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2014 Events Archive

    November 12, 2014 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2014 Webinar Series
    Join us for this month's webinar. The webinar features presentations and interactive discussions including recent findings and new developments in children’s environmental health.

    Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Children’s Health
    Some environmental chemicals, including some found in consumer products, have been found to be endocrine disruptors, or endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), which can interfere with the proper functioning of the human endocrine, or hormone system, that guides many aspects of development and body function. Disruptions of the endocrine system can produce adverse developmental, reproductive, neurological and immune system effects. This webinar will focus on contaminants implicated as endocrine-active compounds, as well as mechanisms by which they can affect children’s health. Topics include evidence of adverse effects of bisphenol A (BPA) on the developing female reproductive system, evidence for health effects of children’s exposure to flame retardant chemicals and evidence of maternal, fetal and early childhood health effects from exposure to these and other EDCs, including epigenetic effects. The presenters, all leading scientists in the field, will discuss some of the latest research and provide guidelines for understanding how to prevent potential adverse effects from EDCs and how we can improve the health and well-being of our children.

    Featured Speakers:


    Effects of Bisphenol A on Female Reproduction
    University of Illinois)

    Jodi A. Flaws
    Jodi A. Flaws

    The webinar will provide information on the effects of gestational exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) on the developing female reproductive system. It will also provide information on the transgenerational effects of BPA.


    Maternal and Fetal Exposure to Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals: What we Know and What we can do
    University of California, San Francisco

    Tracey J. Woodruff
    Tracey J. Woodruff

    Dr. Woodruff will present findings on maternal and fetal exposures to endocrine disrupting chemicals, implications for health effects, and methods for synthesizing what is known about exposures to support prevention of harmful chemical exposures.


    Early Exposures to Endocrine Disruptors and Effects on the Epigenome and Health Outcomes Later in Life
    University of Michigan

    Dana Dolinoy
    Dana Dolinoy

    Applying animal models and epidemiology to understand the mechanisms whereby endocrine disruptors cause epigenetic alterations that affect child health and whether nutritional exposures exacerbate or ameliorate these effects.


    Children's Exposure to Flame Retardant Chemicals and Potential Health Effects
    Duke University

    Heather Stapleton
    Heather Stapleton

    This presentation will summarize current research on the measurement of children's exposure to both phased-out and new-use flame retardant chemicals in indoor environments. The potential health effects and toxicities associated with new-use flame retardant chemicals used in furniture will also be discussed.


    Moderator
    University of Michigan

    Marie Lynn Miranda
    Marie Lynn Miranda
     

    November 4, 2014 - 3:00 p.m. EST - Children’s Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers Informational Webinar

    The purpose of this Notice is to inform the extramural research community that a technical assistance webinar will be conducted regarding RFA-ES-14-002 "Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers (P50)". The webinar will occur on November 4, 2014, at 3:00 PM ET. The Webinar will review the purpose and objectives of the FOA, budget preparation and peer review. All prospective applicants are invited to participate.

    Webinar Overview

    October 8, 2014 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2014 Webinar Series
    Join us for this month's webinar. The webinar features presentations and interactive discussions including recent findings and new developments in children’s environmental health.

    Making Science Matter: Connecting Science and Communities
    Overwhelming scientific evidence finds that environmental chemical exposures can adversely impact development and that certain communities can bear a greater burden of environmental exposures. There is a consistent need to connect science and communities, including working in collaboration to ensure the best science can support community goals and to ensure that scientific information is translated and communicated effectively to support community and society wide activities to reduce harmful chemical exposures. This webinar will present an overview of the science and examples of how community and scientists can work together to reduce harmful chemical exposures and improve health.

    Featured Speakers:


    Advancing Environmental Justice Thru Research, Community Organizing, and Advocacy
    WE ACT For Environmental Justice (WE ACT)

    Peggy M. Shepard
    Peggy M. Shepard

    This presentation will highlight the evolution, research and policy processes and outcomes of a community-based participatory research partnership that has had multi-level impacts on health policy concerning diesel bus emissions and related environmental justice issues.


    Community-Based Strategies to Reduce Children’s Second Hand Smoke Exposure
    The Johns Hopkins University

    Cynthia Rand
    Cynthia Rand

    Dr. Rand’s presentation will discuss strategies, outcomes and challenges in doing community-based interventions to reduce children’s exposure to second-hand smoke. Specific examples of home-based and Head Start-based interventions will be discussed.


    Exciting Youth About Air Quality
    National Jewish Health

    Lisa Cicutto
    Lisa Cicutto

    This presentation will highlight activities going on in schools and communities to engage youth related to air quality and health. It will highlight how the work has coordinated, supported and extended the work of community partners.


    Community-based Participatory Research in an Agricultural Community
    University of Washington

    Beti Thompson
    Beti Thompson

    This presentation will highlight the community outreach being done in agricultural communities in Washington State regarding pesticide exposure. Using a CBPR-based approach, the researchers have formed a close relationship with farmworkers to collect data and provide feedback on urinary pesticide metabolites.


    Moderator
    University of California, San Francisco

    Tracey J. Woodruff
    Tracey J. Woodruff
     

    September 10, 2014 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2014 Webinar Series
    Join us for this month's webinar. The webinar features presentations and interactive discussions including recent findings and new developments in children’s environmental health.

    Home Sweet Home: Love it Or List it! Surveying the Risk to Children’s Health Associated with Indoor Environmental Exposures

    In some homes, indoor environmental exposures poses a greater risk to children’s health than outdoor exposures. The webinar provides examples of innovative approaches for understanding the determinants of indoor exposures on children’s health, the mechanisms underlying some of these associations, and methods for intervening and improving the health of children and families who are exposed.


    The Role of the Home Indoor Environment in Asthma
    The Johns Hopkins University

    Gregory Diette
    Gregory Diette

    Pollutants and allergens in the home can worsen asthma. We’ll discuss how to identify them and what can be done to help.


    Everyday Exposures to Bacterial Endotoxins and Asthma in Children
    National Jewish Health

    Andrew H. Liu
    Andrew H. Liu

    We are surrounded by bacteria in our everyday lives. When are they harmful? Can they be helpful? What determines the difference? In this portion of the Webinar, we will explore the nature of bacterial environments in children with asthma, and what we have learned about these environments that might lessen the burden of asthma.


    Predicting, Preventing and Treating Developmental Toxic Risks from Environmental Exposures Using Animal Models of Neurobehavioral Function
    Duke University

    Edward D. Levin
    Edward D. Levin

    Neurobehavioral animal models can provide key information concerning integration of health effects from environmental chemicals, from molecular mechanisms of action to behavioral dysfunction.


    Jennifer Lowry
    Children’s Mercy

    Jennifer Lowry
    Jennifer Lowry

    The patient in your clinic is more than what you see. Social determinants and the health of the environment should be considered in all patients in our clinics.


    Moderator
    Duke University

    Bernard Fuemmeler
    Bernard Fuemmeler
     

    August 13, 2014 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2014 Webinar Series
    Join us for this month's webinar: Environmental Exposures and Neurodevelopmental Health Outcomes

    This webinar will discuss the role of environmental developmental outcomes and the need to sort out the complexity and dynamics of environmental exposure. The two talks will highlight work on POPs as well as episodic tobacco smoke exposures. We will look at two key areas of neurodevelopmental interest: Autism and ADHD. Mechanisms of immune response, as well as epigenetic changes will be explored. Lessons learned across these areas will be shared.


    The Environment and the Immune System in Autism Spectrum Disorders
    University of California, Davis

    Judy Van de Water, Ph.D.
    Judy Van de Water, Ph.D.

    What you will learn:

    This presentation will cover the current research regarding the effects of persistent organic pollutants on immune function as it relates to behavior in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). It will cover the differential as well as the global effects of POPs such as BDE-49 on the immune response, and the association of this outcome with various co-morbidities associated with ASD.


    Epigenetic Links Between Secondhand Smoke Exposure and ADHDs
    Duke University

    Susan K. Murphy, Ph.D.
    Susan K. Murphy, Ph.D.

