Jump to main content or area navigation.

Contact Us

Extramural Research

Bibliometrics

Research Project Search

Extramural Research Search

Bibliometric Analysis for Papers on Topics Related to Particulate Matter (PM)

March 2005 Report
Revised September 2007


This is a bibliometric analysis of the papers prepared by intramural and extramural researchers of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on topics related to particulate matter (PM). For this analysis, 904 papers were reviewed. These 904 papers, published from 1998 to 2005, were cited 9,578 times in the journals covered by Thomson’s Web of Science.1 Of these 904 papers, 723 (80%) have been cited at least once in a journal.

The analysis was completed using Thomson’s Essential Science Indicators (ESI) and Journal Citation Reports (JCR) as benchmarks. ESI provides access to a unique and comprehensive compilation of essential science performance statistics and science trends data derived from Thomson’s databases. The chief indicators of output, or productivity, are journal article publication counts. For influence and impact measures, ESI employs both total citation counts and cites per paper scores. The former reveals gross influence while the latter shows weighted influence, also called impact. JCR presents quantifiable statistical data that provide a systematic, objective way to evaluate the world’s leading journals and their impact and influence in the global research community.

Summary of Analysis

More than one-quarter of the PM publications are highly cited papers. A review of the citations indicates that 258 (28.5%) of the PM papers qualify as highly cited when using the ESI criteria for the top 10% of highly cited publications. Forty-nine (5.4%) of the PM papers qualify as highly cited when using the criteria for the top 1%. Twelve (1.3%) of these papers qualify as very highly cited (in the top 0.1%), and two papers (0.2% of the papers analyzed) actually meet the top 0.01% threshold.

The PM papers are more highly cited than the average paper. Using the ESI average citation rates for papers published by field as the benchmark, in 10 of the 14 fields in which the EPA PM papers were published, the ratio of actual to expected cites is greater than 1, indicating that the PM papers are more highly cited than the average papers in those fields. For all 14 fields combined, the ratio of actual cites to expected cites is 2.3, indicating that the PM papers are more highly cited than the average paper.

Nearly one-third of the PM papers are published in very high impact journals. Two-hundred fifty-four (254) of 904 papers were published in the top 10% of journals ranked by JCR Impact Factor, representing 28% of EPA’s PM papers. Nearly one-third of the PM papers are published in the top 10% of journals ranked by JCR Immediacy Index. Two-hundred sixty-seven (267) of the 904 papers appear in the top 10% of journals, representing 29.5% of EPA’s PM papers.

Seventeen of the PM papers qualify as hot papers. Using the hot paper thresholds established by ESI as a benchmark, 17 hot papers, representing 1.9% of the PM papers, were identified in the analysis.

The authors cite themselves less than the average author. Five hundred thirty-seven (537) of the 9,578 cites are author self-cites. This 5.6% author self-citation rate is below the accepted range of 10-30% author self-citation rate.

Highly Cited PM Publications

The 904 PM papers reviewed for this analysis covered 14 of the 22 ESI fields. The distribution of the papers among these 14 fields and the number of citations by field are presented in Table 1.

Table 1. PM Papers by ESI Fields

ESI Field

No. of Citations

No. of EPA PM Papers

Average Cites/Paper

Clinical Medicine

2,441

157

15.55

Environment/Ecology

2,102

171

12.29

Geosciences

1,607

170

9.45

Engineering

1,256

176

7.14

Pharmacology & Toxicology

1,166

123

9.48

Chemistry

372

50

7.44

Biology & Biochemistry

197

20

9.85

Multidisciplinary

157

4

39.25

Immunology

155

8

19.37

Physics

73

10

7.30

Neuroscience & Behavior

30

4

7.50

Plant & Animal Sciences

12

3

4.00

Mathematics

7

4

1.75

Social Sciences

3

4

0.75

 

