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Hudson River PCBs Superfund Site

Cleanup Plans and Documents

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Roadmap - Completed and Future Documents

Roadmap ? Completed and Future Documents

View Roadmap [280 KB, 1 pp]

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Current / Anticipated Work

The second, and final, phase of the Hudson River dredging project began June 6, 2011. Dredging occurs 24 hours a day, six days a week from May to November, when the Champlain Canal is open for the season.

During the initial years of the project, the areas targeted for dredging were close together and generally extended from shoreline to shoreline. In the remaining years, as the project continues to move southward towards Troy, the dredging areas will be further apart. Several areas will also need to be dredged that are logistically challenging, including those near dams, shallow areas behind islands and the land-locked section of river located between the Thompson Island Dam and Fort Miller Dam.

In 2014 (Phase 2, Year 4), dredging operations will resume south of Schuylerville, NY and proceed south (see map of targeted dredge areas). Dredging will also be conducted in the “land-locked” section of river located between the Thompson Island Dam and the Fort Miller Dam. During the dredging season, mechanical dredges mounted on deck barges use environmental clamshell buckets to place dredged sediment into barges. Tugboats push the loaded barges to a dewatering and sediment-processing facility located on the Champlain Canal in Fort Edward, NY. In the land-locked section of river, where direct water-transport of loaded barges to the processing facility isn’t possible due to the presence of dams at its northern and southern ends, the loaded barges will be pushed by tugboat to a trans-loading area on a narrow sliver of land on the east shoreline of the river, south of the Thompson Island Dam. Once there, the material in the barge will be off-loaded onto land and then loaded into another barge in the “land-cut,” which is a water filled channel that serves as a detour around the two dams in the river. After this transfer occurs, the loaded barges will be pushed by tugboat upriver to the processing facility. More information about GE’s approach to dredging the land-locked section of river is available here.

Once the barges loaded with dredged sediment arrive at the processing facility, debris and water is removed. The coarse material is then separated from the fine sediment that contains most of the PCB contamination. The coarse material is staged in a pile before it is transported off-site by train to a PCB-approved landfill. The remaining sediment is pumped to the dewatering facility where large filter presses squeeze water from the sediment. The water is treated to strict water quality standards before it is released back into the Champlain Canal. The remaining sediment and debris is loaded onto railcars and transported by train to the permitted, off-site disposal facilities.

Before the start of the 2012 dredging season, improvements were made at the processing facility to support operations and increase productivity. These improvements included the expansion of the coarse material staging area and construction of a second barge unloading and processing area. A second gravity thickener was also added to prepare the sediment before it is processed through the filter presses.

Performance standards were developed for the project by EPA to ensure that environmental quality is not impacted and that the cleanup continues to be protective for the workers and surrounding communities. Information about daily activities, and performance standard monitoring data is available on the Hudson Dredging Data website.



Site Description and History

EPA Barge Lock ThroughBetween 1947 and 1977, an estimated 1.3 million pounds of PCBs entered the Hudson River from two GE capacitor manufacturing plants located in Fort Edward and Hudson Falls, NY.

The PCB contamination led to EPA listing 200 miles of the Hudson as a Superfund Site in 1984. Fish consumption advisories, which affect both commercial and recreational fishing, were also enacted. Elevated levels of PCBs have also been found in wildlife, including birds that live along the river’s shoreline.

The Hudson River PCBs Superfund Site encompasses a nearly 200-mile stretch of the Hudson River in eastern New York State from Hudson Falls, New York to the Battery in New York City and includes communities in fourteen New York counties and two counties in New Jersey. The site is divided into the Upper Hudson River, which runs from Hudson Falls to the Federal Dam at Troy (a distance of approximately 40 miles), and the Lower Hudson River, which runs from the Federal Dam at Troy to the southern tip of Manhattan at the Battery in New York City. For purposes of this project, EPA further divided the Upper Hudson River area into three main sections known as River Section 1 (from the former Fort Edward Dam to the Thompson Island Dam), River Section 2 (from the Thompson Island Dam to the Northumberland Dam), and River Section 3 (from the Northumberland Dam to the Federal Dam in Troy). Within the river sections, dredging is conducted in areas of approximately five acres each, called “certification units” (CUs).

In February 2002, EPA issued a Record of Decision calling for the targeted environmental dredging and removal of approximately 2.65 million cubic yards of PCB-contaminated sediment from the Upper Hudson River, from Fort Edward to Troy, New York.
Dredge areas were identified using the results of a multi-year sediment sampling program conducted by GE that began in 2002 and generated more than 50,000 sediment samples taken from the bottom of the Upper Hudson River. Some additional sediment sampling will occur as the project progresses to better define the areas to be dredged.

The first, year-long phase of dredging occurred between May and November 2009. During Phase 1, approximately 283,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediment was removed from a six-mile stretch of the Upper Hudson River near the town of Fort Edward, NY.

Phase 2 began in June 2011, after an evaluation of data collected during the first phase of dredging by an independent group of scientific experts. After the review, improvements were made to the project design. During the second phase, more contaminated sediment is captured in fewer passes of the dredges. EPA also established a limit on the amount of capping that can occur to isolate remaining PCBs.

Both phases of the cleanup are being conducted by GE under the terms of a November 2006 legal agreement. In December 2010, GE agreed to conduct and pay for the second phase of cleanup. All remaining dredging and related work is being conducted by GE with EPA oversight.

Phase 2 dredging is expected to take two more years to complete and targets approximately 2.4 million cubic yards of PCB-contaminated sediment.

Some areas are repopulated with aquatic plants in the growing season following the year in which the area is dredged. The habitat replacement program is designed to limit impacts on habitats from the dredging project and includes reconstruction, replacement, and/or stabilization of river bottom, submerged aquatic vegetation, wetlands, and shoreline areas.

In addition, an evaluation of on-land and in-river cultural resources is being conducted to ensure that archaeological resources of significance are adequately protected during the dredging project. The New York State Museum is the repository for any archaeological artifacts that are recovered and items may be exhibited locally, in project-area communities.

As part of the Hudson River cleanup, the floodplains (low-lying shoreline areas) of the Upper Hudson River are also being evaluated for the presence of PCBs. Since 2002, EPA and GE have collected approximately 5,000 soil samples to date from floodplain areas of the Hudson between Fort Edward and Troy, NY. Sampling is expected to continue in 2014. The results of the soil sampling will be used as part of a comprehensive study (Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study) that is planned for the future. This study will include an evaluation of human and ecological risks and potential long-term clean up solutions.


Phase 2 Documents

Click on each document title below for a description and link to the document.

The Administrative Record and major design documents are also available at the Hudson River PCBs Superfund Site Information Repositories.