    What you will learn:

    This presentation will describe the NICHES Children's Center at Duke and our research efforts to investigate the relationship between tobacco smoke exposure during pregnancy and epigenetic changes in genes implicated in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.


    Discussion Moderator
    University of Washington

    Thomas M. Burbacher, Ph.D.
    Thomas M. Burbacher, Ph.D.

     

    July 9, 2014 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2014 Webinar Series
    This month's webinar: Unequal and Unhealthy: How Co-Exposures to Psychosocial and Physical Environmental Stressors Interact to Cause Health Disparities

    In this webinar, four distinguished speakers discuss how combined exposure to psychosocial stressors (such as racial discrimination and poverty) and physical environmental factors (such as air pollution, chemicals, diet and allergens) impacts child health and development.  Participants will learn: 1) how segregation, poverty and the legacy of racism intersect to create unhealthy environments for children; 2) how the timing of co-exposures to psychosocial stressors and physical environmental factors plays an important role in chronic disease programming; and 3) How lessons from the local level could help determine core principles and other decisions to help protect vulnerable children and their families.


    Place Matters as a Social Determinant of Health
    W. K. Kellogg Foundation

    Gail Christopher, D.N.
    Gail Christopher, D.N.
     

    What you will learn:

    The presentation explores how racial segregations, concentrated poverty and the legacy of structural racism intersect to create unhealthy environments for children, and vulnerable populations. Program interventions and policy changes are highlighted.


    Psychological stress & chronic disease programmings
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

    Rosalind J. Wright, M.D., M.H.S.
    Rosalind J. Wright, M.D., M.H.S.
     

    What you will learn:

    The presentation explores the role of psychosocial stressors and chronic disease programming emphasizing the importance of timing of exposure and co-exposures. It also looks at how stress may contribute to health disparities and underscore the role of socioeconomic status and/or race and ethnicity.


    Health Departments and the Environmental Protection Agency - A Synergistic Approach to Addressing Social Disparities of Health in the Community
    Houston Department of Health and Human Services

    Brenda M. Reyes, M.D., M.H.S., C.G.M.S.
    Brenda M. Reyes, M.D., M.H.S., C.G.M.S.
     

    What you will learn:

    How lessons from the local level could help determine core principles and other decisions to help protect vulnerable children and their families.


    Discussion Moderator
    University of California, Berkeley, and University of California, San Francisco 

    John Balmes, M.D.
    John Balmes, M.D.
     

     

    June 11, 2014 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2014 Webinar Series
    This month's webinar: Is Our Food Safe from Chemical Exposures?

    Children are exposed to contaminants in food that may affect their health and development. This session will focus on some specific contaminants that are of increasing concern to scientists, policy makers and communities. The goals of this session include: Provide an overview of what is known about the presence of arsenic and pesticides in food, current regulatory initiatives and risk communication challenges; Present the state of the science of children’s health and food exposure to pesticides, BPA and arsenic; Stimulate audience questions and discussion with the presenters.


    Pesticides and Children: State-of-the-Science of Exposure Assessment and Health Effects
    University of California, Berkeley

    Brenda Eskenazi
    Brenda Eskenazi
     

    What you will learn:

    This presentation will focus on trends in pesticide use in agriculture and the levels of exposures to various pesticides in pregnant women and children. We will briefly review some of the recent evidence on health effects in children of these pesticides.


    BPA and Children's Health: Updates on Food Packaging Exposure and Health Effects
    University of California, Berkeley

    Lesliam Quirós-Alcalá
    Lesliam Quirós-Alcalá
     

    What you will learn:

    BPA has been found in plastics and food can liners. This presentation will discuss human exposure to BPA and the potential health effects that have been described in children.


    Arsenic in Food and Water: Exposure Assessment and Children’s Health Effects Research
    Dartmouth College

    Kathryn Cottingham
    Kathryn Cottingham
     

    What you will learn:

    Relatively little is known about the possible effects of low-level arsenic exposure, especially during childhood, via food and water. This presentation will summarize exposure estimates for the New Hampshire Birth Cohort and describe plans to assess potential health effects in this population.


    Improving Food Safety Through Strategic Science, Communication, and Advocacy
    Food Safety and Sustainability Center, Consumer Reports

    Michael Crupain
    Michael Crupain
    Urvashi Rangan
    Urvashi Rangan
     

    What you will learn:

    Consuming foods contaminated with heavy metals, pesticides, and other chemicals like BPA can increase health risks. This presentation will focus on how scientists can engage policy makers and the public in order to help reduce exposure.

    May 14, 2014 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2014 Webinar Series

    Join us for the monthly webinar series presenting the latest research findings in children’s environmental health from the EPA/NIEHS Children’s Centers. The mission of the Children’s Centers program is to reduce children’s health risks, protect them from environmental threats and to promote children’s health and well-being in the communities where they learn, live and play. The webinar features presentations and interactive discussions including recent findings and new developments in children’s environmental health.


    Passive Air-Sampling Methods with Community-Based Participatory Research in Yakima Valley, Washington
    University of Washington

    Richard Fenske
    Richard Fenske
     

    What you will learn:

    Passive air sampling methods were developed to measure organophosphorus insecticides and their transformation byproducts such as the more toxic oxygen analogs (oxons) in agricultural communities. Higher proportions of oxons were identified in air, particularly in samples further from potential sources of application and during times of increased cumulative solar radiation.


    Near-Roadway Air Pollution, Obesity and Metabolic Consequences
    University of Southern California

    Robert McConnell
    Robert McConnell
     

    What you will learn:

    Emerging evidence indicates that outdoor air pollution plays a role in obesity and its metabolic consequences, the major focus of the new Southern California Children’s Center. Preliminary results from the Center will be presented showing associations of near-roadway pollution and trajectories of growth of body mass index.


    Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Children's Health in California's San Joaquin Valley
    University of California, Berkeley

    Katharine Hammond
    Katharine Hammond
    Elizabeth Noth
    Elizabeth Noth

    April 9, 2014 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2014 Webinar Series

    Join us for the monthly webinar series presenting the latest research findings in children’s environmental health from the EPA/NIEHS Children’s Centers. The mission of the Children’s Centers program is to reduce children’s health risks, protect them from environmental threats and to promote children’s health and well-being in the communities where they learn, live and play. The webinar features presentations and interactive discussions including recent findings and new developments in children’s environmental health.


    Epigenetics, Air pollution, and T cell immunity in Children
    Stanford University

    Kari Nadeau
    Kari Nadeau

    What will you learn:

    Dr. Nadeau's research investigates the role of ambient air exposure on the developing immune system in children, with a focus on understanding the interactions between the environment and the immune system through detailed mechanistic studies in T cells. Dr. Nadeau works with Dr. Rachel Miller at Columbia University on two grants focusing on epigenetics in the immune cells of children exposed to pollution.


    Environmental Influences on the Epigenome
    Columbia University

    Rachel Miller
    Rachel Miller

    What will you learn:

    Dr. Miller reviews prenatal environmental exposures and their association with allergy and asthma. She also discusses the growing evidence that suggests that epigenetic regulation following environmental exposures may underlie the interface between prenatal and early-life environmental exposure and asthma susceptibility


    Variation in Cord Blood DNA Methylation with Low-Level Arsenic Exposure
    Dartmouth College

    Carmen J. Marsit
    Carmen J. Marsit

    What will you learn:

    We have investigated the relationship between arsenic exposure levels that can be experienced in a US population in utero and variation in DNA methylation in newborn infant cord blood. We have identified changes in specific cellular subsets associated with this exposure as well as have identified potentially functional alterations to DNA methylation in those exposed infants.


    Asthma: an epidemic caused by epigenetics?
    University of Colorado

    Ivana Yang
    Ivana Yang

    What will you learn:

    Dr. Yang’s presentation summarizes the findings of the group, on the role of DNA methylation in human cohorts and animal models of allergic airway disease.