Total = 9,578

Total = 904

10.6

There were 258 (28.5% of the papers analyzed) highly cited EPA PM papers in 10 of the 14 fields in which the papers are published—Environment/Ecology, Engineering, Pharmacology & Toxicology, Clinical Medicine, Multidisciplinary, Biology & Biochemistry, Chemistry, Molecular Biology & Genetics, Immunology, and Mathematics—when using the ESI criteria for the top 10% of papers. Table 2 shows the number of EPA papers in those 10 fields that met the top 10% threshold in ESI. Forty-nine (5.4%) of the papers analyzed qualified as highly cited when using the ESI criteria for the top 1% of papers. These papers covered five fields—Clinical Medicine, Engineering, Environment/Ecology, Geosciences, and Multidisciplinary. Table 3 shows the 49 papers by field that met the top 1% threshold in ESI. The citations for these 49 papers are provided in Tables 4 through 8. There were 12 very highly cited EPA PM papers in three fields—Engineering, Environment/Ecology, and Clinical Medicine (see Table 9). These 12 papers met the top 0.1% threshold in ESI (1.3% of the papers analyzed). The citations for these 12 very highly cited papers are listed in Table 10. Two (0.2% of the papers analyzed) of the PM papers actually met the top 0.01% threshold in ESI (see Table 11). These papers are presented in Table 12.

Table 2. Number of Highly Cited PM Papers by Field (top 10%)

ESI Field

No. of Citations

No. of Papers

Average Cites/Paper

% of EPA Papers in Field

Environment/Ecology

1,593

70

22.8

40.9%

Clinical Medicine

1,459

26

56.1

16.6%

Geosciences

1,176

59

19.9

34.7%

Engineering

1,028

70

14.7

39.8%

Pharmacology & Toxicology

570

16

35.6

13.0%

Chemistry

193

8

24.1

16.0%

Multidisciplinary

153

3

51.0

75.0%

Immunology

119

3

39.7

37.5%

Biology & Biochemistry

28

1

28.0

5.0%

Mathematics

5

2

2.5

50.0%

 

Total = 6,324

Total = 258

24.51

28.5%

Table 3. Number of Highly Cited PM Papers by Field (top 1%)

ESI Field

No. of Citations

No. of Papers

Average Cites/Paper

% of EPA Papers in Field

Clinical Medicine

619

4

154.8

2.6%

Engineering

615

26

23.6

14.8%

Environment/Ecology

446

12

37.2

7.0%

Geosciences

328

5

65.6

2.9%

Multidisciplinary

88

1

88.0

25.0%

 

Total = 2,096

Total = 49

42.8

5.4%

Table 4. Highly Cited PM Papers in the Field of Clinical Medicine (top 1%)

No. of Cites

First Author

Paper

275

Pope CA

Lung cancer, cardiopulmonary mortality, and long-term exposure to fine particulate air pollution. JAMA-Journal of the American Medical Association 2002;287(9):1132-1141.

124

Abbey DE

Long-term inhalable particles and other air pollutants related to mortality in nonsmokers. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 1999;159(2):373-382.

124

Gold DR

Ambient pollution and heart rate variability. Circulation 2000;101(11):1267-1273.

96

Peters A

Increased particulate air pollution and the triggering of myocardial infarction. Circulation 2001;103(23):2810-2815.

Table 5. Highly Cited PM Papers in the Field of Engineering (top 1%)

No. of Cites

First Author

Paper

75

Jayne JT

Development of an aerosol mass spectrometer for size and composition analysis of submicron particles. Aerosol Science and Technology 2000;33(1-2):49-70.

56

Weber RJ

A particle-into-liquid collector for rapid measurement of aerosol bulk chemical composition. Aerosol Science and Technology 2001;35(3):718-727.

50

Woo KS

Measurement of Atlanta aerosol size distributions: Observations of ultrafine particle events. Aerosol Science and Technology 2001;34(1):75-87.

40

Long CM

Characterization of indoor particle sources using continuous mass and size monitors. Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 2000;50(7):1236-1250.

40

Sarnat JA

Assessing the relationship between personal particulate and gaseous exposures of senior citizens living in Baltimore, MD. Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 2000;50(7):1184-1198.

35

Zhu YF

Concentration and size distribution of ultrafine particles near a major highway. Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 2002;52(9):1032-1042.

33

Zhang Y

Simulation of aerosol dynamics: A comparative review of algorithms used in air quality models. Aerosol Science and Technology 1999;31(6):487-514.

31

Lewtas J

Comparison of sampling methods for semi-volatile organic carbon associated with PM2.5. Aerosol Science and Technology 2001;34 (1):9-22.

28

McMurry PH

The relationship between mass and mobility for atmospheric particles: A new technique for measuring particle density. Aerosol Science and Technology 2002;36(2):227-238.

26

Christoforou CS

Trends in fine particle concentration and chemical composition in Southern California. Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 2000;50(1):43-53.

