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Recommended Management and Disposal Options for Mercury-Containing Products

Related Information

Mercury-Containing Products

Alternatives to Mercury-Containing Products Exit EPA

Mercury can be found in various consumer and commercial products. When a mercury-containing product breaks and the mercury is spilled, the exposed mercury can evaporate and become an invisible, odorless toxic vapor. Some of these products such as mercury-containing thermometers can break easily and spill mercury. To prevent mercury releases, these products should be used and stored safely, and managed properly at the end of their useful lives. Many other products, however, such as mercury switches in appliances, are unlikely to break until the products are disposed of, and therefore present little spillage hazard in people's homes. The lists below--

-- contain:

Please note:

  1. The product list is not complete and not all brands of the listed items contain mercury. Please check with individual manufacturers or view the resources listed in the Related Information box on the right for additional information about mercury-containing products and products that are alternatives to mercury-containing products.

  2. Labeling laws in some states may aid you in identifying which products contain mercury. Some states, such as Connecticut and Maryland, have passed laws requiring manufacturers selling products in those states to label those products containing mercury. In addition, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission has required that starting in 2012, all light bulbs must have new "lighting facts" labels, and all light bulbs that contain mercury must be labeled as such. Learn more about the new labels for light bulbs.

Consumer Products: Home Items

Product Type Source /Purpose of Mercury Spill Risk / Recommended Management

Airflow/fan limit controls

Source: Mercury tilt switches are inside the controls. The switches are small tubes with electrical contacts at one end of the tubes.

Purpose: When the tube is tilted, the mercury flows to either end, cutting off the circuit on one end, while opening it on the other side. They often function as on/off switches.

Spill Risk: None, if units are intact.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

Antiques*:

  • Barometers
  • Clock Pendulums
  • Mirrors
  • Organs

* View more information about mercury-containing antiques from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and from the State of Connecticut.

Antique Barometers

Source: See photos Exit EPA of stick barometers with closed mercury and open mercury systems and banjo/wheel/dial barometer with an open mercury system.

Purpose: A change in the level of the mercury indicates the passage of a high or low pressure front above your area, and a corresponding change in weather.

Antique Clock Pendulums

Source: Many of the early-to-mid 1800 French crystal regulator clocks were fitted with mercury compensated pendulums.

Purpose: The pendulums were designed to compensate for temperature variations and to keep the center of oscillation constant.

Antique Mirrors

Source: See photo (PDF) (4 pp, 117K) Exit EPA of reflecting layer of mercury on glass.

Purpose: To add a reflecting layer.

Antique Organs

Source: A mercury manometer is connected to the bellows. Air is sent from the bellows, causing the reeds to vibrate and making a sound. Learn more about antique organs Exit EPA

Purpose: The manometer regulates the pressure of air from the bellows.

Antique Barometers

Spill Risk: Yes, during shipment or if broken.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

Antique Clock Pendulums

Spill Risk: Yes. As a result of rough handling or dropping, the vials may break.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed athousehold hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

Antique Mirrors

Spill Risk: Yes, during transport or resurfacing.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

Antique Organs

Spill Risk: None, if units are intact.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

Appliances (Electric)*:

  • Washing Machines (Lids)
  • Chest Freezers
  • Space Heaters
  • Clothes Dryers

* These items are no longer sold with mercury tilt switches.

Washing Machines (Lids)

Source: Mercury tilt switches, small tubes with electrical contacts at one end of the tubes, can be inside the lids.

Purpose: When the tube inside the lid is tilted, the mercury flows to either end, cutting off the circuit on one end, while opening it on the other side. They often function as on-off switches.

Chest Freezers

Source: Mercury tilt switches may be in the lids.

Purpose: Turn on convenience lights.

Space Heaters

Source: Tilt switches may be inside the heaters.

Purpose: Shut off heaters if heaters tip over.

Spill Risk: Yes, when appliances are shredded by scrap metal recyclers or crushed in landfills.


Recommended Management (for all three appliances):

1. Call your State/local household hazardous waste collection center for advice on recycling/disposal.

2. Call your local appliance recycler.

Appliances (Gas fired)*:

  • Pilot light sensors in gas-fired appliances

*Mercury-containing thermostat probes may be found in several types of older gas-fired appliances that have pilot lights, such as ovens, water heaters, and furnaces.

