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Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Sediments (ARCS) Program

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exit EPA [About PDF]


by
James P. Allen
October 1994

United States Department of the Interior
Bureau of Mines
Salt Lake City Research Center
729 Arapeen Drive
Salt Lake City, Utah 84108

 

Prepared for
The Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Sediments (ARCS) Program
Great Lakes National Program Office
U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, IL

 

Mineral Processing Pretreatment of Contaminated Sediment

Ashtabula River, Buffalo River,
Indiana Harbor/Grand Calumet River
  and Saginaw River and Bay
Areas of Concern

The information in this document has been funded in whole or in part by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under Interagency Agreements No. DW14934541-1 and DW14934541-2 with the U. S. Bureau of Mines. It has been subjected to the Agency's peer and administrative review and it has been approved for publication as an EPA document.

 

ABSTRACT

The U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM), Department of the Interior, was requested by the Great Lakes National Program Office, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, to evaluate various mineral processing techniques for their effectiveness in assisting with remediation of contaminated sediments in rivers and harbors around the Great Lakes. Samples from the Ashtabula River, Buffalo River, Indiana Harbor/Grand Calumet River, and Saginaw River and Bay Areas of Concern were received by USBM and evaluated in this study. USBM used grain size analysis, surface area, and electron microscopy techniques to characterize the sediments and their contaminants. Grain size separation, magnetic separation, gravity separation, attrition scrubbing, and froth flotation were evaluated for their effectiveness in concentrating contaminants from sediment samples representing each of the four sites.

The concept found to show promise in assisting remediation has been called pretreatment and involves using mineral processing technology such as size separation to separate a contaminant-laden portion from the bulk of the sediment. The result of this is that the size and cost of the final treatment or disposal effort can be reduced. Other potential benefits include improved effectiveness of any treatment process to follow and possible beneficial use of cleaner sediment fractions. This report shows that grain size separation applied to a coarse-grained sediment such as that from the Saginaw River has potential to concentrate metallic and organic contaminants in approximately 20 percent of the sediment mass. Potential applications of magnetic separation at Indiana Harbor, and froth flotation at Saginaw River, are also deemed to show limited application.


Table Of Content 

ABSTRACT
LIST OF FIGURES
LIST OF TABLES

INTRODUCTION
Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Sediments
Sample Description
Evaluating Results of Physical Separations
Special Procedures in Evaluating Organic Contaminants
Technical Approach
Data Quality
Froth Flotation Separations for Organic Contaminants LABORATORY PROCEDURES
Methods Selection
Deoiling
Working Size Fractions
Sample Preparation
Chemical Analysis
Grain Size Analysis
Gravity Separation
Magnetic Separations
Froth Flotation
Metallic Contaminants
Organic Contaminants
Attrition Scrubbing SAMPLE CHARACTERIZATION
Density Measurements
Specific Surface Area Determinations
Mineralogical Characterization

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
Ashtabula River
Grain Size Separation
Gravity Separation
Froth Flotation--Organic Contaminants
Amine ethoxylate surfactants
Ethoxylated alcohol surfactants
Buffalo River
Grain Size Separation
Gravity (Density) Separations
Magnetic Separation
Froth Flotation--Metallic Contaminants
Attrition Scrubbing
Froth Flotation--Organic Contaminants
Amine ethoxylate surfactants
Ethoxylated alcohol surfactants
Indiana Harbor Ship Canal and Grand Calumet River
Grain Size Separation
Gravity (Density) Separations
Magnetic Separations
Froth Flotation--Metailic Contaminants
Attrition Scrubbing
Froth Flotation--Organic Contaminants
Ethoxylated alcohol surfactants
Grand Calumet River--Amine ethoxylate surfactants
Size Classification--Organic Contaminants
Saginaw River
Grain Size Separation
Gravity (Density) Separations--Metallic Contaminants
Magnetic Separations
Froth Flotation--Metallic Contaminants
Attrition Scrubbing
Froth Flotation--Organic Contaminants
Anionic surfactants
Amine ethoxylate surfactants
Nonionic surfactants
Grain-size Separation--Organic Contaminants
Gravity Separation--Organic Contaminants

CONCLUSIONS
General Comments
Grain Size Separation
Potential for Recycling of Metallic Contaminants
Summaries
Ashtabula River
Buffalo River
Indiana Harbor
Saginaw River
Feasibility Matrix RECOMMENDATIONS
REFERENCES
GLOSSARY OF MINERAL PROCESSING TERMINOLOGY
APPENDIX

MINERALOGY OF CONTAMINATED GREAT LAKES SEDIMENTS
INTRODUCTION
RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
Ashtabula River Sediment
Buffalo River Sediment
Indiana Harbor Canal Sediment
Saginaw River Sediment

CONCLUSIONS

APPENDIX-QUALITY ASSURANCE PROJECT PLAN

 


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