25

Mallina RV

High speed particle beam generation: A dynamic focusing mechanism for selecting ultrafine particles. Aerosol Science and Technology 2000;33(1-2):87-104.

23

Tolocka MP

East versus West in the US: Chemical characteristics of PM2.5 during the winter of 1999. Aerosol Science and Technology 2001;34(1):88-96.

21

Mosley RB

Penetration of ambient fine particles into the indoor environment. Aerosol Science and Technology 2001;34(1):127-136.

19

Vette AF

Characterization of indoor-outdoor aerosol concentration relationships during the Fresno PM exposure studies. Aerosol Science and Technology 2001;34(1):118-126.

15

Phares DJ

Performance of a single ultrafine particle mass spectrometer. Aerosol Science and Technology 2002;36(5):583-592.

14

Zhang XF

A numerical characterization of particle beam collimation by an aerodynamic lens-nozzle system: Part I. An individual lens or nozzle. Aerosol Science and Technology 2002;36(5):617-631.

13

Frey HC

Quantification of variability and uncertainty in lawn and garden equipment NOx and total hydrocarbon emission factors. Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 2002;52(4):435-448.

13

Kim S

Size distribution and diurnal and seasonal trends of ultrafine particles in source and receptor sites of the Los Angeles basin. Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 2002;52(3):297-307.

12

Lewis CW

Source apportionment of phoenix PM2.5 aerosol with the Unmix receptor model. Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 2003;53(3):325-338.

11

Drewnick F

Measurement of ambient aerosol composition during the PMTACS-NY 2001 using an aerosol mass spectrometer. Part I: Mass concentrations. Aerosol Science and Technology 2004;38 (Suppl 1):92-103.

8

Drewnick F

Measurement of ambient aerosol composition during the PMTACS-NY 2001 using an aerosol mass spectrometer. Part II: Chemically speciated mass distributions. Aerosol Science and Technology 2004;38(Suppl 1):104-117.

7

Cho AK

Determination of four quinones in diesel exhaust particles, SRM 1649a, an atmospheric PM2.5. Aerosol Science and Technology 2004;38(Suppl 1):68-81.

6

Stanier CO

Nucleation events during the Pittsburgh air quality study: Description and relation to key meteorological, gas phase, and aerosol parameters. Aerosol Science and Technology 2004;38(Suppl 1):253-264.

6

Hogrefe O

Development, operation and applications of an aerosol generation, calibration and research facility. Aerosol Science and Technology 2004;38(Suppl 1):196-214.

5

Canagaratna MR

Chase studies of particulate emissions from in-use New York City vehicles. Aerosol Science and Technology 2004;38(6):555-573.

3

Stanier CO

A method for the in situ measurement of fine aerosol water content of ambient aerosols: The dry-ambient aerosol size spectrometer (DAASS). Aerosol Science and Technology 2004;38(Suppl 1):215-228.

Table 6. Highly Cited PM Papers in the Field of Environment/Ecology (top 1%)

No. of Cites

First Author

Paper

110

Liao DP

Daily variation of particulate air pollution and poor cardiac autonomic control in the elderly. Environmental Health Perspectives 1999;107(7):521-525.

96

Laden F

Association of fine particulate matter from different sources with daily mortality in six US cities. Environmental Health Perspectives 2000;108(10):941-947.

69

Oberdorster G

Pulmonary effects of inhaled ultrafine particles. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health 2001;74(1):1-8.

43

Dockery DW

Epidemiologic evidence of cardiovascular effects of particulate air pollution. Environmental Health Perspectives 2001;109(Suppl 4):483-486.

41

Li N

Ultrafine particulate pollutants induce oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Environmental Health Perspectives 2003;111(4):455-460.

32

Lioy PJ

Characterization of the dust/smoke aerosol that settled east of the World Trade Center (WTC) in Lower Manhattan after the collapse of the WTC 11 September 2001. Environmental Health Perspectives 2002;110(7):703-714.

20

Park K

Relationship between particle mass and mobility for diesel exhaust particles. Environmental Science & Technology 2003;37(3):577-583.

12

Offenberg JH

Persistent organic pollutants in the dusts that settled across lower Manhattan after September 11, 2001. Environmental Science & Technology 2003;37(3):502-508.

11

McGee JK

Chemical analysis of World Trade Center fine particulate matter for use in toxicologic assessment. Environmental Health Perspectives 2003;111(7):972-980.