Project Design Documents

Phase 2 Final Design Reports

This report includes the final details and specifications for Phase 2 dredging. It includes comprehensive descriptions of the processes and systems to be used both in the river and at the on-land sediment processing and dewatering facility.
2011 Final Design Report (FDR) (April 2011) [2.2 MB, 163 pp]
2012 Final Design Report (FDR) (May 2012)
[2.8 MB, 140 pp]
2013 Final Design Report (FDR) (April 2013) [7.2 MB, 103 pp]

Phase 2 Dredge Area Delineation Report (December 2007)

In January 2008, EPA approved the Phase 2 Dredge Area Delineation report (Phase 2 DAD), prepared by General Electric Company which identified the areas that will be dredged during the second phase of the project. The Phase 2 DAD Report was used by GE to design Phase 2 of the dredging project.
Phase 2 Dredge Area Delineation Report (December 2007) [1.6 MB, 124 pp]

Intermediate Design Report for Phase 2 Dredging (May 2008)

This report evaluates the existing technologies identified in the Preliminary Design Report for effective implementation of the Hudson River project. It addresses the requirements of EPA's Quality of Life and Engineering Performance Standards, and incorporates results of the sediment-sampling program and the treatability studies. This report also specifies the following for Phase 2: dredging technology and equipment to be used; measures that will be used to control PCB resuspension; how water will be extracted from dredged material and treated at the on-land sediment processing and water treatment facility; and how sediments will be transported to final disposal locations.
Intermediate Design Report for Phase 2 Dredging (May 2008) [977 KB, 171 pp]

 

Work Plans

Statement of Work for Remedial Action (December 2010)

Phase 2 Statement of Work (SOW) (December 2010) [291 KB, 45 pp]

Remedial Action Work Plan for Phase 2 Dredging and Facility Operations

This work plan describes the steps in the design process, including the development of plans to remove sediments from the river bottom; process, dewater and treat dredged materials; transport and dispose of dewatered sediments; and replace habitat in dredged area.
2011 Remedial Action Work Plan (RAWP) (April 2011) [2.8 MB, 61 pp]

2012 Remedial Action Work Plan (RAWP) (April 2012) [2.5 MB, 68 pp]

2013 Remedial Action Work Plan (RAWP) (June 2013) [7.4 MB, 78 pp]
 

Performance Standards

Performance Standards for Phase 2 (December 2010)

EPA issued performance standards for Phase 2 dredging based on the knowledge gained during Phase 1 and input from the Peer Review Panel.
Phase 2 Engineering Performance Standards (EPS) (December 2010) [824 KB, 124 pp]
Phase 2 Quality of Life Performance Standards (QoLPS) (December 2010) [35 KB, 6 pp]

Fact Sheets:

Engineering Performance Standards General Overview, Fall 2011 [817 KB, 4 pp]
Quality of Life Performance Standards General Overview, Fall 2011 Update [570 KB, 4 pp]

Community Health and Safety Plans

Community Health and Safety Plan

This plan describes key health and safety personnel for Phase 2 and include detailed health and safety plans to protect surrounding communities. It also describes how local emergency personnel and the community will be contacted if an emergency has occurred. Additionally, this report includes measures that will be implemented to insure local residents, communities, and water supplies are protected.

Phase 2 Community Health and Safety Plan (CHASP) for 2011: Appendix F of the Remedial Action Work Plan is the Phase 2 CHASP for 2011: (April 2011) [2.7 MB, 119 pp]

Phase 2 Community Health and Safety Plan (CHASP) for 2012: Appendix F of the Remedial Action Work Plan is the Phase 2 CHASP for 2012: (April 2012) [4 MB, 120 pp]

Phase 2 Community Health and Safety Plan (CHASP) for 2013: Appendix F of the Remedial Action Work Plan is the Phase 2 CHASP for 2013: (April 2013) [9.5 MB, 131 pp]

Phase 2 Community Health and Safety Plan (CHASP) for 2014 (April 2014) [13 MB, 150 pp]

Cultural Resources

Hudson River PCBs Superfund Site Archaeological Data Recovery of Underwater Resource U-2

This report documents the May 2009 investigation of the Resource U-2 shipwreck site located in the Hudson River, near Rogers Island in Fort Edward, NY. The study was conducted as part of the cultural resources activities that have been undertaken to address potential impacts to cultural and archaeological resources from the dredging project.
Archaeological Data Recovery of Underwater Resource U-2 (May 2009) [13 MB, 134 pp]

Habitat Restoration

Habitat Delineation Report (December 2008)

This report documents the existing range of habitat conditions in the river and along the shoreline in the areas targeted for dredging in Phase 2. The work will support the design of habitat replacement and reconstruction following dredging.
Habitat Delineation Report (December 2008) [30 MB, 141 pp]
Appendix C [263 MB, 105 pp]

Habitat Assessment Report for Phase 2 Dredging (June 2009)

This report documents the existing range of habitat conditions in the river and along the shoreline in the areas targeted for dredging in Phase 2. The work will support the design of habitat replacement and reconstruction following dredging.
Habitat Assessment Report for Phase 2 Dredging (June 2009) [17 MB, 320 pp]

*Appendix 1 is the Habitat Assessment Report for Phase 1 Dredge Areas


Phase 1 Evaluation

After completing the first phase of dredging PCB-contaminated sediment in the upper Hudson River, in March 2010 EPA and GE each released a detailed technical assessment of the work to a panel of independent scientific experts for their review. The EPA report detailed the effectiveness of the first phase of dredging, as well as the challenges encountered during the first dredging season. It also laid out the Agency's proposed modifications to the engineering performance standards for dredging resuspension, residuals, and productivity for the second phase of the project.

The panel was asked to consider certain questions relating to the engineering performance standards and the monitoring program for Phase 2 of the project. EPA’s report included the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s observations and recommendations as an appendix.

The peer review panel publicly discussed its views on the EPA and GE reports in early May 2010 and the members' individual views on the questions were compiled into a report. The Draft Hudson River Peer Review Report [1.4 MB, 100] underwent factual review by EPA and GE and was provided to the public for informational purposes in mid-August 2010. EPA received the Final Hudson River Peer Review Report from the panel in September 2010.

During the independent peer review, EPA also sought public comments on the EPA and GE reports. EPA accepted public comment on the Phase 1 Evaluation Reports until April 26, 2010. In response to requests from the public, EPA provided additional time for the public to submit comments on the Addendum to EPA's report. Public comments on the Addendum were accepted until May 17, 2010. These comments were provided to the panel members for consideration during their evaluation.

In December 2010, EPA issued performance standards for Phase 2 dredging based on the knowledge gained during Phase 1 and input from the peer review panel.  The second phase of dredging began on June 6, 2011. 

Phase 1 Evaluation Report (March 2010)

EPA Phase 1 Evaluation Report:
Report Text [1 MB, 293 pp]
Executive Summary [461 KB, 20 pp]
Entire Report, Including Tables and Figures [17.5 MB, 716 pp]
Report Appendices [33.5 MB, 931 pp]
*Please see subsections below for Appendix II-D & E.
Appendix II-D CU-01 through CU-06 [44.8 MB, 680 pp]
Appendix II-D CU-07 through CU-18 [53 MB, 444 pp]
Appendix II-E CU-01 through CU-02 [50 MB, 44 pp]
Appendix II-E CU-03 through CU-06 [57 MB, 62 pp]
Appendix II-E CU-07 through CU-18 [58 MB, 63 pp]
Addendum to the Phase 1 Evaluation Report [7.5 MB, 211 pp]

Phase 1 Peer Review Documents (2010)

Peer Review Documents:
Peer Review of Phase 1 Dredging Final Report (September 2010) [888 KB, 102 pp]
Changes Made in Final Hudson River Phase 1 Dredging Peer Review Report Matrix [8 KB, 2 pp]
Draft Hudson River Peer Review Report [1.4 MB, 100 pp]
EPA Response to Draft Hudson River EPS Peer Review Report [7.5 MB, 17 pp]