(This also applies to pool heaters and appliances in some recreational vehicles.)

If there is a question about the mercury content of a metal probe, obtain this information from the manufacturer. See also Northeast Waste Management Officials' Association's (NEWMOA) Interstate Mercury Education & Reduction Clearinghouse's Mercury-Added Products Database. Exit EPA

Source: Pilot light sensors:

Mercury-containing thermostat probes may be present as part of the safety valves that prevent gas flow if the pilot lights are not lit. The metal probe consists of a metal bulb and thin tube attached to a gas-control valve. The bulb of the probe projects into or near the pilot light.

Purpose: The mercury inside the tube expands or contracts to open and shut the valve.

Spill Risk: Yes, when appliances are shredded by scrap metal recyclers or crushed in landfills.

Recommended Management:

1. Call your State/local household hazardous waste collection center for advice on recycling/disposal.

2. Call your local appliance recycler.

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Barometers

Source: Elemental mercury is inside the barometer.

Purpose: Serves as a measurement of atmospheric pressure.

Spill Risk: None, if units are intact.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

Button cell batteries in some:

  • Calculators
  • Hearing aids
  • Toys
  • Pacemakers
  • Watches

View more information about mercury-containing batteries on the Consumer Products: Related Links page.

Also view Maine's report Exit EPA on mercury use in button cell batteries.

Source: Inside the battery cells.

Manganese alkaline zinc air and silver oxide button cell batteries contain mercury. Lithium button cell batteries do not.

Purpose: Mercury is found in protective film around zinc in the cells. Mercury prevents battery rupture from production of hydrogen gas.

Spill Risk: None, if units are intact.

Even with rough play and a toy breaking apart, it is extremely rare that a mercury-containing button cell battery would break open.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

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Clothes irons*:

*No longer sold with mercury tilt switches.

Source: Mercury tilt switches, small tubes with electrical contacts at one end of the tubes were used inside the irons.

Purpose: When the tube is tilted, the mercury flows to either end cutting off the circuit on one end, while opening it on the other side. They often function as on/off switches.

Spill Risk: None, if units are intact.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

Electronics:

  • Desktop liquid crystal display (LCD) monitors
  • Laptop LCD monitors
  • Laptop screen shutoffs
  • Backlight display screens

Purpose: Mercury in screens and monitors: Visible light is produced when the mercury is electrically energized.

Mercury tilt switches in laptop screen shutoffs: When the laptop monitors are tilted, the mercury flows to either end cutting off the circuit on one end, while opening it on the other side. They often function as on/off switches.

Spill Risk: None, if units are intact.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

Gas flow or gas pressure regulators*:

* Installed before 1961.

View Fact Sheet on Mercury Gas Regulators from EPA Region 7.

Before You Tear it Down, Get the Mercury Out (PDF) (2 pp, 445K) from EPA Region 5.

Source: Some homes that were built prior to 1961 contain mercury regulators attached to the gas meters. These devices do not create spill risks while in service, but some mercury spills have occurred during removal.

Purpose: Aids in maintaining pressure to regulate flow of natural gas.

Spill Risk: Yes, exists during removal.

Recommended Management: These devices should be removed only by qualified gas company personnel or trained plumbers. Contact your local gas company to ensure proper removal of these devices in homes that are to be demolished. In other homes, contact the gas company so that the devices will be removed properly when the meters need to be replaced.

Heating and cooling systems

View Mercury Alert for Plumbing, Heating and Cooling Contractors Association from EPA Region 7.

Source: Some units may contain mercury switches within the heating or cooling units.

Purpose: Units contain thermostats for climate control devices and switches to start/shut off systems.

Spill Risk: Yes, exists during unit repair or replacement or during disposal.

Recommended Management: Consumers do not need to pull mercury switches from appliances. Appliance recyclers will, in most cases, do this work.

Honeywell heat generators/mercury seal generators

View the factsheet Before You Tear it Down, Get the Mercury Out (PDF) (2 pp, 445K) from EPA Region 5.

Source: These devices contain several fluid ounces of mercury.

Purpose: These devices were invented in 1904 to improve home hot-water heating systems.