    Moderator
    University of California, Berkeley/University of California, San Francisco

    Joseph L. Wiemels
    Joseph L. Wiemels
     

    March 12, 2014 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2014 Webinar Series

    Join us for the monthly webinar series presenting the latest research findings in children’s environmental health from the EPA/NIEHS Children’s Centers. The mission of the Children’s Centers program is to reduce children’s health risks, protect them from environmental threats and to promote children’s health and well-being in the communities where they learn, live and play.


    The Importance of Preventing Harmful Environmental Exposures Before Birth
    University of Illinois

    Susan L. Schantz
    Susan L. Schantz
     

    Prenatal exposure to air pollution and health and neurodevelopment in a New York City cohort
    Columbia University

    Frederica Perera
    Frederica Perera
     

    Prevention For All
    University of California, San Francisco

    Tracey J. Woodruff
    Tracey J. Woodruff
     

    Preventing Harmful Exposures before and during Pregnancy: CHPAC’s Suggestions for Getting the Message Out
    California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal/EPA)

    Martha Sandy
    Martha Sandy
     

    Prevention in the Exam Room
    University of Illinois

    Susan Buchanan
    Susan Buchanan
     

    February 12, 2014 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2014 Webinar Series

    Join us for the monthly webinar series presenting the latest research findings in children’s environmental health from the EPA/NIEHS Children’s Centers.

    This month’s topic:
    Risks to Children’s Health: Chemicals in Consumer Products
    There is increasing concern about children’s exposure to chemicals found in common consumer products such as furniture and electronics (flame retardants); cosmetics and personal care products (phthalates, triclosan and other phenols); food storage containers (BPA); and children’s toys (phthalates and metals). This webinar focuses on recent studies that are advancing our knowledge of the health effects of these chemicals, examining trends and changes in exposure over time and methods for communicating with patients about risks and lowering exposure. Presentations will be followed by moderated discussion.


    Health Effects of Chemicals in Consumer Products: Flame Retardants
    Center for Environmental Research and Children’s Health (CERCH)

    Kim Harley
    Kim Harley

    What will you learn:

    This presentation will provide an overview of what is known about the health effects of chemicals found in consumer products and an update on the new chemicals of concern as the old ones are phased out.

    Chemicals in Consumer Products: Trends in Exposure and New Chemicals of Interest
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Antonia Calafat, Ph.D.
    Antonia Calafat

    What will you learn:

    Synthetic chemicals, such as phthalates or bisphenol A (plasticizers), parabens (preservatives), triclosan (antimicrobial agent) and benzophenone-3 (sunscreen agent) can be used in personal care products, medications, paints, adhesives and in some medical products. Because some of these chemicals have demonstrated toxicity in experimental animals, alternative chemicals are entering the consumer market. This presentation will include information on how biomonitoring can be used to assess human exposure to these chemicals and to evaluate exposure trends.


    How the Antibacterial Triclosan Impairs Muscle Function: Is it Relevant to Human and Environmental Health?
    Center for Children’s Environmental Health (CCEH) - UC Davis

    Isaac Pessah
    Isaac Pessah

    What will you learn:

    Triclosan (TCS) is widely used as an antibacterial chemical in many personal care products, including shampoos, soap, deodorant and toothpaste – and it is also a pollutant of growing concern to human and environmental health in the U.S. and worldwide. TCS impairs excitation-contraction coupling (ECC) in both cardiac and skeletal muscles and acutely depresses blood flow and grip strength in mice. In embryonic muscle cells, TCS initially stimulates electrically evoked calcium transients followed by complete failure of ECC by altering the function of two fundamentally important ion channels: L-type Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors. The mechanism by which TCS (and possibly related chemicals) weakens cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction may negatively impact muscle health, especially in susceptible populations.


    Chemicals in Consumer Products: An Overview of Clinical Questions to the Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit (PEHSU)
    Mount Sinai Center for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research

    Maida Galvez
    Maida Galvez

    What will you learn:

    Families today are deluged with headlines about environmental threats to children’s health present in consumer products, including children’s toys, furnishings and personal care products. They often turn to their physicians for answers. However, health care providers often lag behind their patients with respect to knowledge about environmental chemicals. This presentation focuses on examples and experience from the PEHSU National Network in translating emerging science on chemicals in consumer products to action.


    (Discussion Moderator)
    George Washington University

    Jerome Paulson
    Jerome Paulson

    January 8, 2014 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2014 Webinar Series

    Join us for the monthly webinar series presenting the latest research findings in children’s environmental health from the EPA/NIEHS Children’s Centers. The mission of the Children’s Centers program is to reduce children’s health risks, protect them from environmental threats and to promote children’s health and well-being in the communities where they learn, live and play

    Using Newborn Dried Blood Spots to Estimate In Utero Exposures to Chemicals
    Center for Integrative Research on Childhood Leukemia and the Environment (CIRCLE)

    Stephen M. Rappaport
    Stephen M. Rappaport

    What will you learn:

    1. What is the exposome and how can we use newborn dried blood spots (DBS) to investigate exposures received by babies during pregnancy?
    2. What are protein adducts and how can they be used to get information about exposures to a group of toxins called "reactive electrophiles"?
    3. Is it possible to measure protein adducts in a small portion of a DBS representing 1/10th of a drop of blood (because this is all we have to work with)?

    Paternal and Maternal Tobacco Smoking and the Risk of Leukemia in the Offspring
    Center for Integrative Research on Childhood Leukemia and the Environment (CIRCLE)

    Catherine Metayer
    Catherine Metayer

    What will you learn:

    1. Leukemia is a heterogeneous disease and the risk factors are likely to be subtype-specific.
    2. Carcinogens in tobacco smoke can damage the parents' germ-cells (before conception) and child's somatic cells (during pregnancy and after birth).
    3. Epidemiologic data support the "two" hit model of leukemogenesis for childhood leukemia.

2013 Events Archive

  • December 11, 2013 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2013 Webinar Series

    Join us for the monthly webinar series presenting the latest research findings in children’s environmental health from the EPA/NIEHS Children’s Centers. The mission of the Children’s Centers program is to reduce children’s health risks, protect them from environmental threats and to promote children’s health and well-being in the communities where they learn, live and play

    Do Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Affect the Tempo of Maturation and Development of Obesity in Adolescence?
    Perinatal Exposures, Epigenetics, Child Obesity and Sexual Maturation - University of Michigan

    Karen Peterson
    Karen Peterson

    What will you learn:

    1. What are endocrine disrupting chemicals and have they been associated with changes in the tempo of sexual maturation?
    2. Are endocrine disrupting chemical exposures in early life and adolescence related to body mass index and fat distribution in adolescence?
    3. Are effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals on the tempo of maturation and measures of fat distribution different for boys and girls?
    John Meeker
    John Meeker

    Environment and Obesity
    Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health - Columbia University

    Andrew Rundle
    Andrew Rundle

    What will you learn:

    1. The hypothesis that chemical exposures during pregnancy may influence the child's growth and risk of obesity
    2. Exposure to air pollutants during pregnancy is associated with higher body mass index in the child at age 5 and 7
    3. Exposure to Di-(2-ethylhexyl)-Phthalate during pregnancy seems to alter the child's growth trajectory, such that the child has a lower BMI at age 5, but larger BMI gain from age 5 to age 7.
  • November 13, 2013 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2013 Webinar Series

    Join us for the monthly webinar series presenting the latest research findings in children’s environmental health from the EPA/NIEHS Children’s Centers. The mission of the Children’s Centers program is to reduce children’s health risks, protect them from environmental threats and to promote children’s health and well-being in the communities where they learn, live and play

    Exposure to Pesticides and Children's Health
    Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research - University of Washington

    Elaine Faustman
    Elaine Faustman

    What will you learn:

    1. The complexity of assessing genetic, environmental and lifestage susceptibility factors that affect pesticide exposure and response.
    2. Whether knowing the genotype/phenotype for key genes that metabolize organophosphate pesticides allows for improved prediction of exposure response.
    3. Can metabolomic approaches be used to assess cumulative exposures?
    4. What can we learn about multiple exposures using targeted and nontargeted approaches?

