Jump to main content or area navigation.

Contact Us

Extramural Research

Newsroom

Read recent newsletters, articles, and press releases. The selection of readings is updated periodically.

News Stories | Grant Applications Sought | Events
News Stories

Pregnant WomanNew Study Shows Changes in Genes during Pregnancy May Cause Long-Term Health Effects in Children
A new study shows that a change in groups of genes turned "on" and "off” may last from before birth at least into early childhood. Children of mothers with a high body mass index (BMI) may show more of these changes, and could cause lasting health effects in children.
[Read More]

EPA/NIEHS Children’s Centers Annual Progress Review Conference (SHC) Event On October 29th and 30th, 2013, the Children’s Centers will be celebrating 15 years of the EPA/NIEHS Children’s Centers program and Children’s Health month in a joint meeting with the Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units (PEHSUs). Our theme is Protecting Children’s Health for a Lifetime: Environmental Health Research Meets Clinical Practice and Public Policy, and our primary goals are to:

  • form connections between research findings, policy implications and clinical practice,
  • explore how to better protect children from harmful environmental exposures, and
  • identify innovative approaches for sharing findings with local communities, parents and the general public.

To register and for more information please go to Calendar Event

UC Davis LogoMother’s Antibodies May Explain a Quarter of Autism Cases
EPA STAR-funded researchers have identified seven primary auto-antibodies and corresponding antigens that appear to be linked to maternal autoantibody-related (MAR) autism.
[Read More]

child with sippy cup STAR Researchers Find BPA exposure may raise risk for Asthma
STAR grantees at the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health have reported that exposures to biphenol A (BPA) by pregnant women and young children may cause an increased risk of asthma in children.
[Read More]

STAR Research Finds Three Risk Factors for Developing Childhood Asthma
STAR Research at Columbia’s Center for Children’s Environmental Health, shows a joint effect between pre term exposure to PAH’s and post term exposure of young children to cockroach allergens.
[Read More]

Baby with Bottle BPA May Lower Essential Hormones in Pregnant Women and Baby Boys
Supported in part by research at the EPA/NIEHS Center for Environmental Research and Children’s Health at the University of California, Berkeley, a new study appears to link the chemical Bisphenol A (BPA), to changes in thyroidal hormonal levels in pregnant women and infant boys.
[Read More]

Mattew Davis Rice Consumption May Expose Children to Arsenic
Supported in part by research at the EPA/NIEHS Dartmouth Children's Center, a new study suggests that rice consumption can expose U.S. children to arsenic.
[Read More]


P3 Logo Phthalates in Plastics Raise Risk of Asthma in Children
STAR researchers at Columbia University's Children’s Environmental Health and Disease Research Center have found that children exposed to phthalates have elevated risk of asthma-related airway inflammation.
[Read More]

Megan Horton, PhD Boys More Vulnerable to Memory Impairment from Insecticide Chlorpyrifos than Girls
STAR researcher Megan Horton at the Children’s Environmental Health and Disease Research Center at Columbia University has published research results showing that after prenatal exposure to the insecticide chrlorpyrifos (CPF), boys at age seven had greater memory impairment than girls with similar exposures, leading to an overall lower IQ. (CFDA: 66.509)
[Read More]

Prenatal Exposure to CPF Possibly Linked to IQ and Memory deficits in Children
The U.S. EPA funded Children’s Environmental Health and Disease Research Center at Columbia University has published a paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) showing that even moderate prenatal exposure to the insecticide chrlorpyrifos (CPF) may cause long-term changes in brain structure of a child.
[Read More]

Prenatal Exposure to Insecticide Chlorpyrifos Linked to Alterations in Brain Structure and Cognition
Even low to moderate levels of exposure to the insecticide chlorpyrifos during pregnancy may lead to long-term, potentially irreversible changes in the brain structure of the child, according to a new brain imaging study by researchers from the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health at the Mailman School of Public Health, Duke University Medical Center, Emory University, and the New York State Psychiatric Institute.
[Read More exit EPA]