Spill Risk: Mercury spills can occur as a result of improper removal of these devices. A spill can require a significant cleanup effort.

Recommended Management: Prior to demolition, these units should be removed in a manner that ensures no mercury is released. Remove the unit intact, then place the entire unit into a large plastic bag, always keeping the unit in a vertical position. Take the unit to a local household hazardous waste facility or hire a professional environmental consulting company, both of which have trained personnel who can handle and dispose of mercury appropriately.

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Jewelry*:

* Certain necklaces imported from Mexico have glass pendants that contain mercury. The pendants come in various shapes such as hearts, bottles, balls, saber teeth, and chili-peppers.

View information from the State of Washington Exit EPA about the use of mercury in necklaces.

Source: The mercury is a silver clump of liquid in the hollow glass pendant.

Purpose: Ornamental

Spill Risk: Yes, if glass vessels leak.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

Lamps/Light bulbs*:

  • Fluorescent bulbs
  • Compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs)
  • High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps
  • Ultraviolet lamps
  • Neon lights

*Over the past 20 years, the mercury content in lamps has declined steadily. They are however, among the few mercury-containing products for which non-mercury substitutes do not exist.

Source: Compact fluorescent bulbs (CFLs), fluorescent, germicidal, high-intensity discharge, ultraviolet lamps, and neon lights contain internal mercury vapor.

The amount of mercury in lamps varies widely, depending on the type of lamp. Some fluorescent lamps have as little as 3.5 mg mercury, but some neon lights have as much as 100 mg.

Purpose: Visible light is produced when the mercury is electrically energized.

Spill Risk: Yes, exists if lamps are broken and when disposed.

What to do if a fluorescent lamp breaks.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed.

Light switches*:

  • Silent light switches

* Mercury light switches are sometimes encountered in older buildings. These switches were manufactured prior to 1991.

These devices look like typical wall switches, but they do not make the audible "click" sound when activated.

Source: Liquid mercury is in a metal encased glass button.

Purpose: The mercury completes the electrical circuit when the switch is lifted up, submerging an electrical contact point and closing the circuit.

Spill Risk: Yes, exists during removal.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

Mercury: Liquid elemental mercury*:


*Some states restrict the sale of elemental mercury. For example, NH law requires that providers of elemental mercury send completed certification forms, signed by the receiving organizations, to the state. Receiving organizations must use the mercury for medical, dental, research or manufacturing uses only.

Source: Usually in jars or vials.

Many people may also have containers of elemental mercury in their homes left over from science projects or from historic uses, such as gold panning.

Purpose: Cultural use/other uses. Examples- Sprinkling mercury in homes and cars, burning mercury in candles, and mixing mercury with perfume.

Spill Risk: Yes.

Recommended Management:

If you have elemental mercury in your home, you need to exercise extreme caution with it and package it to prevent any leaks or spills.

Liquid elemental mercury needs to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

Paint (Latex)*:

* Phenylmercuric acetate (PMA) was used as a fungicide in certain latex interior and exterior paints manufactured before September 1991.

EPA cancelled registrations allowing the use of PMA in interior latex paints in August 1990, and for exterior latex paints in September 1991.

View information about addressing indoor environmental concerns during remodeling.

Source: Chemical in paint.

Purpose: Mercury was used as an agent to prevent bacterial growth.

Spill Risk: Yes, for cans of liquid paint.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

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Pesticides*:

* By 1995, all U.S. registrations for mercury-containing pesticides had been cancelled.

Source: Mercury compounds in pesticides.

Purpose: Mercury compounds were used as fungicides and as biocides.

Spill Risk: None

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding waste pesticide collection programs.

Plumbing:

  • Sewer pipes
  • Sink traps
  • Sumps

Source: Mercury may be present in sewer pipes, sumps and sink traps from the past use of mercury, for example, in a chemistry set or used in a science project. The mercury may also have entered the pipes when items were broken, discarded or spilled in sinks. Mercury in plumbing can settle at a low point such as a sump or sink trap and remain in the plumbing for many years.

Purpose : No purpose. Deposited over time.

Spill Risk: Yes, exists during removal.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed by professionals. Contact your local or state health or environmental agency for information on qualified professionals.