4

DeMarini DM

Bioassay-directed fractionation and Salmonella mutagenicity of automobile and forklift diesel exhaust particles. Environmental Health Perspectives 2004;112(8):814-819.

4

Landrigan PJ

Health and environmental consequences of the World Trade Center disaster. Environmental Health Perspectives 2004;112(6):731-739.

4

Singh P

Sample characterization of automobile and forklift diesel exhaust particles and comparative pulmonary toxicity in mice. Environmental Health Perspectives 2004;112(8):820-825.

Table 7. Highly Cited PM Papers in the Field of Geosciences (top 1%)

No. of Cites

First Author

Paper

97

Yu JZ

Gas-phase ozone oxidation of monoterpenes gaseous and particulate products. Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry 1999;34(2):107-258.

92

Simoneit BRT

Levoglucosan, a tracer for cellulose in biomass burning and atmospheric particles. Atmospheric Environment 1999;33(2):173-182.

86

Griffin RJ

Organic aerosol formation from the oxidation of biogenic carbons. Journal of Geophysical Research – Atmospheres 1999;104(D3):3555-3567.

32

Zhu YF

Study of ultrafine particles near a major highway with heavy-duty diesel traffic. Atmospheric Environment 2002;36(27):4323-4335.

21

Orsini DA

Refinements to the particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) for ground and airborne measurements of water soluble aerosol composition. Atmospheric Environment 2003;37(9-10):1243-1259.

Table 8. Highly Cited PM Papers in the Field of Multidisciplinary (top 1%)

No. of Cites

First Author

Paper

88

Gard EE

Direct observation of heterogeneous chemistry in the atmosphere. Science 1998;279(5354):1184-1187.

Table 9. Number of Highly Cited PM Papers by Field (top 0.1%)

ESI Field

No. of Citations

No. of Papers

Average Cites/Paper

% of EPA Papers in Field

Clinical Medicine

275

1

275.0

%

Engineering

259

10

25.9

14.8%

Environment/Ecology

41

1

41.0

7.0%

 

Total = 575

Total = 12

47.9

1.3%

Table 10. Very Highly Cited PM Papers (Top 0.1%)

Field

No. of Cites

First Author

Paper

Clinical Medicine

275

Pope CA

Lung cancer, cardiopulmonary mortality, and long-term exposure to fine particulate air pollution. JAMA-Journal of the American Medical Association 2002;287(9):1132-1141.

Engineering

75

Jayne JT

Development of an aerosol mass spectrometer for size and composition analysis of submicron particles. Aerosol Science and Technology 2000;33(1-2):49-70.

Engineering

56

Weber RJ

A particle-into-liquid collector for rapid measurement of aerosol bulk chemical composition. Aerosol Science and Technology 2001;35(3):718-727.

 

50

Woo KS

Measurement of Atlanta aerosol size distributions: observations of ultrafine particle events. Aerosol Science and Technology 2001;34(1):75-87.

 

35

Zhu YF

Concentration and size distribution of ultrafine particles near a major highway. Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 2002;52(9):1032-1042.

 

11

Drewnick

Measurement of ambient aerosol composition during the PMTACS-NY 2001 using an aerosol mass spectrometer. Part I: Mass concentrations. Aerosol Science and Technology 2004;38 (Suppl 1):92-103.

 

8

Drewnick

Measurement of ambient aerosol composition during the PMTACS-NY 2001 using an aerosol mass spectrometer. Part II: Chemically speciated mass distributions. Aerosol Science and Technology 2004;38(Suppl 1):104-117.

 

7

Cho AK

Determination of four quinones in diesel exhaust particles, SRM 1649a, an atmospheric PM2.5. Aerosol Science and Technology 2004;38(Suppl 1):68-81.

 

6

Hogrefe O

Development, operation and applications of an aerosol generation, calibration and research facility. Aerosol Science and Technology 2004;38(Suppl 1):196-214.

 

6

Stanier CO

Nucleation events during the Pittsburgh air quality study: Description and relation to key meteorological, gas phase, and aerosol parameters. Aerosol Science and Technology 2004;38(Suppl 1):253-264.

 

5

Canagaratna MR

Chase studies of particulate emissions from in-use New York City vehicles. Aerosol Science and Technology 2004;38(6):555-573.

Environment/
Ecology

41

Li N

Ultrafine particulate pollutants induce oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Environmental Health Perspectives 2003;111(4):455-460.