Peer Review Introductory Session
On February 17 and 18, 2010, the Phase 1 Peer Review Panel for the Hudson River dredging project held an Introductory Session in Saratoga Springs, NY at the Gideon Putnam Hotel. The focus of this meeting was for the Peer Review Panel to hear presentations from U.S. EPA and General Electric Co. regarding information gained during Phase 1 of the dredging project. Evaluation reports prepared by U.S. EPA and GE were reviewed with respect to the Engineering Performance Standards (resuspension of PCBs, residual contamination, and production rate).
Meeting Presentations:
Meeting Introduction [407 KB, 24 pp]
Resuspension [4.53 MB, 37 pp]
Residuals [772 KB, 20 pp]
Productivity [1.67 MB, 19 pp]
Meeting Transcripts:
02/17/10 (Resuspension, Residuals) [2 MB, 481 pp]
02/18/10 (Productivity) [1 MB, 352 pp]


MAY PEER REVIEW PANEL MEETING
The second meeting of the Hudson River Peer Review Panel was held on May 4, 5 and 6, 2010 at the Queensbury Hotel in Glens Falls, NY. During this meeting, the Peer Review Panel members publicly discussed and considered their individual responses to the charge questions that were presented to the panel.
Meeting Presentations:
Meeting Introduction/Overview [412 KB, 26 pp]
Peer Review Meeting - Day 1 [4 MB, 74 pp]
Peer Review Meeting - Day 2 [760 KB, 27 pp]
Peer Review Meeting - Day 3 [2 MB, 17 pp]
Meeting Transcripts:
05/04/10 Peer Review Meeting Transcript - Day 1 [594 KB, 239 pp]
05/05/10 Peer Review Meeting Transcript - Day 2 [488 KB, 340 pp]
05/06/10 Peer Review Meeting Transcript - Day 3 [410 KB, 285 pp]



Phase 1 Dredging & Design Documents

Facility Siting
In order to implement the cleanup of PCB-contaminated sediment in the Upper Hudson, a processing facility(ies) needed to be constructed to remove the water from the dredged sediment and to prepare the material for transport to approved disposal facilities. After evaluating a series of locations, with extensive public input, the Energy Park site in the Town of Fort Edward was selected. The main operations that occur at the facility include: unloading of dredged sediment from barges to the facility; processing and dewatering of sediment; water treatment; and railcar loading for the transport of dredged sediment to permitted off-site disposal facilities.

Sediment Processing/Transfer Facilities Concept Document (December 2002)

This report identifies the criteria and process that were used to identify and select the site of the sediment dewatering facility.
Sediment Processing/Transfer Facilities Concept Document (December 2002) [1 MB, 34 pp]

Sediment Processing/Transfer Facilities Technical Memorandum: Identification of Preliminary Sites (June 2003)

This report provides the results of the evaluations and screening used to identify the 24 preliminary candidate sites for the sediment dewatering facility.
Sediment Processing/Transfer Facilities Technical Memorandum: Identification of Preliminary Sites (June 2003) [16 MB, 108 pp]

Draft Facility Siting Report (April 2004)

This report summarizes the facility siting process from the initial Concept Document to the identification of Suitable and Recommended sites. The document describes how the final candidate sites were evaluated and selected. This report also presents conclusions about the feasibility of water-based facilities.
Draft Facility Siting Report (April 2004)

Facility Siting Report (December 2004)

This report is an update to the Draft Facility Siting Report that was released for public review and comment in April 2004. The Facility Siting Report summarizes the facility siting process from the initial Concept Document to the identification of Suitable and Recommended sites. The report also describes how final candidate sites were evaluated and selected.  The final report includes comments received during the public comment period on the Draft Facility Siting Report.
Facility Siting Report (December 2004)

Baseline Monitoring
Baseline monitoring is used to document river conditions before dredging begins and provides the data needed to support development of dredging and post-dredging monitoring programs.
Baseline monitoring continues during the dredging off season and was conducted throughout 2010, between the end of Phase 1 and the start of Phase 2.

Baseline Monitoring Program Scoping Document (August 2003)

This report describes pre-dredging or "baseline" fish and water quality monitoring that would be used to evaluate whether dredging activities are achieving EPA's engineering performance standards and to track long-term recovery trends.
Baseline Monitoring Program Scoping Document (August 2003) [215 KB, 17 pp]

Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) for the Hudson River PCBs Site Baseline Monitoring Program (May 2004)

Baseline monitoring is meant to document the condition of the river prior to dredging and to provide the data needed to support development of the dredging and post-dredging monitoring programs. The river conditions of primary interest include PCB concentrations in the river water, PCB mass load from the Upper Hudson River to the Lower Hudson River, and PCB concentrations in fish. This Quality Assurance Project Plan is consistent with the approved Baseline Monitoring Program Scoping Document, August 2003, which defines the goals and details of the Baseline Monitoring Program.
Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) for the Hudson River PCBs Site Baseline Monitoring Program (May 2004)
Text of Report [3.6 MB, 162 pp]
Figures [4.7 MB, 15 pp]
Tables [1 MB, 52 pp]
Appendices [10 MB, 899 pp]

Baseline Monitoring Program Data Summary Report for 2006 (March 2007)

This report describes pre-dredging or "baseline" conditions, including PCB concentrations, in the river's fish and water, following an analysis of data from 2004. These "baseline" conditions will be compared to river conditions during dredging. In addition, these data will be used in the future to help track the river's recovery after dredging is completed.
Baseline Monitoring Program Data Summary Report for 2006 (March 2007) [18 MB, 322 pp]

Design Documents
The design reports for the Hudson River dredging project describe dredging processes, locations, and equipment.

Preliminary Design Report (April 2004)

The report conceptually describes Phase 1 and Phase 2 dredging processes, from removal of sediment to disposal. It evaluates the full spectrum of existing dredging technologies, including dredging equipment; resuspension control measures; material handling and processing; dewatering and water treatment processes; transport to disposal locations; composition of backfill and capping materials; and habitat replacement. The report also includes design criteria based on EPA's draft performance standards, and other EPA criteria identified in the ROD (e.g., no transport of processed sediment by truck; dredged material to be disposed outside the Hudson River Valley).
Preliminary Design Report (April 2004)

Target Area Identification Report for Phase 1 Dredging/EPA's Selection of Phase 1 Dredge Areas (September 2004)

The report compares the general areas of the Upper Hudson River that were candidates for dredging in Phase 1, and identified the specific areas proposed by GE for inclusion in Phase 1. EPA used this document to identify areas to be dredged during Phase 1.
Target Area Identification Report for Phase 1 Dredging/EPA’s Selection of Phase 1 Dredge Areas (September 2004)

Dredge Area Delineation Report for Phase 1 Dredging (February 2005)

This report identifies areas that would be dredged in the three locations for Phase 1 dredging: (1) the northern part of River Section 1; (2) near Griffin Island in River Section 1; and (3) near Northumberland in River Section 2. This report describes where and to what depth, within these areas, dredging would occur.
Dredge Area Delineation Report for Phase 1 Dredging (February 2005)