Security systems:

  • Building
  • Fire alarm boxes

Source: Mercury tilt switches are in the systems. The switches are small tubes with electrical contacts at one end of the tubes.

Purpose: When the tube is tilted, the mercury flows to either end cutting off the circuit on one end, while opening it on the other side. They often function as on/off switches.

Spill Risk: None, if units are intact.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

Shoes*:

  • Children's light-up shoes

* No longer sold.

Purpose: The liquid mercury triggers an electrical connection that activates a light.

Spill Risk: None, if items are intact.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

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Sporting Equipment:*

  • Archery bows
  • Fishing tip-up lights
  • Sporting gun recoil units


Archery Bows

Source: Mercury is in stabilizers of the 6 inch and 8 ounce, or 10 inch and 11 ounce "Neutralizer" models.

Purpose: To stabilize bows.

Fishing tip-up lights

Source: Switches in lights.

Purpose: Mercury switches indicate when fish are on the lines.

Sporting gun recoil units

Source: Inside the recoil units.

Purpose: Mercury is used in recoil reduction systems to absorb and dampen shock.

Archery Bows

Spill Risk: Yes, exists if items are broken.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

Fishing tip-up lights

Spill Risk: None, if units are intact.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

Sporting gun recoil units

Spill Risk: No, if the unit is intact.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

Television Sets (TVs)*:

*No longer made with mercury tilt switches.

Source: Mercury tilt switches are in older TVs. They are small tubes with electrical contacts at one end of the tubes.

Purpose: When the TV is tilted, the mercury flows to either end cutting off the circuit on one end, while opening it on the other side. They often function as on/off switches.

Spill Risk: None, if units are intact.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

Thermometers:

  • Body temperature thermometers
  • Clerget sugar test thermometers

Body temperature thermometers

Source: The bulbs at the bottom of glass thermometers contain mercury which is silver in color. Typical fever thermometers contain about 0.5 grams of mercury each.

Purpose: Registers temperature changes.

Clerget sugar test thermometers

Source:

Purpose: Registers blood sugar changes.

Spill Risk: Yes, exists if items are broken.

What to do if a mercury thermometer breaks.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed or exchanged for mercury-free thermometers at a household hazardous waste collection center. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

Also see the NEWMOA's National Mercury Reduction Programs Database. Exit EPA

Thermostats*:

*Mercury switches are used in some thermostats.

View Fact Sheet on Mercury Thermostats from EPA Region 7.

View the Northeast Waste Management Officials' Association's "Review and Assessment of Thermostat Recycling Activities in the Northeast" (PDF) (June 2008). (27 pp, 119K, About PDF) Exit EPA

Before You Tear it Down, Get the Mercury Out (PDF) (2 pp, 445K) from EPA Region 5.

Non-mercury thermostats are commercially available.

Source: Temperature control devices may have mercury tilt switches. Mercury is contained in one or more glass bulbs inside the thermostat.

Purpose: A temperature-sensitive mercury tilt switch controls the flow of electricity to heating and cooling systems.

Spill Risk: Yes, exists if items are broken.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

Tilt Switches in:

  • Silent light switches
  • Space heaters
  • Thermostats
  • TVs
  • Lids of washing machines
  • Chest freezers

Source: Mercury tilt switches are small tubes with electrical contacts at one end of the tubes.

Purpose: When the tube is tilted, the mercury flows to either end cutting off the circuit on one end, while opening it on the other side. They often function as on/off switches.

Spill Risk: None, if units are intact.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

With regard to washer machines, chest freezers and space heaters, call your local appliance recycler.

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Medical Pharmaceutical Products

Product Type Source /Purpose of Mercury Spill Risk / Recommended Management

Antibiotics

Source: Mercury compounds are found in thimerosal.

Purpose: As a preservative.

View more information about the use of thimerosal in lab reagents and vaccines.

Disposal: Follow the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's guidance on Disposal of Unused Medicines

Contact lens solution

Source: In solution.

Purpose: May contain mercury containing preservatives: thimerosal, phenylmercuric acetate, or phenylmercuric nitrate

Disposal: No special handling.

Dental Amalgam*:

*Dental amalgam ("silver fillings") is used to fill cavities in teeth. Dentists currently use prepared capsules that are mixed prior to application, and do not use elemental mercury. Clinical labs at some dental schools may have used elemental mercury in the past to prepare dental amalgam. Elemental mercury may also be present in some dental offices from previous use.