    Updates on PON1 Polymorphisms: The Role of Sensitivity Factors and New Adduct Work
    Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research - University of Washington

    Clement E. Furlong
    Clement E. Furlong

    What will you learn:

    1. Can we use PON1 as a biomarker for susceptibility?
    2. How can we integrate PON1 status with environmental exposures and lifestage considerations for a GXEXT Approach?
    3. What are new biomarkers for pesticide exposure?
    Judit Marsillach
    Judit Marsillach

    Nonchemical Stressors: Psychosocial Stress Assessment in the University of Washington Children's Center
    Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research - University of Washington

    Marissa Smith
    Marissa Smith

    What will you learn:

    1. Methods of stress assessment used in the CHC: Questionnaire and biomarker comparisons.
    2. Innovative tools developed to integrate acute and chronic stress biomarkers.
    3. Preliminary results and challenges from measuring cortisol in blood, saliva and hair.
  • October 29-30, 2013 - EPA/NIEHS Children’s Centers Annual Progress Review Conference (SHC)

    Over 200 people attended the EPA/NIEHS Children’s Centers annual meeting on October 29th and 30th, which celebrated 15 years of the program and Children’s Health month, in a joint meeting with the Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units (PEHSUs). The theme of the meeting was “Protecting Children’s Health for a Lifetime: Environmental Health Research Meets Clinical Practice and Public Policy.” The meeting featured remarks from EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy and NIEHS Director Linda Birnbaum, and presentations from many of the Children’s Centers researchers and PEHSU physicians. A Proceedings document from the meeting will be available at a later date.

  • October 9, 2013 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2013 Webinar Series

    Canceled

    Using Newborn Dried Blood Spots to Estimate in utero Exposures to Chemicals
    Center for Integrative Research on Childhood Leukemia and the Environment (CIRCLE) - UC Berkeley

    Stephen M. Rappaport
    Stephen M. Rappaport

    What will you learn:

    1. What is the exposome and how can we use newborn dried blood spots (DBS) to investigate exposures received by infants before birth?
    2. What are protein adducts and how can they be used to get information about exposures to a group of toxins called “reactive electrophiles”?
    3. Is it possible to measure protein adducts in a small portion of a DBS from childhood leukemia cases and controls, representing 1/10th of a drop of blood (because this is all we have to work with)?

    Human Fetal Lung Xenograft as Model of Antenatal Arsenic Exposure
    Formative Center for the Evaluation of Environmental Impacts on Fetal Development - Brown University

    Monique DePaepe
    Monique DePaepe

    What will you learn:

    1. Strengths of pulmonary xenograft as model of fetal lung growth
    2. Limitation of pulmonary xenograft as model of fetal lung growth
    3. Preliminary insights into effect of environmentally relevant arsenic exposure on human fetal lung remodeling

  • September 11, 2013 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2013 Webinar Series

    Join us for the monthly webinar series presenting the latest research findings in children’s environmental health from the EPA/NIEHS Children’s Centers. The mission of the Children’s Centers program is to reduce children’s health risks, protect them from environmental threats and to promote children’s health and well-being in the communities where they learn, live and play

    Everyday Exposures to Bacterial Endotoxins and Asthma in Children
    Denver Children’s Environmental Health Center - Environmental Determinants of Airway Disease in Children - National Jewish Health

    Andrew Liu
    Andrew Liu

    What will you learn:

    1. What are bacterial endotoxin exposures?
    2. What are some early intervention and prevention strategies for managing asthma severity?

    Urban Air Pollution and Childhood Asthma: Burden of Disease
    University of Southern California

    Rob McConnell
    Rob McConnell

    What will you learn:

    1. Why is it useful to distinguish near-roadway air pollution from regional pollution?
    2. What is the evidence that air pollution causes asthma?
    3. What is the burden of disease associated with regional and near-roadway air pollution?

  • August 14 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2013 Webinar Series

    Join us for the monthly webinar series presenting the latest research findings in children’s environmental health from the EPA/NIEHS Children’s Centers. The mission of the Children’s Centers program is to reduce children’s health risks, protect them from environmental threats and to promote children’s health and well-being in the communities where they learn, live and play

    Maternal Autoantibodies in Autism Spectrum Disorder
    Center for Children’s Environmental Health (CCEH) - UC Davis

    Judy Van de Water
    Judy
    Van de Water

    What will you learn:

    1. What are maternal autoantibodies?
    2. How do maternal autoantibodies relate to autism?
    3. What is the evidence that suggests that these antibodies are pathologic?

    Nutrition and Autism Spectrum Disorders: Importance and Potential Mechanisms
    Center for Children’s Environmental Health (CCEH) - UC Davis

    Rebecca Schmidt
    Rebecca Schmidt

    What will you learn:

    1. Describe evidence for a role of nutrition in autism spectrum disorders
    2. Describe research findings to date on nutrition and autism, including interactions between genes and toxicant environmental exposures
    3. Understand potential mechanisms involved in the link between nutrition and autism

  • July 10 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2013 Webinar Series

    Join us for the monthly webinar series presenting the latest research findings in children’s environmental health from the EPA/NIEHS Children’s Centers. The mission of the Children’s Centers program is to reduce children’s health risks, protect them from environmental threats and to promote children’s health and well-being in the communities where they learn, live and play

    A Rat Model of Bisphenol A (BPA) Exposure During Early Development on Cognitive Behavior and Cortical Neuroanatomy During Adulthood
    Novel Methods to Assess Effects of Bisphenol A & Phthalates on Child Development - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Janice Juraska
    Janice Juraska

    What will you learn:

    1. Are there lasting effects of early BPA exposure on performance on a complex cognitive task (radial arm maze) in adults?
    2. Does early exposure to BPA affect the structure of the adult cortex?
    3. Are there sex differences in the effects of early BPA exposure?

    Placental Epigenetic Biomarkers of Exposure and Health
    Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Center - Dartmouth College

    Carmen Marsit
    Carmen Marsit

    What will you learn:

    1. Why is the placenta an ideal functional organ to examine in children’s health research?
    2. Why are epigenetic biomarkers useful in linking exposure and children’s health?
    3. How could epigenetic alterations in the placenta lead to neurodevelopment outcomes in children?

  • June 12 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2013 Webinar Series

    Join us for the monthly webinar series presenting the latest research findings in children’s environmental health from the EPA/NIEHS Children’s Centers. The mission of the Children’s Centers program is to reduce children’s health risks, protect them from environmental threats and to promote children’s health and well-being in the communities where they learn, live and play

    Maternal and Fetal Exposures to BPA During Mid-Gestation
    Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center: Formative Center - University of California, San Francisco

    Tracey Woodruff
    Tracey Woodruff

    What will you learn:

    1. What is the BPA exposure among pregnant women in a low income populations?
    2. What are the sources and predictors of exposure to BPA?
    3. What are fetal exposures to BPA and its metabolites?

    Bisphenol A and Children’s Health: Results from the CHAMACOS Study
    Center for Environmental Research and Children’s Health (CERCH) - UC Berkeley

    Kim Harley
    Kim Harley

    What will you learn:

    1. The sources and levels of BPA exposure to pregnant mothers and children
    2. The impact of early life BPA exposure on thyroid hormone, neurodevelopment and behavior, and obesity

  • May 8 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2013 Webinar Series

    Join us for the monthly webinar series presenting the latest research findings in children’s environmental health from the EPA/NIEHS Children’s Centers. The mission of the Children’s Centers program is to reduce children’s health risks, protect them from environmental threats and to promote children’s health and well-being in the communities where they learn, live and play

    Mechanistic Studies on the Link Between Epigenetic Modifications in Candidate Genes and Allergy/Asthma
    Berkeley/Stanford Children's Environment Health Center - UC Berkeley

    Kari Nadeau
    Kari Nadeau

    What will you learn:

    1. Learn methods for studying epigenetic changes in candidate genes in purified call subsets
    2. Identify key cell types in T cells linked to asthma phenotypes
    3. Determine the associations of air pollution exposure and epigenetic changes

    The Epigenome and Asthma: Interactions Between Imprinted Genes and Environmental Exposures
    Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health - Columbia University

    Rachel Miller
    Rachel Miller

    What will you learn:

    1. Do prenatal environmental exposures influence the phenotype in offspring, and is there a ‘parent-of-origin’ effect?
    2. Can asthma be imprinted, and if so, is epigenetic regulation the mechanism for imprinting?
    3. Does epigenetic regulation of asthma genes explain the link between prenatal environmental exposures and asthma in children?