Phase 1 Intermediate Design Report (August 2005)

This report evaluates the existing technologies identified in the Preliminary Design Report for effective implementation of the Hudson River project. It addresses the requirements of EPA's Quality of Life and Engineering Performance Standards, and incorporates the results of the sediment-sampling program and the treatability studies. This report also specifies the following for Phase 1: dredging technology and equipment to be used; any measures that will be used to control PCB resuspension; how water will be extracted from dredged material and treated at the on-land sediment processing and water treatment facility; and how sediments will be transported to final disposal locations.
Phase 1 Intermediate Design Report (August 2005)
Phase 1 Intermediate Design Report Hudson River PCBs Superfund Site Treatability Studies Report (August 2005) [433 KB, 40 pp]

Final Design Report for Phase 1 Dredging (March 2006)

This report includes the final details and specifications for Phase 1 of the dredging project. It includes comprehensive descriptions of the processes and systems that would be used both in the river and at the on-land sediment processing and dewatering facility.
Final Design Report for Phase 1 Dredging (March 2006) [1.1 MB, 103 pp]
Phase 1 FDR Attachment A [1.5 MB, 174 pp]
Phase 1 FDR Attachment B [4 MB, 105 pp]
Phase 1 FDR Attachment C [266 KB, 15 pp] | C-A [6.7 MB, 4 pp] | C-B [934 KB, 95 pp] | C-C [11.8 MB, 253 pp]
Phase 1 FDR Attachment D [298 KB, 18 pp]
Phase 1 FDR Attachment E [373 KB, 30 pp]
Phase 1 FDR Attachment F [9.9 MB, 106 pp]
Phase 1 FDR Attachment G [69 KB, 13 pp]
Phase 1 FDR Attachment H [4.25 MB, 68 pp] | Part 2 [14 MB, 163 pp]
Phase 1 FDR Attachment I [3.2 MB, 103 pp]
Phase 1 FDR Attachment J [4.5 MB, 56 pp]
Phase 1 FDR Attachment K [490 KB, 4 pp]
Phase 1 FDR Tables [490 KB, 46 pp]
Phase 1 FDR Appendix 7 [913 KB, 78 pp]

Work Plans
The work plans that have been prepared for the Hudson River cleanup explain decision-making processes, steps involved in project design, and how monitoring will be conducted.

Remedial Design Work Plan (August 2003)

This work plan describes the steps in the design process, including the development of plans to remove sediments from the river bottom; process, dewater, and treat dredged materials; transport and dispose of dewatered sediments; and replace habitat in dredged areas.
Remedial Design Work Plan (August 2003) [1.2 MB, 84 pp]

Treatability Studies Work Plan (February 2004)

This work plan describes the studies used to help select equipment for sediment dewatering and handling and treatment of water that is removed from the sediments. These studies also provide information that would be used in refining procedures for loading and unloading barges; handling unprocessed sediment; and staging and loading dredged material and backfill.
Treatability Studies Work Plan (February 2004)
Transmittal Letter [122 KB, 2 pp]
Text and Tables [775 KB, 84 pp]
Figures [3.9 MB, 20 pp]
Appendices [13 MB, 321 pp]

Supplemental Engineering Data Collection Work Plan (SEDC Work Plan) (February 2004)

The SEDC Work Plan describes the technical approach for collecting additional engineering data to assist in the design of the dredging project. The SEDC Work Plan provides the framework for field activities to be conducted by General Electric Company during the Year 2 Supplemental Engineering Data Collection Program (Year 2 SEDC Program) to support the development of the project design, as described in the Remedial Design Work Plan.
Supplemental Engineering Data Collection Work Plan (SEDC Work Plan) (February 2004)
Transmittal Letter [125 KB, 2 pp]
Text and Tables [928 KB, 84 pp]
Appendices A-C [2.9 MB, 128 pp]
Figures 1-6 [2.4 MB, 6 pp]
Figures 7-12 [3 MB, 6 pp]

Phase 1 Remedial Action Monitoring Program Quality Assurance Project Plan (February and May 2009)

This plan describes the methods that will be used to monitor the Phase 1 dredging operations so that those operations can be compared to EPA’s performance standards.
Phase 1 Remedial Action Monitoring Program Quality Assurance Project Plan (February and May 2009) [1.1 MB, 344 pp]
Phase 1 RAM QAPP Tables and Figures [8.8 MB, 181 pp]
Phase 1 RAM QAPP Appendix 1 [30 MB, 2012 pp]

Remedial Action Work Plan for Phase 1 Dredging and Facility Operations (May 2009 revision)

This work plan describes the steps in the design process, including the development of plans to remove sediments from the river bottom; process, dewater and treat dredged materials; transport and dispose of dewatered sediments; and replace habitat in dredged areas.
Remedial Action Work Plan for Phase 1 Dredging and Facility Operations (May 2009 revision) [2.2 MB, 75 pp]
Remedial Action Health and Safety Plan [1.8 MB, 205 pp]
Phase 1 RAWP and Facility Operations Appendix A [1.4 MB, 113 pp]
Phase 1 RAWP and Facility Operations Appendix B [1.4 MB, 86 pp]
Phase 1 RAWP and Facility Operations Appendix C [1.8 MB, 50 pp]
Phase 1 RAWP and Facility Operations Appendix D [561 KB, 125 pp]
Phase 1 RAWP and Facility Operations Appendix E [1.25 MB, 22 pp]

Engineering Performance Standards

Engineering performance standards [817 KB, 4 pp] are technical requirements that help to ensure that the dredging of the Upper Hudson is done safely, and meets human health and environmental protection objectives.

Performance standards were created to address dredging-related resuspension of sediments from the river bottom, residual levels of PCBs remaining after dredging occurs, and the productivity of the dredging work.

During dredging, an extensive water quality monitoring program measures PCB concentrations at upstream, near-field, mid-field, and far-field locations. The performance standard for dredging sets a resuspension level of 500 parts per trillion (ppt) total PCBs – the EPA drinking water standard under the Safe Drinking Water Act.

For more information about the standards, and to view performance standard monitoring data during dredging, visit www.hudsondredgingdata.com

Engineering Performance Standards (April 2004)

This 2004 report describes the final Engineering Performance Standards that were designed to ensure the cleanup meets the objectives for protecting people's health and the environment and does not cause adverse health or environmental impacts. Engineering performance standards were developed for dredging-related resuspension (to limit downstream transport of PCB-contaminated dredging material); dredging residuals (to evaluate the concentration of PCBs remaining in residual material remaining in dredged areas); and dredging productivity (designed to keep the dredging work on schedule). The draft Engineering Performance Standards were released for public review and comment in May of 2003 and for peer review and comment in October 2003. A report summarizing the findings of the peer review and EPA's responses is included with the Final Engineering Performance Standards.

In 2010, EPA revised the performance standards for the second phase of the project based on the knowledge gained during Phase 1 and input from the peer review panel. See Phase 2 Documents.