Not all dental restorative options use mercury.

See the Food and Drug Administrations': "Questions and Answers on Dental Amalgam" and "September 6 & 7, 2006 Dental Products Panels Material."

Source: Dental amalgam consists of approximately 50% mercury. The remaining 50% is comprised of silver, copper and tin. Dental amalgam waste consists of excess amalgam from the preparation of fillings and from filling and tooth removals.

Purpose: The mercury in amalgam binds with the other metals to produce a material that can be shaped to fill dental cavities, and is resistant to temperature changes and the effects of chewing.

Spill Risk: No, except if elemental mercury is in dental offices or dental school clinics from previous amalgam preparations.

Recommended Management: Used dental amalgam should be sent to a waste handler who will ensure that the mercury is properly recycled.

View more information about best mercury management practices for dental amalgam.

Diuretics*:

*Some diuretics are manufactured with Mersalyl and mercury salts.

Source: In diuretics.

Purpose: As a preservative.

Disposal: No special handling.

Ear and Eye Drops/Eye Ointment*:

*Some ear and eye drops are manufactured with ethyl mercury thiosalicylic acid.

Source: In the drops or ointments.

Purpose: As a preservative.

Disposal: No special handling.

Hemorrhoid relief ointment

Source: In the ointments.

Purpose: As a preservative.

Disposal: No special handling.

Mercurochrome

Source: In solution.

Purpose: Antibacterial agent.

Disposal: No special handling.
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Nasal Spray

Source: In solution.

Purpose: As a preservative.

Disposal: No special handling.

Skin cream*:

*Most skin creams do not contain mercury compounds. Those that do are generally imported from outside the U.S. and are sold as skin lightening or freckle creams.

Use of skin cream that contains mercury can lead to skin rashes or poisoning because mercury can be absorbed through the skin.

Source: In cream.

Purpose: Mercury compounds are used as bleaching agents.

Disposal: No special handling.

Sphygmomanometers (Blood pressure cuffs)

Source: In glass tubes.

Purpose: Elemental mercury in glass tubes is used to register blood pressure changes.

Spill Risk: There is a risk of spills if broken.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed at household hazardous waste collection centers. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

Thermometers:

  • Body temperature thermometers
  • Clerget sugar test thermometers

Body temperature thermometers

Source: The bulbs at the bottom of glass thermometers contain mercury which is silver in color. Typical fever thermometers contain about 0.5 grams of mercury each.

Purpose: Registers temperature changes.

Clerget sugar test thermometers

Source:

Purpose: Registers blood sugar changes.

Spill Risk: Yes, exists if items are broken.

What to do if a mercury thermometer breaks.

Recommended Management: These products need to be properly disposed or exchanged for mercury-free thermometers at a household hazardous waste collection center. Consult your local or state collection program regarding items taken.

Also see the NEWMOA's National Mercury Reduction Programs Database. Exit EPA

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Consumer Products: Automotive Parts

Automotive Parts*:

  • Convenience light switches
  • Heated car rear windows
  • Tilt switches
  • Acceleration sensors for air bags and seatbelts
  • School bus braking systems

* Most car manufacturers are designing new models without mercury switches.

* Some cars manufactured prior to 2003 contained mercury switches.

*ELVS' (End of Life Vehicle Solutions Exit EPAWeb site contains information on which manufacturers/models have mercury-containing convenience lights and anti-lock braking systems. See NEWMOA's Mercury-Added Products Database Exit EPAfor information on which cars have mercury-containing navigation screens and high intensity discharge (HID) headlights.

Source: In pre-2003 cars, switches in:

  • Trunks and hoods
  • Heated car rear windows
  • Acceleration sensors for air bags and seatbelts
  • Some anti-lock braking systems (ABS systems)

Mercury switches are in new cars' navigation screens and high intensity discharge (HID) headlights.

Purpose: To conduct electricity.

Spill Risk: Small. in daily driving. The risk of mercury releases to the environment exists if mercury switches are not removed by dismantlers before vehicles are shredded.

Recommended Management: These switches need to be properly removed by dismantlers.