Exposure to PCBs in early life may increase autism risk for children
Two new publications from the EPA/NIEHS Children’s Center at UC Davis report that PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) can disrupt early brain development by hijacking the signals that promote normal neuron branching – a crucial step needed for information flow in the brain.
[Read More]

Pregnant Woman Linking Maternal Diabetes and Obesity to Increasing the Likelihood of Having a Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder
A recent publication from researchers at the UC Davis EPA/NIEHS Children’s Center in the journal Pediatrics found strong links between maternal diabetes and obesity, and the likelihood of having a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or other developmental disorders.  Autism spectrum disorder is characterized by impairments in social interaction, communication deficits and repetitive behaviors and often is accompanied by intellectual disability.
[Read More]

Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers (with NIEHS)
EPA and NIEHS have issued a joint solicitation under their Children's Environmental Health Research program for: (1) the expanded use of epidemiological and clinical data from studies of prospective parents, pregnant women and children; (2)the application of novel findings and approaches in areas of basic or mechanistic research e.g., imaging, epigenetics and comparative biology to developmental human studies; (3) development and use of new or improved biomarkers, environmental measurements (indoors and outdoors) and exposure factors and models to best characterize exposure, potential health effects at various lifestages, and predict longer-term clinical consequences; (4) the training of new investigators to address emerging issues in children's environmental health with state of the art tools and methodologies; and (5) the active participation of identified stakeholders and the broader community in the research process and translation and application of research findings.
[Read More]

Pregnant woman with Personal Air Sampling device Prenatal Exposure to Combustion-Related Pollutants Linked to Symptoms of Anxiety, Depression, and Attention Problems in Young Children
STAR researchers at  Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health have published results which associate prenatal exposure to air pollutants called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) with  behavioral problems in children.
[Read More]

Brian Jackson Food Products Containing Organic Brown Rice Syrup may be an Unsuspected Source of Dietary Arsenic
Researchers at the EPA/NIEHS Dartmouth Children's Center have found that rice-related ingredients such as organic brown rice syrup in food products are a potential source of arsenic in diets.
[Read More]


Philippe  Grandjean PFCs May Cause Lowered Immune Response
EPA STAR researcher Philippe Grandjean (and others) have published a paper in JAMA which shows evidence that suggests that  children’s exposure to perflourinated compunds can lower the effectiveness of childhood vaccines by lowering their ability to make antibodies for tetanus and diptheria later in life. (CFDA: 66.509)
[Read More]


Child on Scale STAR Researchers Find Phthalate Exposure Related to Obesity
Mt Sinai researchers have published a paper in the journal Environmental Research called Associations between phthalate metabolite urinary concentrations and body size measures in New York City children.
[Read More]

Grant Applications Sought

Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers (P50)
EPA and NIEHS have jointly issued a solicitation for grant applications to support a transdisciplinary program of basic and applied research to examine the effects of environmental factors on children’s health and well-being. Research conducted through the Centers should include substantive areas of science in children’s health while incorporating innovative technologies and approaches and links to the environment. This program encourages strong links between disciplines in the basic, applied, clinical and public health sciences to prevent disease and promote health of all children. 

Read More:

Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers (P50)
Open: September 30, 2014
Letters of Intent Due November 22, 2014
Closing: December 22, 2014

Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers (with NIEHS)
EPA and NIEHS have issued a joint solicitation under their Children's Environmental Health Research program for: (1) the expanded use of epidemiological and clinical data from studies of prospective parents, pregnant women and children; (2) the application of novel findings and approaches in areas of basic or mechanistic research e.g., imaging, epigenetics and comparative biology to developmental human studies; (3) development and use of new or improved biomarkers, environmental measurements (indoors and outdoors) and exposure factors and models to best characterize exposure, potential health effects at various lifestages, and predict longer-term clinical consequences; (4) the training of new investigators to address emerging issues in children's environmental health with state of the art tools and methodologies; and (5) the active participation of identified stakeholders and the broader community in the research process and translation and application of research findings.
[Read More]

Archives

Centers Funded By:
Centers Funded by Epa and NIEHS

Top of page

Jump to main content.