Engineering Performance Standards (EPS) Information
Basics

EPS Home
Peer Review
Presentations
Documents
Draft EPS Report and Executive Summary-Public Review Copy (May 2003)
Draft EPS– Peer Review Copy
(October 2003)
Public Comments on Draft EEPS and EPA Responses (October 2003)
Final EPS (April 2004)

Quality of Life Performance Standards

The February 2002 Record of Decision required the development of performance standards that set specific goals and requirements for the project. The quality of life performance standards are intended to reduce the effects of dredging; sediment processing, transferring and dewatering; and support operations on the nearby community. EPA reviews project design plans for consistency with the quality of life standards, and oversees cleanup activities to ensure they are met. Standards have been developed for air quality, noise, lighting, odor, and navigation. Monitoring information and data is available on EPA’s Hudson Dredging Data Website.

Quality of Life Performance Standards (May 2004)

This 2004 document describes the Final Quality of Life Performance Standards intended to reduce the effects of the dredging, sediment processing, transfer, and dewatering, and support operations on people, businesses, recreation, and community activities in the project area. Performance Standards were developed for air quality, noise, lighting, odor, and navigation. This document reflects comments received from the public and the design team.
In 2010, EPA revised the performance standards for the second phase of the project based on the knowledge gained during Phase 1 and input from the peer review panel. See Phase 2 Documents.

Final Quality of Life Performance Standards (May 2004)

Table of Contents
Summary of Changes from the Draft Version to the Final Version

Draft Quality of Life Performance Standards
Table of Contents
Quality of Life Performance Standards Public Presentation (January 2004) [1.6 MB, 20 pp]

Sediment Sampling

Dredge areas were identified using the results of a multi-year sediment core-sampling program conducted by GE that began in 2002 and generated more than 50,000 sediment samples. Sampling is ongoing to better define the depth of contamination in Phase 2 dredge areas.

Design Support Sediment Sampling and Analysis Program Field Sampling Plan for Year 1 (July 2002)

This report, which provided the data needed to design the remedy, describes the 2002 sediment-sampling program, the methods used for sediment characterization, data management and evaluation, and reports submitted to EPA.
Design Support Sediment Sampling and Analysis Program Field Sampling Plan for Year 1 (July 2002)

Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP): Design Support Sediment Sampling and Analysis Program (October 2002-Revision 4)

The Quality Assurance Project Plan for the sediment sampling program includes a detailed description of the data quality objectives – essentially, why the data are being collected, how they will be used, what they will be compared to, and how they will be interpreted - as well as provisions necessary to ensure that appropriate analytical techniques are selected. Also included in the QAPP are descriptions of sampling methods, analytical and testing methods, sampling locations and frequency of sampling.

Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) For the Hudson River PCBs Site: Design Support Sediment Sampling and Analysis Program October 2002-Revision 4
Data Summary Report for Candidate Phase 1 Areas (September 2004)

This report presents the results of the activities performed during 2002 and 2003 as part of the Sediment Sampling and Analysis Program in areas designated as candidates for Phase 1 dredging.
Data Summary Report for Candidate Phase 1 Areas (September 2004) [1.5 MB, 190 pp]

Community Health and Safety Plans
The Community Health and Safety Plans (CHASP) addresses potential health and safety issues for the public associated with the dredging project. The CHASP Identifies potential hazards to the community during work in-river, on-shore, and at the processing facility and the control of these potential hazards. Several planning meetings with residents and emergency responders were held to refine the plan. The CHASP will be updated for each dredging year moving forward.

Sediment Sampling Community Health and Safety Plan (September 2002)

This plan describes the key health and safety personnel for Sediment Sampling and includes detailed health and safety plans, including contingency plans, that were designed to protect surrounding communities.  It also describes how local emergency personnel and the community would be contacted if an emergency occurred. Additionally, this report includes what measures would be implemented to ensure local residents, communities, and water supplies are protected.
Sediment Sampling Community Health and Safety Plan (September 2002) [826 KB, 28 pp]

Revised Community Health and Safety Plan (June 2003)

This report was developed to ensure that the fieldwork associated with design activities was done in a manner that was safe for the public and the environment.
Revised Community Health and Safety Plan (June 2003) [2 MB, 30 pp]

Phase 1 Remedial Action Community Health and Safety Plan, Rev. 2 (Feb. 2009)

This plan describes key health and safety personnel for Phase 1 and details health and safety plasn to protect surrounding communities. It also describes how local emergency personnel and the community would be contacted if an emergency occurred. Additionally, this report discusses what measures would be implemented to ensure local residents, communities, and water supplies are protected. Revisions to the April 2007 document were issued in February and May 2009.
Phase 1 Remedial Action Community Health and Safety Plan, Rev. 2 (Feb. 2009) [2.5 MB, 130 pp]

Cultural Resources
An evaluation of on-land and in-river cultural resources is being conducted to identify archaeological resources of significance so that they can be adequately protected during the dredging project. Prior to Phase 1 dredging, EPA prepared a Cultural and Archeological Resource Assessment [1 MB, 29 pp] which identified a number of cultural resources located within 2,000 feet of the banks of the Hudson River. Some of these resources are listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. During Phase 1 dredging, a series of surveys were completed and the archeological resources discovered were either avoided or were extensively investigated.

Cultural and archeological resource assessments have begun, both in-water and on-land, for Phase 2 dredge areas. These assessments have been completed within the Upper Thompson Pool, where on-land archaeological sites were discovered along the shoreline. The effect of dredging in the vicinity of these sites will be mitigated such that any potential impacts to these sites by the dredging will be minimized. EPA also has a protocol for addressing the issue of unanticipated cultural remains that are discovered during dredging operations.

EPA works with several consulting parties, including the NY State Historic Preservation Office, NY State Museum, as well as local and regional historic societies, to ensure that local concerns about historical artifacts remain an integral part of the project’s design and implementation. While the New York State Museum is the formal repository for most artifacts recovered, items discovered are expected to be exhibited locally, in project-area communities.

Cultural and Archaeological Resource Assessment Work Plan (August 2003)

This report is a plan that describes how cultural or archaeological resources or artifacts would be identified and evaluated to ensure that that they are adequately protected during the project.
Cultural and Archaeological Resource Assessment Work Plan (August 2003) [1 MB, 29 pp]

Habitat Restoration
Some areas are being repopulated with aquatic plants in the growing season following the year in which the area is dredged. The habitat replacement program is designed to limit impacts on habitats from the dredging project and includes reconstruction, replacement, and/or stabilization of river bottom, submerged aquatic vegetation, wetlands, and shoreline areas. Prior to dredging, shoreline and in-river habitats were surveyed to identify the types of habitat that exist within and around the Upper Hudson River dredge areas, and planting plans were developed for wetland and submerged aquatic vegetation habitat. In both Phase 1 and Phase 2 (Year 1), as dredge areas were backfilled and/or capped, shoreline areas were stabilized and plants and seed mixes were installed in some areas. These areas are being surveyed and monitored to determine if reconstruction areas are developing as expected.  After several years of monitoring, the habitats will be measured against various benchmarks and success criteria to verify that they met the habitat reconstruction objectives and that the habitat functions are assessed.

Habitat Delineation and Assessment Work Plan (August 2003)

This report develops a plan for determining the types and locations of aquatic and wildlife habitat.
Habitat Delineation and Assessment Work Plan (August 2003) [639 KB, 96 pp]

Supplemental Habitat Assessment Work Plan (September 2005)

The Supplemental Habitat Assessment Work Plan presents the approach and locations for collecting additional habitat assessment data to assist in the design of the dredging project.