    Rethinking the Role of Indoor Allergens in Inner-City Asthma
    Mechanisms of Asthma-Dietary Interventions against Environmental Triggers - Johns Hopkins University

    Elizabeth Matsui
    Elizabeth Matsui

    What will you learn:

    1. To understand that the allergens of public health relevance vary across communities.
    2. To understand the complexity of allergen exposure and how it informs environmental interventions for asthma.
    3. To understand the costs and potential benefits of environmental control measures in inner-city asthma.

  • April 10 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2013 Webinar Series

    Join us for the monthly webinar series presenting the latest research findings in children’s environmental health from the EPA/NIEHS Children’s Centers. The mission of the Children’s Centers program is to reduce children’s health risks, protect them from environmental threats and to promote children’s health and well-being in the communities where they learn, live and play

    Early Exposure to Bisphenol A and Lead: Effects on Metabolic Homeostasis and the Epigenome
    Perinatal Exposures, Epigenetics, Child Obesity and Sexual Maturation - University of Michigan

    Dana Dolinoy
    Dana Dolinoy

    What will you learn:

    Animal models can influence children’s environmental health research by:

    1. Dose-dependent effect detection – across multiple tissue and consistent doses
    2. Exposure timing and duration can be limited in early life to distinguish persistent epigenetic effects
    3. Animals may be followed throughout the life course for outcomes of interest
    4. Bioavailable tissues can be referenced against target tissues to inform epigenetic epidemiology

    DNA Methylation Changes in Blood Cells that Impact Leukemia – Role of Environment
    Center for Integrative Research on Childhood Leukemia and the Environment (CIRCLE) - UC Berkeley

    Joe Wiemels
    Joe Wiemels

    What will you learn:

    1. How does DNA methylation change in normal blood cell development?
    2. What DNA methylation aberrations occur between a normal cell and leukemia cell?
    3. Can early environmental exposures impact the DNA methylation aberrations that cause leukemia?

  • March 13 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2013 Webinar Series

    Join us for the monthly webinar series presenting the latest research findings in children’s environmental health from the EPA/NIEHS Children’s Centers. The mission of the Children’s Centers program is to reduce children’s health risks, protect them from environmental threats and to promote children’s health and well-being in the communities where they learn, live and play

    Marie Lynn Miranda Marie Lynn Miranda Of Mice and Moms: Environment, Social Stressors and Disparities in Birth Outcomes

    What will you learn:

    1. How air pollution exposures may affect pregnancy outcomes
    2. How social context interacts with environmental exposures to shape health outcomes
    3. How different methods can be integrated to deepen our understanding of air pollution impacts on pregnancy outcomes
    Southern Center on Environmentally-Driven Disparities in Birth Outcomes (SCEDDBO) - University of Michigan and Duke University
    Amy Padula Amy Padula Traffic-related Air Pollution, Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status and Risk of Preterm Birth in the San Joaquin Valley of California

    What will you learn:

    1. the association between traffic-related air pollution and preterm birth is driven by early preterm births;
    2. the association between air pollution and preterm birth is strong among those in low socioeconomic status neighborhoods;
    3. those who are exposed to multiple pollutants at high levels, the associations are compounded.
    Berkeley/Stanford Children's Environment Health Center - UC Berkeley

  • February 13 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2013 Webinar Series

    For many reasons, children are likely to be more vulnerable than adults to the effects of environmental contaminants. To better understand the effects of these exposures on children's health, the Centers for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research ("Children's Centers") were established in 1998 to explore ways to reduce children's health risks from environmental factors. The program is jointly funded by EPA through the Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants program, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) with additional expertise and low-cost laboratory services provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    Amy Kyle Amy Kyle Aligning the Planets: Working with Networks to Achieve Structural Change

    What will you learn:

    1. At the end of the session, participants will be able to identify the range of partners and audiences for children's environmental health research.
    2. At the end of the session, participants will understand the role that networks can play in advancing children's environmental health.
    Center for Integrative Research on Childhood Leukemia and the Environment (CIRCLE) - UC Berkeley
    Alyssa Creighton Alyssa Creighton Engaging Community Partners for Effective Development of Outreach Strategies

    What you will learn:

    1. How can engaging a Community Advisory & Stakeholder Board in the development process result in successful outreach initiatives?
    2. What are the benefits of focus groups in providing feedback on new educational materials?
    3. How can a collaborative community process improve the creation of an educational campaign?
    Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health
    Daniel Madrigal Daniel Madrigal Engaging Children and Adolescents in Environmental Health Research

    What will you learn:

    1. What are the methods we use to educate children and adolescents about the environmental health issues that we study at CHAMACOS?
    2. Which activities and events promote environmental health discussions between age groups?
    3. How does our youth engagement fit with the overall community outreach strategy of the CHAMACOS Study?
    Center for Environmental Research and Children’s Health (CERCH) - UC Berkeley
    Patrice Sutton Patrice Sutton The Role of Health Professionals in Prevention

    What will you learn:

    1. Why health professionals and their organizations are an important constituency for advancing environmental health
    2. Challenges and opportunities in engaging health professionals
    3. Building capacity: Existing guidelines, tools and publications
    Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center: Formative Center - University of California, San Francisco
    Phil Brown Phil Brown Hospitals for a Healthy Environment

    What will you learn:

    1. How work to remove phthalates and PVC from the NICU at our partner hospital generated a statewide campaign.
    2. How the Children’s Environmental Health Centers can get involved at a national level
    3. How environmentally sustainable hospitals work can build children’s environmental health networks
    Formative Center for the Evaluation of Environmental Impacts on Fetal Development - Brown University

  • January 16 - 17, 2013 - Symposium on Cumulative Impacts and Children's Environmental Health -- Featuring West Coast EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers and PEHSUs
    • To provide updates on scientific findings and knowledge related to children’s environmental health to scientists working for the State of California and other entities that assess risk, analyze public health problems, and develop solutions.
    • To identify actions that can be taken now to better address cumulative impacts on children’s environmental health as well as steps that are needed over the long term;
    • To provide an opportunity for discussion and reflection among different sectors involved in the children’s environmental health community, including those from academic, medical, government, and non-governmental organizations;
    • To bring into focus the aspects of cumulative impacts that are most important for children’s environmental health;
    • To further interaction and collaboration among the western children’s environmental health research centers and pediatric environmental health specialty units;
    • To provide a forum for feedback from users of children’s environmental health research to those who conduct such research;
    • To contribute to the development of a more comprehensive framework and vocabulary for children’s environmental health

2012 Events Archive

  • December 12, 2012 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2012 Webinar Series
    For many reasons, children are likely to be more vulnerable than adults to the effects of environmental contaminants. To better understand the effects of these exposures on children's health, the Centers for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research ("Children's Centers") were established in 1998 to explore ways to reduce children's health risks from environmental factors. The program is jointly funded by EPA through the Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants program, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) with additional expertise and low-cost laboratory services provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
    Gregory Diette
    Johns Hopkins University
    Gregory Diette Johns Hopkins Center for Childhood Asthma in the Urban Environment: Role of Home Indoor Environment and Diet on Childhood Asthma

    What will you learn:

    1. Learn to identify indoor pollutants that worsen childhood asthma
    2. Learn the effect of pests on asthma morbidity
    3. Understand how changes in dietary pattern may have increased the risk for asthma
    Johns Hopkins Children's Center
    Shyam Biswal
    Johns Hopkins University
    Shyam Biswal Nrf2 directed environmental stress response against oxidative stress and inflammation

