertainment venues attract millions of people each year for sports games, concerts, and other events. Concessions at these events generate a lot of food waste, more than one pound per person estimates Northeast Recycling Council. This food waste includes preparation-waste or leftover/unsold food from vendors, as well as plate scraps from attendees. By reducing food sent to landfills or incinerators at these events, venues can save money, reduce their environmental impact, help those in need. They can also teach patrons about the importance of reducing their food waste.

Source Reduction

Feeding People

Composting

Grocery Store and Supermarket Success Stories

More Resources for Grocers and Supermarkets
Food is the business of grocery stores and supermarkets. Some food does not meet the grocer's quality standards and some fresh food goes unsold, such as salad bar leftovers. By reducing food sent to landfills or incinerators, grocers can save money, reduce their environmental impact, and help those in need.

Source Reduction/Prevention

Feeding People

Composting

Supermarket Composting Handbook & Resources

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The Supermarket Composting Handbook (PDF) (78 pp, 1.4 MB) was created for the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection with funding from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In addition to the handbook, below are templates, sample language, and other resources that you can adapt to fit your needs.


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