Supplemental Habitat Assessment Work Plan (September 2005)
Text of Report [244 KB, 26 pp]
Figures [15 MB, 20 pp]
Attachments [239 KB, 38 pp]

Habitat Assessment Report for Phase 1 Candidate Areas (November 2005)

The Habitat Assessment Report for Candidate Phase 1 Areas (Phase 1 Habitat Assessment Report) documents the habitat assessment results for candidate Phase 1 dredging areas that were assessed in 2003 and 2004. Habitat assessment information will be used to develop the basis of design for habitat replacement and reconstruction in Phase 1 areas. The Phase 1 Habitat Assessment Report provides the foundation for implementing the habitat replacement and reconstruction program for the Phase 1 dredging areas. Habitat assessments followed the scope of work outlined in the Habitat Delineation and Assessment Work Plan.
Habitat Assessment Report for Candidate Phase 1 Areas [697 KB, 75 pp] (November 23, 2005)
Habitat Assessment Report Final Phase Appendices [19 MB, 175 pp] (November 23, 2005)

The following Habitat Assessment Report figures are available on request: romanowski.larisa@epa.gov
Figure 1 Upper Hudson River
Figure 2 Sampling Station Locations for Habitat Assessments in the Phase 1 Areas
Figure 3 Sampling Station Locations for Habitat Assessments in the Phase 1 Areas
Figure 4 Sampling Station Locations for Habitat Assessments in the Phase 1 Areas
Figure 5 Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and Percent Fines at Phase 1 Areas and Assessment Stations

Floodplains Investigation

In 2002, EPA signed a Record of Decision (ROD) for the cleanup of the Hudson River PCBs Superfund site. The ROD stated that the floodplains, or low-lying shoreline areas, of the Hudson River would be evaluated. The ROD also states that concerns related to possible exposure of residents and ecological receptors to PCBs in the floodplain must be evaluated. Since the signing of the ROD, EPA and GE have collected approximately 5,000 soil samples from floodplain areas of the Hudson from Fort Edward to Troy, NY. The results of the soil sampling will be used as part of a comprehensive study (Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study) that is planned for the future. This study will include an evaluation of human and ecological risks and potential long-term cleanup solutions. Floodplain sampling is expected to continue in 2012.

EPA DredgingPrevious years’ results have been reported to EPA and distributed to private landowners. Based on those results, GE, with oversight from EPA has taken actions to reduce the potential for people to be exposed to PCBs in floodplains soils. These actions have been taken where elevated levels of PCBs have been detected in areas that people use on private and some public properties. The actions have consisted primarily of the installation of cover material to prevent direct contact with PCBs or placement of signage to warn people that PCBs are present. GE and EPA will continue to evaluate the necessity of taking additional actions to address potential exposures as the project moves forward.

Floodplain Soil Sampling Summary Report (August 2005)

The Floodplain Soil Sampling Summary Report details rationale for sampling in floodplains, the implementation of the sampling plan, and summarizes the tasks performed. The focus area of the sampling was a 12-mile-long river reach extending from Fort Edward to Schuylerville, NY. The data gathered during the floodplain soil sampling provide a preliminary indication as to the potential nature and extent of PCB contamination in floodplain soils throughout the 12-mile study area of the Upper Hudson. Results may be useful in the design of future studies that may be necessary to fully delineate the PCB contamination.
Floodplain Soil Sampling Summary Report (August 2005)
Text Only [645 KB, 25 pp]
Appendices (excluding F) [112 MB, 221 pp]
Appendix A Sediment Textural Classification Plates
Appendix B Sample Collection Data
Appendix C Total PCB Data
Appendix D TOC and Grain Size Data
Appendix E Transect PCB Results/Selected Aerial Photos [5.3 MB, 47 pp]
Appendix F Hudson River PCB Results/Maps
(Appendix F is available upon request by contacting romanowski.larisa@epa.gov)
Appendix G Soil Sampling Data Sheets
Appendix H USGS River Flow Data

Data Summary Report Floodplain Data Collection Activities Upper Hudson River (March 2006)

The Data Summary Report documents the results of the floodplain data collection activities conducted by the General Electric Company (GE) from June to November, 2005 along the Upper Hudson River. The floodplain data collection activities included field reconnaissance, floodplain soil sampling and laboratory analysis, and topographic mapping.

Data Summary Report Floodplain Data Collection Activities Upper Hudson River (March 2006)
Floodplain Data Summary Report [159 KB, 18 pp]
Tables [130 KB, 38 pp]
Upper Hudson River Floodplain Field Sampling Plan (September 2008)

In 2008, EPA and GE reached agreement on carrying out the Upper Hudson floodplain sampling program. The agreement, embodied in an Administrative Order on Consent (AOC), provided for soil sampling at approximately 350 properties within the Upper Hudson floodplain and initiated the first phase of the floodplains remedial investigation. The agreement also required GE to map human use and ecological use areas in the floodplain areas to identify areas where removal of contaminated soils may be needed. GE pays for costs incurred by EPA in overseeing the work performed under this agreement.
Upper Hudson River Floodplain Field Sampling Plan (September 2008)
Field Sampling Plan [194 KB, 50 pp]
Appendix A [9.6 KB, 1 pg]
Tables [21 KB, 5 pp]
Letter August 4, 2008 [167 KB, 1 pg]

2009 Final Data Summary Report, Floodplain Sampling Activities (March 2010)

This Data Summary Report (DSR) presents the results of the Upper Hudson River (UHR) floodplains soil sampling activities completed by GE in 2009. The purpose was to collect additional floodplains soil data to further characterize PCB concentrations on certain properties previously sampled by GE and/or EPA in 2008, and newly identified and previously un-sampled potential human use areas.
2009 Final Data Summary Report, Floodplain Sampling Activities (March 2010) [152 KB, 46 pp]

Field Sampling Plan, Upper Hudson River Floodplain Deposition Sampling Program (May 2010)

This Field Sampling Plan details the procedures for identifying sediment deposition areas within the Upper Hudson River floodplain study area and determining the PCB concentrations within those areas under the Floodplain Deposition Sampling Program. The FDSP was designed to sample sediment deposits in the Upper Hudson River floodplains during seasonal high-flow events when potentially contaminated sediments can be re-deposited elsewhere in the river system, e.g. the floodplains.
Field Sampling Plan, Upper Hudson River Floodplain Deposition Sampling Program (May 2010) [2.8 MB, 162 pp]

2010 Field Sampling Plan Addendum, Upper Hudson River Flooplain Deposition Sampling Program (August 2010)

This Addendum to the 2008 Upper Hudson River Floodplain Field Sampling Plan describes the collection of additional data in 2010 to further characterize PCB concentrations in certain areas of the Upper Hudson River floodplains. These areas were selected based on previous sampling results, and as part of the overall Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for the Upper Hudson River floodplain. The 2010 floodplain sampling and laboratory analyses will be completed in accordance with this document and the methods and procedures described in the 2008 Upper Hudson River Floodplain Field Sampling Plan and the 2009 Field Sampling Plan Addendum. Subsequent sampling will be undertaken as appropriate and necessary to complete the full RI/FS.
2010 Field Sampling Plan Addendum, Upper Hudson River Flooplain Deposition Sampling Program (August 2010) [257 KB, 20 pp]