    What you will learn:

    1. What is the environmental stress response regulated by Nrf2
    2. How does Nrf2 protects from oxidative stress and inflammation
    3. How does Nrf2 act as a modifier of asthma
    Johns Hopkins Children's Center
    Nadia Hansel
    Johns Hopkins University
    Nadia Hansel Home Interventions to Improve Indoor Air Quality and Asthma Health

    What you will learn:

    1. How effective are air cleaners at reducing indoor particulate matter (PM) concentrations?
    2. Can we reduce indoor nitrogen dioxide concentrations?
    3. Can reducing indoor air pollutant concentrations improve asthma health?
    Johns Hopkins Children's Center
  • November 14, 2012 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2012 Webinar Series
    For many reasons, children are likely to be more vulnerable than adults to the effects of environmental contaminants. To better understand the effects of these exposures on children's health, the Centers for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research ("Children's Centers") were established in 1998 to explore ways to reduce children's health risks from environmental factors. The program is jointly funded by EPA through the Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants program, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) with additional expertise and low-cost laboratory services provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
    Margaret Karagas
    Dartmouth
    Margaret Karagas In Utero and Early Life Exposure to Arsenic - Sources and Potential Health Impacts Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Center - Dartmouth College
     
    Karen Peterson
    University of Michigan




    Dana C. Dolinoy
    University of Michigan School of Public Health

    Karen Peterson

    Dana C. Dolinoy
    Toxicant Exposures and the Development of Obesity in Childhood Perinatal Exposures, Epigenetics, Child Obesity and Sexual Maturation - University of Michigan
  • October 10, 2012 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2012 Webinar Series
    For many reasons, children are likely to be more vulnerable than adults to the effects of environmental contaminants. To better understand the effects of these exposures on children's health, the Centers for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research ("Children's Centers") were established in 1998 to explore ways to reduce children's health risks from environmental factors. The program is jointly funded by EPA through the Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants program, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) with additional expertise and low-cost laboratory services provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
    Patricia Buffler
    University of California Berkeley,
    School of Public Health
    Patricia Buffler Improving Knowledge of the Environmental Causes of Leukemia in Children: the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on Childhood Leukemia and the Environment (CIRCLE) Center for Integrative Research on Childhood Leukemia and the Environment (CIRCLE) - UC Berkeley
     
    Catherine Metayer
    University of California Berkeley,
    School of Public Health
    Catherine Metayer Global Perspectives on Childhood Leukemia Research - the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) Center for Integrative Research on Childhood Leukemia and the Environment (CIRCLE) - UC Berkeley
     
    Joseph Wiemels
    University of California - San Francisco
    Joseph Wiemels DNA methylation in blood cell development and leukemia : building a framework to study environmental effects on methylation Center for Integrative Research on Childhood Leukemia and the Environment (CIRCLE) - UC Berkeley
     
    Todd Whitehead
    Todd Whitehead Estimating Exposures to Indoor Contaminants using Residential Dust Center for Integrative Research on Childhood Leukemia and the Environment (CIRCLE) - UC Berkeley
  • September 12, 2012 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2012 Webinar Series
    For many reasons, children are likely to be more vulnerable than adults to the effects of environmental contaminants. To better understand the effects of these exposures on children's health, the Centers for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research ("Children's Centers") were established in 1998 to explore ways to reduce children's health risks from environmental factors. The program is jointly funded by EPA through the Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants program, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) with additional expertise and low-cost laboratory services provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
    Susan Schantz
    University of Illinois
    Susan Schantz Novel Approaches to Assessing Cognitive Function in Early Infancy Novel Methods to Assess Effects of Bisphenol A & Phthalates on Child Development
     
    Virginia Rauh
    Columbia University
    Virginia Rauh Effects of Prenatal Exposure to Pesticides on Brain Development and Cognitive Function Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health (CCCEH)
  • August 8, 2012 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2012 Webinar Series
    For many reasons, children are likely to be more vulnerable than adults to the effects of environmental contaminants. To better understand the effects of these exposures on children's health, the Centers for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research ("Children's Centers") were established in 1998 to explore ways to reduce children's health risks from environmental factors. The program is jointly funded by EPA through the Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants program, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) with additional expertise and low-cost laboratory services provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
    Isaac Pessah
    UC Davis
    Isaac Pessah Tipping the Balance of Neural networks with Persistent Organic Pollutants: Relevance to Autism Risk Center for Children’s Environmental Health (CCEH)
     
    Irva Hertz-Picciotto
    UC Davis
    Irva Hertz-Picciotto What Have We Learned about Autism and the Environment: An Epidemiologist's Perspective Center for Children’s Environmental Health (CCEH)
  • July 11, 2012 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2012 Webinar Series
    For many reasons, children are likely to be more vulnerable than adults to the effects of environmental contaminants. To better understand the effects of these exposures on children's health, the Centers for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research ("Children's Centers") were established in 1998 to explore ways to reduce children's health risks from environmental factors. The program is jointly funded by EPA through the Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants program, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) with additional expertise and low-cost laboratory services provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
    Frederica Perera
    Columbia University
    Frederica Perera Effects of Prenatal Environmental Exposures on Child Health and Development Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health
    Richard Auten
    Duke University
    Richard Auten Embracing Complexity: Animal Models of Environmental Exposure Health Effects Southern Center on Environmentally-Driven Disparities in Birth Outcomes (SCEDDBO)
  • June 13, 2012 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2012 Webinar Series
    For many reasons, children are likely to be more vulnerable than adults to the effects of environmental contaminants. To better understand the effects of these exposures on children's health, the Centers for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research ("Children's Centers") were established in 1998 to explore ways to reduce children's health risks from environmental factors. The program is jointly funded by EPA through the Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants program, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) with additional expertise and low-cost laboratory services provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
  • May 21, 2012 - Technical Assistance Webinar for RFA-ES-12-001: Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers
    The purpose of this notice is to inform the extramural research community that a technical assistance webinar will be conducted regarding RFA-ES-12-001, Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers (P01).  The webinar will occur on  May 21, 2012, from 2:00 to 4:00 EST.<
  • April 11, 2012 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EST - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2012 Webinar Series
    For many reasons, children are likely to be more vulnerable than adults to the effects of environmental contaminants. To better understand the effects of these exposures on children's health, the Centers for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research ("Children's Centers") were established in 1998 to explore ways to reduce children's health risks from environmental factors. The program is jointly funded by EPA through the Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants program, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) with additional expertise and low-cost laboratory services provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
  • March 14, 2012 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EST - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2012 Webinar Series
    For many reasons, children are likely to be more vulnerable than adults to the effects of environmental contaminants. To better understand the effects of these exposures on children's health, the Centers for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research ("Children's Centers") were established in 1998 to explore ways to reduce children's health risks from environmental factors. The program is jointly funded by EPA through the Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants program, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) with additional expertise and low-cost laboratory services provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
  • March 8, 2012 - 9:00 a.m.- 3:00 p.m. EST - Early Indicators RFA Grantee Progress Review Meeting
    TThe National Center for Environmental Research (NCER) at the US EPA has funded 5 grants to help answer the question, "Are there practical, reliable methods or indicators to assess the early onset of environmentally related disease?"
  • March 6 - 7, 2012 - NIEHS and EPA Centers for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research: Strengthening the Network
    This meeting will bring together investigators from the EPA/NIEHS Children’s Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers and other experts in the area of children’s environmental health to share scientific strategies, discuss the implementation of new research approaches and tools and to highlight current scientific findings.
  • February 8, 2012 - 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. EST - EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2012 Webinar Series
    For many reasons, children are likely to be more vulnerable than adults to the effects of environmental contaminants. To better understand the effects of these exposures on children's health, the Centers for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research ("Children's Centers") were established in 1998 to explore ways to reduce children's health risks from environmental factors. The program is jointly funded by EPA through the Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants program, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) with additional expertise and low-cost laboratory services provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

2010 Events Archive

  • October 19 - 20, 2010 - Protecting Children's Health for a Lifetime: Environmental Health Research Meets Clinical Practice and Public Policy, Washington, DC
    During Children's Health Month, researchers, clinicians, federal government staff and scientists, representatives of professional organizations and other participants will convene to explore the interplay between research, clinical applications, and policy implications in the field of children's environmental health. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development and Office of Children's Health Protection; The Department of Health and Human Services' Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; and the Association of Occupational and Environmental Clinics are working together to sponsor and celebrate the past, present and future of the Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers (Children's Centers) program, the Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units (PEHSUs) North American network and to discuss recent developments in children's environmental health. The meeting will feature the expertise of the Children's Centers, the PEHSUs, scientists from federal agencies and others through interdisciplinary presentations and discussions that explore connections between research findings, clinical and community practice, and child protective policies. Speakers also will discuss approaches for communicating with the scientific community and for sharing research findings and technical information with parents and the public. We are planning for approximately 200 participants.