Recovery Programs:

Wheel Balancers*:

*Wheel balancers can be installed on trucks, motorhomes and motorcycles. (3/4 ton and up.)

Source: Mercury-containing wheel balancers are installed behind vehicles' wheel assemblies.

Purpose: To eliminate vibration, increase tire life, eliminate tire cupping, improve roadability, decrease fuel consumption and reduce maintenance cost.

Spill Risk: No, if the unit is intact.

Recommended Management: Send discarded items to manufacturer for mercury recycling.

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Commercial Products

Mercury can be an active ingredient, a preservative or a chemical introduced in the manufacture of one of the ingredients in a chemical formulation. The difficulty of identifying which chemicals and reagents contain mercury is compounded by the fact that Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) are not required to list the hazardous components of a product unless that component is present at a level of >1% (0.1% for carcinogens).
Commercial Medical Products
  • Antibiotics
  • Batteries (Medical use)
  • Alarms, Blood Analyzers
  • Blood Pressure Cuffs (Sphygmomanometers)
  • Defibrillators
  • Hearing Aids
  • Pacemakers
  • Pumps
  • Scales
  • Telemetry transmitters
  • Ultrasound
  • Ventilators
  • Electron Microscope
  • Gastrointestinal Tubes: (Cantor tubes, Esophageal tubes, Feeding tubes, Miller Abbott tubes)
  • Vaccines: (hemophilus, hepatitis, rabies, tetanus, influenza, diphtheria, pertussis)
  • Dental Amalgam
Commercial Electric Products
  • Tilt switches
  • Air flow/fan limit control
  • Building security systems
  • Chest freezer lids
  • Fire alarm box switches
  • Laptop computer screen shutoffs
  • Pressure controls
  • Silent light switches
  • Temperature control:
    (Incubator/water bath thermometers)
  • Maximum/minimum thermometers
  • National Institute of Standards and Technology calibration thermometers
  • Tapered bulb thermometers
  • Devices utilizing a printed wire board (e.g., laptop computers)
  • Energy Production (coal-fired)
  • Flow meters
  • Generators
  • Sequential Multi-Channel Autoanalyzers
  • Speedometer Systems
  • Sphygmomanometers
  • Pressure Gauges: (Barometers
    Manometers, Vacuum gauges)
  • Reed relays
  • Plunger or displacement relays
  • DC watt hour meters (Duncan)
  • Computer monitors
  • Lead Analyzer electrodes
  • Cathode-ray oscilloscopes
Commercial Manufacturing Products
  • Ohlamacher
  • Camco
  • Immu-sal
  • Phenolic mercury
  • Carbol-fuchin stain
  • Mercurochrome
  • Phenylmercuric Acetate
  • Carnoy-Lebrun
  • Mercury (II) chloride
  • Cesium Internal Standard
  • Mercury (II) oxide, Stabilur® Tablets
  • Channing's solution
  • Mercury chloride
  • Takata's reagent
  • Golgi's
  • Mercury iodine
  • ThimerosalT
  • Gomori's
  • Mercury nitrate
  • Zenker's solution
  • Hitachi® Chem Analyzer reagent
  • Coatings
Commercial Chemical Products
  • Acetic Acid
  • Ammonium reagent/Stone analysis kit
  • Antibody test kits
  • Antigens
  • Buffers,
  • Calibration kits
  • Calibrators
  • Chloride
  • Diluents
  • Enzyme Immunoassay test kits
  • Enzyme tracers
  • Ethanol
  • Extraction enzymes
  • Fixatives
  • Hematology reagents
  • Hormones
  • Immunoelectrophoresis reagents
  • Immunofixationphoresis reagents: Immu-sal
  • Negative control kits
  • Phenobarbital reagent
  • Phenytoin reagent
  • Positive control kits
  • Potassium hydroxide
  • Rabbit serum
  • Shigella bacteria
  • Sodium hypochlorite
  • Sulfuric acid
  • ThimerosalT
  • Tracer kits
  • Urine analysis reagents
  • Acetate
  • Gram iodine stain
  • Million's reagent
  • Alum
  • Helly
  • MucolexxT
  • B5 Fixative
  • Nesser's solution
Commercial Construction Products
  • Rubber flooring in gymnasiums (1970s).
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