2010 Data Summary Report, Floodplain Soil Sampling Activities (February 2011)

This Data Summary Report presents the results of the Upper Hudson River floodplain soil sampling activities completed by GE in June and October 2010. The objectives of the 2010 sampling activities were to collect additional floodplain soil data on certain properties to support planning and design of potential 2010 short-term response actions (June 21 to June 22, 2010 sampling event), and to characterize PCB concentrations on certain properties containing previously un-sampled potential human use areas (October 19 to October 22, 2010 sampling event).
2010 Data Summary Report, Floodplain Soil Sampling Activities (February 2011) [102 KB, 22 pp]

Spring 2011 Data Summary Report, Upper Hudson River Floodplain Deposition Sampling Program (October 2011)

This Data Summary Report summarizes the 2011 spring sampling event activities and analytical results for the Upper Hudson River Floodplain Deposition Sampling Program (FDSP). The FDSP was designed to sample sediment deposits in the Upper Hudson River floodplains during seasonal high-flow events when potentially contaminated sediments can be re-deposited elsewhere in the river system, e.g. the floodplains. The spring 2011 sampling event was the second event under this program.  Because flooding in 2011 reached a maximum flow of 48,800 cubic feet per second (cfs), significantly more than normal years, GE and NYSDEC collected additional samples outside the original scope of the FDSP.
Spring 2011 Data Summary Report, Upper Hudson River Floodplain Deposition Sampling Program (October 2011) [2.5 MB, 62 pp]

2011 Field Sampling Plan Addendum, Upper Hudson River Floodplains Data Management and Evaluation (October 2011)

This Addendum to the 2008 Upper Hudson River Floodplain Field Sampling Plan describes the collection of additional data in 2011 to further characterize PCB concentrations in certain areas of the Upper Hudson River floodplains. These areas were selected based on previous sampling results, and as part of the overall Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for the Upper Hudson River floodplain. The 2011 floodplain sampling and laboratory analyses will be completed in accordance with this document and the methods and procedures described in the 2008 Upper Hudson River Floodplain Field Sampling Plan and the 2009 and 2010 Field Sampling Plan Addenda. Subsequent sampling will be undertaken as appropriate and necessary to complete the full RI/FS.
2011 Field Sampling Plan Addendum, Upper Hudson River Floodplains Data Management and Evaluation (October 2011) [327 KB, 22 pp]

Legal Agreements

Sampling Administrative Order on Consent (July 2002)

General Electric Company (GE), the potentially responsible party at the Hudson River PCBs Superfund site, signed an AOC with EPA in July 2002 (referred to as the Sampling AOC) [73 KB, 37 pp] to fund and perform sediment sampling as the initial step in the design of the site cleanup (dredging project).
News Release (07/2002)
Sampling Administrative Order on Consent (July 2002) [73 KB, 37 pp]

Design Administrative Order on Consent (August 2003)

In 2003 EPA signed an agreement with General Electric Company (GE) to perform the project design work for the cleanup of PCB-contaminated sediment in the Hudson River. Under the agreement, embodied in an Administrative Order on Consent (AOC) [390 KB, 52 pp], GE develop detailed approaches for removing sediment from the river bottom, transporting and disposing of the material, and replacing the habitat in dredged areas. The company also agreed to pay up to $28 million in partial reimbursement of EPA’s past and future costs associated with the dredging project.

The AOC covers the detailed design of the dredging project, but does not cover the performance of the actual dredging work itself. The AOC includes work plans for the design of the dredging work, baseline monitoring, cultural and archeological resources assessment, and habitat delineation and assessment.
Design Administrative Order on Consent (AOC) August 2003
News Release (09/2003)

Floodplain Administrative Order on Consent for Removal Action (July 2007)

The agreement, embodied in an Administrative Order on Consent (AOC), requires GE to reduce exposure to PCBs in four general areas along the Upper Hudson River where elevated levels of PCBs in floodplain soils could potentially present an unacceptable risk to public health and the environment. The settlement agreement requires GE to install warning signs, cover soils to prevent exposure to PCBs, and periodically monitor the areas and maintain them. These measures are temporary pending completion of comprehensive studies of floodplain areas and selection of final floodplains remedy.

Press Release [22 KB, 1 pp]
Floodplain Administrative Order on Consent for Removal Action [525 KB, 36 pp]

Consent Decree (October 2005)

The October 2005 agreement with GE includes provisions that cover Phase 1 dredging, the construction of the sediment transfer/processing facility, the independent peer review of Phase 1, and the remaining dredging work.
Documents
Consent Decree [372 KB, 83 pp]
Appendix A Record of Decision
Appendix B Statement of Work [2.9 MB, 271 pp]
Appendix C Environmental Protection Easement and Declaration of Restrictive Convenants [89 KB, 9 pp]
Appendix D Description of Sediment Processing/Transfer Facility Properties [606 KB, 4 pp]
Fact Sheet (October 2005) [76 KB, 2 pp]
Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree [170 KB, 1 pp]
U.S. Court Seeks Approval on Dredging Agreement with GE (May 2006)

Access Order for Waterline Construction (September 2008)

To ensure that contingencies were in place to protect drinking water supplies prior to the start of Phase 1 dredging, EPA issued orders to the town of Halfmoon, New York and the Water Commissioners of the town of Waterford to gain access needed to construct a water line to carry drinking water from Troy to Halfmoon and to the town of Waterford, New York. The new water line is providing the towns with an alternate water source during the dredging project.
Access Order for Waterline Construction (September 2008)
Order Issued to The Town of Halfmoon [474 KB, 11 pp]
Order Issued to The Water Commissioners of the Town of Waterford [586 KB, 13 pp]
Press Release

Floodplain Sampling Administrative Order on Consent (AOC) (September 2008)

The agreement, embodied in an Administrative Order on Consent (AOC), provided for soil sampling at approximately 350 properties within the Upper Hudson floodplain. The agreement also required GE to map human use and ecological use areas in those floodplain areas to identify areas where removal of contaminated soils may be needed. GE will pay for costs incurred by EPA in overseeing the work performed under this agreement.
Floodplain Sampling Administrative Order on Consent (AOC) (September 2008)
Floodplain Agreement [1.5 MB, 30 pp]
Letter August 4, 2008 [167 KB, 1 pg]

Consent Decree Modification No. 1 (March 2009)

The United States filed the first modification, Consent Decree Modification No. 1, with the Court on March 23, 2009. The modification of the 2006 consent decree required GE to pay a portion of the costs of protecting the Waterford, Halfmoon, and Stillwater, New York water supplies during dredging, and to improve its program for monitoring water quality and further protect the Waterford and Halfmoon water supplies.
Consent Decree Modification No. 1 (March 2009)
Press Release
Attachment to Consent Decree Modification No. 1 [196 KB, 37 pp]
Consent Decree Modification No.1 [5.03 MB, 12 pp]
Consent Decree Fact Sheet [80 KB, 2 pp]

Consent Decree Modification No. 2 (August 2011)