2009 Events Archive

  • March 30, 2009 - Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health Conference -- Translating Science to Policy: Protecting Children's Environmental Health, New York, NY
    The Columbia Center for Childrens Environmental Health (CCCEH), in collaboration with its lead community partner, WE ACT for Environmental Justice, is hosting a day-long conference that will focus on three major environmental health concerns affecting children: air pollution, pesticides, and endocrine disruptors in consumer products. The purpose of the conference is to share research findings from the Center and other investigators over the past ten years in these specific areas, discuss interventions stemming from this research that have been implemented in New York City, and identify strategies to advance policies that will reduce and prevent environmentally-related diseases such as asthma, developmental disorders, and cancer in children living in urban communities.

2008 Events Archive

  • October 25-29, 2008American Public Health Association Annual Meeting, San Diego, California.
    The 2008 APHA Annual Meeting has the theme, "Public Health Without Borders," and will explore transnational public health, and provide a forum to address a diversity of topics including immigrant and refugee health; water and land rights; coordinating disease surveillance and epidemiologic response activities across borders; air and water pollution management across borders; the international impact of trade, arms sales, tobacco sales and gun control policies; and the international transmission of socio-cultural behaviors with adverse health implications. This Annual Meeting could similarly provide a forum for a better understanding of the aspects of growing multiculturalism that promote healthy living and even to highlight and foster specific traditional practices that may serve to protect minority populations as they enter new environments. The meeting includes more than 900 scientific sessions, roundtables, poster sessions, institute and panel discussions and the largest public health exposition in the field. More than 4,000 scientific papers are expected to be presented. [More Information]
  • October 12-16, 2008International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE) and International Society of Exposure Analysis (ISEA) 2008 Joint Annual Conference, Pasadena, California.
    The theme of this year's ISEE/ISEA joint conference is "Exposure and Health in a Global Environment." This conference will bring together scientists from around the world to exchange ideas about exposure, health and epidemiology in our global environment. Workshop topics include industrialization and urban growth, global transport of pollution, epidemiological studies of population health disparities, differential impacts of environmental hazards and risks in developing and industrial societies and susceptibilities of different populations to environmentally-linked diseases. [More Information]
  • June 28-July 2, 2008The Teratology Society Annual Meeting, Monterey, California.
    The 48th Annual Meeting of the Teratology Society will be held at the Hyatt Regency Monterey on June 28-July 2, 2008. The 2008 scientific program covers important issues in birth defects research and education, ranging from the latest findings in basic research on embryonic and fetal hypoxia to hot topics in nutrition and food safety as they relate to normal and abnormal fetal and child development. The Annual Meeting provides a place and time to catch up with colleagues, make new friends and participate in discussions with established experts in the field, new researchers, and students. The organization includes individuals from a wide range of disciplines including clinicians, scientists and science policy regulators from academic, industrial, and government sectors.
  • June 23-24 and June 24-27, 2008Society for Pediatric and Perinatal Epidemiologic Research (SPER) and Society for Epidemiologic Research (SER) Annual Meetings, Chicago, Illinois.
    SPER is an organization of individuals from a wide variety of disciplines who share an interest in the epidemiology of pregnancy, infancy and childhood.  The objective of the Society is to foster pediatric and perinatal epidemiologic research. This research includes the study of any factors that influence maternal health and the health and development of children, from conception through adolescence.  The work presented at SPER's annual meeting represents the cutting edge of research in pediatric and perinatal epidemiology. The Society was formed in 1988 and holds an annual meeting each June, immediately preceding the meeting of the Society of Epidemiological Research (SER), which was also established in 1968 as a forum for sharing the latest in epidemiologic research. The SER is committed to keeping epidemiologists at the vanguard of scientific developments.

2007 Events Archive

  • October 14-18, 2007International Society for Exposure AnalysisExit EPA Disclaimer, Durham, North Carolina.
    This year's theme is Exploring Innovative Approaches in Exposure Assessment. This conference will bring together scientists from many environmental and public health fields to present and exchange information on recent advances in the broad field of Exposure Science. [More Information]
  • October 10-13, 2007 – This workshop brings together the Children's Centers and the Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units of North America to explore the latest research findings and their practical application in community settings. This workshop is sponsored by the EPA, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the Association of Occupational and Environmental Clinics in recognition of ten years of federal effort to protect childrens environmental health as called for in Executive Order 13045, Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks. This anniversary provides the childrens environmental health community with an opportunity to reflect on the progress that has been made and to formulate our vision for the future of childrens environmental health. [More Information]
  • September 5-9, 2007Nineteenth Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE)Exit EPA Disclaimer, Mexico City, Mexico.
    This year’s theme is “Translating Environmental Epidemiology into Action: Interventions for a Healthy Future.” [More Information]
  • June 10-12, 20074th International Conference on Children’s Health and the EnvironmentExit EPA Disclaimer, Vienna, Austria.
    This conference's purpose is to be a world-wide platform dealing with health problems of children caused by important environmental influences. [More Information]
  • May 20-24, 2007International Conference on Developmental Toxicity and Fetal ProgrammingExit EPA Disclaimer, Torshawn, Faroe Islands.
    The conference will focus on fetal and early postnatal development as the most vulnerable stages of human life, in regard to adverse effects of environmental hazards. [More Information]
  • May 5-8, 2007Pediatric Academic Societies Annual MeetingExit EPA Disclaimer, Toronto, Canada.
    The PAS Annual Meeting is the largest international meeting focusing on research in child health while providing a unique venue for interdisciplinary scientific interactions.
  • April 30, 2007National Healthy Schools Day Every child in every school community should have an environmentally safe and healthy school that is clean and in good repair. Schools in poor condition on the outside often have indoor environmental problems that affect children’s health and learning.

    Examples of guidelines for existing buildings:

    • Prevent/stop leaks; replace wet and damaged materials in 24-48 hours
    • Wash floors and frequently touched surfaces with green cleaning products
    • Prevent/control pests and weeds naturally
    • Use nontoxic teaching supplies

    Examples of guidelines for new buildings:

    • Site new facilities for walking and biking to school; provide safe outdoor learning/play areas
    • Use natural daylight, natural ventilation, windows that open
    • Design and furnish areas for easy cleaning, maintenance, and storage; avoid carpets
    • Design halls and classrooms to minimize noise and reverberation
    • Don’t use building products that contain persistent or bio-accumulative toxics
    • Protect occupant health during renovations; air out spaces prior to use

    Possible activities:

    • Adopt Guiding Principles of School Environmental Qualityas policy for your school/organization or adopt IAQ management plans.
    • Demonstrate Green Cleaning or IPM practices and products.
    • Demonstrate actions that support school Indoor Air Quality.
    • Hold a Workshop: Designing Healthy High Performance Schools.
    • Hold a conference: children, environment, and health.
    • Celebrate Mayor/City Council, Governor/State Legislature with National Healthy Schools Day proclamations or policy initiatives.

    Possible actions:

    • Write a letter or visit your Principal or Facility Director and ask about cleaning products, pest control products, or school repair needs.
    • Visit a Teacher or School Nurse: learn how children use asthma inhalers at school.
    • Hold a forum with Students or PTA/PTO on healthy school environments.
    • Walk around your school: water stains, cracks in outside walls, broken windows or steps, and overflowing dumpsters are health & safety problems that need attention.

    For more information: 
    http://www.healthyschools.org/CHS-_NHS_Day_slides.pdfExit EPA Disclaimer

  • April 24-27, 2007 – 2007 National Lead Mold Conference, Orlando, Florida. A Networking and Educational Conference Devoted to the Elimination of Childhood Lead Poisoning, the Development and Implementation of Healthy Homes Programs, and the Detection and Remediation of Indoor Environmental Hazards

    The regional conference brings together professionals from health, housing, community development, community groups, facilities, advocacy organizations, real estate firms, businesses and industry to explore ways to undertake programs and projects designed to prevent incidents of lead poisoning and eliminate indoor environmental hazards.

  • April 18-19, 2007 Institute of Medicine's Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders Workshop: Autism and the Environment: Challenges and Opportunities for Research Washington, DC. This workshop is being organized in response to a request from the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services, and will be hosted in collaboration with the IOM’s Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine.

    The workshop will feature presentations and discussions on strategies for research focusing on the potential relationship between autism and an array of environmental exposures focusing on the following three questions:

    1. What are the most promising scientific opportunities for improving the understanding of potential environmental factors in autism?
    2. What scientific tools and technologies are available, what interdisciplinary research approaches are needed, and what further infrastructure investments will be necessary in the short- and long-term to be able to explore potential relationships between autism and environmental factors?
    3. What opportunities exist for public private partnerships in the support and conduct of the research?
    An individually authored summary of the workshop will be published by the National Academies Press.

2006 Events Archive

  • November 4-8, 2006American Public Health Association Annual Meeting, Boston, Massachusetts. The 134th APHA Annual Meeting is designed to provide a platform to share successes and failures, discover exceptional best practices and learn from expert colleagues and the latest research in the field. This year's theme is "public health and human rights." The meeting includes more than 900 scientific sessions, roundtables, poster sessions, institute and panel discussions and the largest public health exposition in the field. More than 4,000 scientific papers will be presented. Exit EPA Disclaimer
  • September 17-21, 200623rd International Neurotoxicology Conference, Little Rock Arkansas. This year's theme is "Neurotoxicity in Development and Aging." The conference included sessions led by UC Davis Children's Center Principal Investigator Issac Pessah on understanding autism's complexities, immune system modulation in autism, and advancing the science of autism spectrum disorders. Presenters also included Drs. Susan Schantz and Richard Seegal of the University of Illinois Children's Center on developmental neuroendocrine effects of PCBs and PBDEs and parallels with ADHD. Exit EPA Disclaimer
  • September 2-6, 2006ISEE/ISEA International Conference on Environmental Epidemiology and Exposure, Paris, France. The 2006 joint conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE) and the International Society of Exposure Analysis (ISEA) will be held in Paris, with the theme "Science, Population diversity, Caution and Precaution." The conference is a unique opportunity for the scientific community concerned with the future of our environment -- and with public health for current and future generations - to question how the adoption of the precautionary principle in the European Union (EU) may change the way scientists work. Under the new regulations, major mass-produced chemicals will need to be registered for each specific use and pass a series of tests in which companies will be forced to share testing data. Chemicals that are deemed safe according to the precautionary principle (a safety assessment based on assuming a compound is hazardous unless proven otherwise) will receive a five-year authorization. While precautionary measures are generally adopted by scientists when interpreting data and scientific evidence, it takes other forms during the regulatory decision process, such as when so-called "uncertainty factors" are used in setting environmental standards. The crucial difference is that the usual - and often private - exchanges between scientists and risk managers are now expected to take place in a transparent and publicly visible manner. In this new setting, each stakeholder is able to question the data, the scientific rationale and the balance of the final decision. Hence, the pressure of public opinion, which weighs heavily on the decision makers, will now also have an impact on the scientific world. Exit EPA Disclaimer
  • May 16-18, 2006EPA 2006 Science Forum, Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, Washington, DC. Each year, the world's leading environmental scientists and policy makers gather at the EPA Science Forum in Washington, DC to explore the latest discoveries in the world of environmental research. The Science Forum demonstrates EPA’s commitment to quality science, highlights high-priority topics and accomplishments, facilitates dialogue among EPA and extramural scientists, clients, customers, stakeholders, and colleagues from across government, the private sector, academia, and the scientific community. The themes for this year's Science Forum include susceptibility, global threats and community futures. Partners include the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS).
  • April 29-May 2, 2006Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) Annual Meeting, San Francisco, California. The goal of the conference is to present a diverse range of pediatric science, ranging from basic science to translational (pre-clinical), clinical and health services research from pediatric academic disciplines, and provide a venue for interdisciplinary scientific interactions. Exit EPA Disclaimer

2005 Events Archive

  • December 10-14, 2005APHA Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The APHA Annual Meeting is designed to share successes and failures, discover exceptional best practices and learn from expert colleagues and the latest research in the field. The meeting includes more than 900 scientific sessions, roundtables, poster sessions, institute and panel discussions and the largest public health exposition in the field. More than 4,000 scientific papers will be presented. Exit EPA Disclaimer
  • October 30-November 3, 2005The 15th Annual Conference of the International Society of Exposure Analysis, Tucson, Arizona. Practitioners of Exposure Analysis use diverse approaches when improving exposure assessment, via new methods of recruitment, sample collection or laboratory analysis across a diversity of species, age, gender, income, race and ethnicity. Exposure and health disparities remain important concerns. Exit EPA Disclaimer
  • September 28-29 , 2005, The Indoor Environmental Health & Technologies Conference & The Lead and Healthy Homes Grantees Conference Exit EPA Disclaimer -- Presented by the National Association of Lead and Healthy Homes Grantees. Presenting programs that focus on ways of Meeting the Challenges of Preventing Environmental Illness through health research, policies, and programs; community education and outreach; building maintenance and operations practices; and lead hazard control and healthy homes policies and programs.
  • September 13-16, 2005The 17th Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE 2005) is being held in Johannesburg, South Africa. The annual ISEE meeting brings together more than 500 international delegates from diverse spheres of interest including epidemiologists, toxicologists, governmental and industrial representatives, community activists, students and policy makers to discuss issues pertaining to environment and health. Exit EPA Disclaimer
  • September 11-14, 200522nd International Neurotoxicology Conference, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. This year’s theme is “Environment and Neurodevelopmental Disorders.” The conference includes an all-day session led by Children’s Centers researchers, presenting an integrated overview of the multidisciplinary approaches needed to understand risk factors contributing to childhood disorders and aging. This session will provide mechanistic data that will aid in the interpretation of epidemiological data and in understanding the role that environmental agents play in inducing central nervous system dysfunctions. Exit EPA Disclaimer
  • July 26-29, 2005, Children's World Summit for the Environment Exit EPA Disclaimer
  • July 11-12, 2005, Collaborations for Children's Environmental Health Research: A Scientist-to-Scientist Workshop, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. A working meeting to build scientist-to-scientist collaboration in children’s environmental health research. This meeting was held to ensure that EPA’s research will continue to lead local and national efforts in children’s health, from basic research to major public health outcomes. The conference included brief updates from the Children’s Centers on their research, and breakout sessions to discuss collaborations between Children’s Centers researchers and EPA scientists in areas including computational toxicology, neurotoxicology, asthma and air pollution, organophosphate and organochlorine pesticide exposures and oxidative stress biomarkers.
  • April 17-19, 2005, Health Effects Institute Annual Conference Exit EPA Disclaimer -- Theme: The Latest in Air Quality Measures and Health Research. Topics include: Health Effects of Traffic Pollution; Air Pollution and Children's Health; and Particulate Matter in a Multi-Pollutant World.

Centers Funded By:
Centers Funded by Epa and NIEHS

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