On August 15, 2011 the U.S. Department of Justice filed in United States District Court a second modification to the Consent Decree between the United States and General Electric Company (GE) regarding the cleanup of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the Hudson River. Consent Decree Modification No. 2 revises certain provisions of the Consent Decree to address EPA’s December 17, 2010 decision on changes to the project for Phase 2 and makes adjustments to administrative requirements of the Consent Decree.
Consent Decree Modification No. 2 (August 2011)
Consent Decree Modification (CD Mod) No. 2 [481 KB, 11 pp]
CD Mod Cover Letter [189 KB, 3 pp]
Appendix Documents:
EPA's 12/17/10 letter to GE regarding Phase 2 Standards [1.2 MB, 3 pp]
Phase 2 Engineering Performance Standards [471 KB, 89, pp]
Phase 2 Engineering Performance Standards Table and Figures [1.3 MB, 40 pp]
Quality of Life Performance Standards [66 KB, 6 pp]
December 2010 Statement of Work (SOW) [1.3 MB, 251 pp]

Record of Decision and Responsiveness Summary

The February 2002 Record of Decision (ROD) calls for targeted environmental dredging and removal of approximately 2.65 million cubic yards of PCB-contaminated sediment from a 40-mile stretch of the Upper Hudson. In the ROD, EPA selected a plan that addresses the risks to people and the environment associated with PCBs in the sediments of the Upper Hudson River. The actions in the Upper Hudson will lower the risks to people, fish, and wildlife in the Lower Hudson.

Record of Decision

Record of Decision (February 2002)
Transcripts to Post ROD Meetings
Record of Decision (February 2002)
Administrative Record Index of Documents Organized by File Structure
Administrative Record Index of Documents Organized by Updates

Responsiveness Summary

Responsiveness Summary
EPA released the Proposed Plan for the Hudson River PCBs Superfund Site for public comment on December 12, 2000. Due to numerous requests by the public, the comment period was extended to April 17, 2001. By the conclusion of the public comment period, EPA received nearly 73,000 separate, individual comments on the Proposed Plan. Each comment is provided in Appendix D to the Responsiveness Summary, along with tables identifying authors and showing the relationships between authors, identified significant comments and master comments.

Each of the comment letters and other documents was reviewed, and individual significant comments within each comment document were identified. Similar or related comments were combined into 274 “master comments” in various topical areas capturing the significant issues raised by each of the source comments. A response was prepared for (and is presented immediately following) each of the master comments, drawing from material presented in the Proposed Plan, the FS, or other previous project reports, other literature, remedial projects and individuals, and EPA policy, as well as additional technical analyses performed specifically to address comments or questions raised during the public comment period.

Master comments are organized according to topical areas in Book 1 of the Responsiveness Summary and are assigned a three- or six-digit identification number to identify the master comment, the associated response, and any companion tables and figures throughout the Responsiveness Summary.

Methodologies used and results obtained from additional technical analyses are presented as “white papers” in Book 2 [1.2 MB, 395 pp] of the Responsiveness Summary. White papers cover a variety of topical areas, providing more in-depth analysis and supporting detail concerning topics addressed in various comments.
Responsiveness Summary

Site Reassessment and Feasibility Study

Site Reassessment
In December 1989, EPA announced its decision to initiate a detailed Reassessment Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (Reassessment RI/FS) of EPA’s 1984 interim No Action decision for the Upper Hudson River sediments. This was prompted by the five-year review required by CERCLA, technical advances in sediment dredging and treatment/destruction technologies, as well as a request by New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) for a re-examination of the 1984 decision. The Reassessment RI/FS was divided into three phases:

  • Phase 1, consisting primarily of a review of existing data, was completed in August 1991.
  • Phase 2, which included the collection and analysis of new data as well as modeling studies and human health and ecological risk assessments and peer reviews, began in December 1991 and concluded in November 2000.
  • Phase 3, also known as the FS, began in September 1998.
Feasibility Study and Reassessment Reports

Feasibility Study and Reassessment Reports
The Feasibility Study was released concurrently with the Proposed Plan for the Hudson River PCBs site in December 2000.
Reassessment Schedule - table of major reports and associated dates.
Links to Reassessment Reports - a list of all Reassessment documents available on this web site.
Peer Review - information on the peer review process for the Reassessment, with links to charges, summary reports, and responses to the reviewers comments, as available.

Community Involvement Plan

The Community Involvement Plan (CIP) is the foundation for EPA’s Superfund Community Involvement Program for the Hudson River PCBs Superfund Site. The CIP specifies the outreach activities that EPA will use to address community concerns and expectations. It helps the Community Involvement Coordinator, who serves as the liaison between community members and Hudson River site team members and other agency officials, to advise them on effective and appropriate ways to inform and engage the public. The CIP is a public document, readily available to the community, that community members can use to make sure that EPA is responsive to their needs and concerns.

2009 Hudson River PCBs Site Community Involvement Plan

EPA has established the following goals for the overall community involvement program.

  • Provide the public with accurate, timely, and understandable information and/or access to the information needed to understand the project as it moves forward,
  • Provide the public with the opportunity to give informed and meaningful input,
  • Ensure adequate time and opportunity to provide input and for that input to be considered before final decisions on major issues are made,
  • Respect and give full consideration to community input, and
  • Assist the public in understanding the project decision-making process during project design and cleanup and the community’s role in that process

EPA's Community Involvement Plan (CIP) for the Hudson River PCBs Superfund site identifies tools and activities that will be used to address community concerns. Together they serve as a toolkit for EPA’s public participation program at the site and provide the public with myriad opportunities for involvement in the project. The CIP provides detailed descriptions of these tools and identifies how they will be used to address community concerns and promote public involvement in the project. The CIP also contains a glossary, references, and a series of appendices designed to serve as resources for both EPA and the community. Specific sections include the EPA and project team, local government, and media contacts, and directions on how to obtain additional Superfund and EPA information.

A draft version of the plan [3.1 MB, 151 pp] was released to the public for review and comment on April 24, 2003. It proposed that a Community Advisory Group, or CAG, be formed to create a forum through which members of community and stakeholder groups along the entire site can discuss their viewpoints as design and cleanup work progresses. In response to public comments, EPA modified the proposed CIP in a number of areas, foremost among them being the increasing of membership of the Community Advisory Group (CAG) from 17 to 25. The CIP was updated in 2009 in anticipation of the start of dredging.

Throughout project design and implementation, EPA will focus efforts on getting public input and providing information on those decisions and activities that have the greatest potential impact on the community and on the big-picture issues that are most important to the public.

2009 Hudson River PCBs Site Community Involvement Plan [6.2 MB, 180 pp]

Five Year Reviews

First Five-Year Review Report for Hudson River PCBs Superfund Site
The purpose of the five-year review was to determine whether the remedial actions at the Hudson River PCBs Superfund Site are protective of public health and the environment and are functioning as designed. This five-year review was conducted for the Remnant Deposits and the in-river sediments of the Upper Hudson River. The review was conducted pursuant to Section 121(c) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended, 42 U.S.C. ยงยง 9601 (CERCLA) and 40 CFR 300.430(f)(4)(ii) and undertaken in accordance with the Comprehensive Five-Year Review Guidance, OSWER Directive 9355.7-03B-P (June 2001).
First Five-Year Review Report for Hudson River PCBs Superfund Site [1 MB, 82 pp]
Written Correspondence Received on Five-Year Review [3.45 MB, 74 pp]

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