Table 11. Number of Extremely Highly Cited PM Papers by Field (top 0.01%)

ESI Field

No. of Citations

No. of Papers

Average Cites/Paper

% of EPA Papers in Field

Engineering

19

2

9.5

0.2%

 

Total = 19

Total = 2

9.5

0.2%

Table 12. Extremely Highly Cited PM Papers (Top 0.01%)

Field

No. of Cites

First Author

Paper

Engineering

11

Drewnick

Measurement of ambient aerosol composition during the PMTACS-NY 2001 using an aerosol mass spectrometer. Part I: Mass concentrations. Aerosol Science and Technology 2004;38 (Suppl 1):92-103.

 

8

Drewnick

Measurement of ambient aerosol composition during the PMTACS-NY 2001 using an aerosol mass spectrometer. Part II: Chemically speciated mass distributions. Aerosol Science and Technology 2004;38(Suppl 1):104-117.

Ratio of Actual Cites to Expected Citation Rates

The expected citation rate is the average number of cites that a paper published in the same journal in the same year and of the same document type (article, review, editorial, etc.) has received from the year of publication to the present. Using the ESI average citation rates for papers published by field as the benchmark, in 10 of the 14 fields in which the EPA PM papers were published, the ratio of actual to expected cites is greater than 1, indicating that the EPA papers are more highly cited than the average papers in those fields. For all 14 fields combined, the ratio of actual to expected cites (9,578 to 4,116.80) is 2.3, indicating that the PM papers are more highly cited than the average paper (see Table 13).

Table 13. Ratio of Average Cites to Expected Cites for PM Papers by Field

ESI Field

Total Cites

Expected Cite Rate

Ratio

Biology & Biochemistry

197

218.48

0.9

Chemistry

372

277.52

1.3

Clinical Medicine

2,441

1,003.49

2.4

Engineering

1,256

275.21

4.6

Environment/Ecology

2,102

713.18

2.9

Geosciences

1,607

665.28

2.4

Immunology

155

103.32

1.5

Mathematics

7

2.50

2.8

Multidisciplinary

157

21.22

7.4

Neuroscience & Behavior

30

34.01

0.9

Pharmacology & Toxicology

1,166

714.26

1.6

Physics

73

45.02

1.6

Plant & Animal Science

12

39.24

0.3

Social Sciences

3

4.07

0.7

Totals

9,578

4,116.80

2.3

JCR Benchmarks

The Impact Factor is a well known metric in citation analysis. It is a measure of the frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year. The Impact Factor helps evaluate a journal’s relative importance, especially when compared to others in the same field. The Impact Factor is calculated by dividing the number of citations in the current year to articles published in the 2 previous years by the total number of articles published in the 2 previous years.

Table 14 indicates the number of PM papers published in the top 10% of journals, based on the JCR Impact Factor. Two hundred fifty-four (254) of 904 papers were published in the top 10% of journals, representing 28% of EPA’s PM papers.

Table 14. PM Papers in Top 10% of Journals by JCR Impact Factor

EPA PM Papers in that Journal

Journal

Impact Factor
(IF)

JCR IF Rank

64

Environmental Health Perspectives

3.408

538

62

Environmental Science & Technology

3.592

487

26

American Journal of Physiology-Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology

3.735

435

20

Epidemiology

4.220

350

17

American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

8.876

100

17

American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology

4.015

380

7

Analytical Chemistry

5.250

248

5

Circulation

11.164

72

4

Journal of Biological Chemistry

6.482

179

4

Journal of Immunology

6.702

167

3

Science

29.781

11

3

Free Radical Biology and Medicine

5.063

260

3

American Journal of Epidemiology

4.486

310

3

Thorax

4.188

356

2

Lancet

18.316

28

2

Chest

3.264

585

2

Chemical Research in Toxicology

3.332

555

1

New England Journal of Medicine

34.833

5

1

JAMA-Journal of the American Medical Association

21.455

22

1

Journal of Clinical Investigation

14.307

44

1

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

10.272

81

1

Cancer Research

8.649

105

1

FASEB Journal

7.172

149

1

Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

6.831

162

1

Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews

6.588

170

1

Critical Care Medicine

4.195

353

1

Journal of Leukocyte Biology

4.180

357

Total = 254

 

 

 

Immediacy Index

The journal Immediacy Index is a measure of how quickly the average article in a journal is cited. It indicates how often articles published in a journal are cited within the year they are published. The Immediacy Index is calculated by dividing the number of citations to articles published in a given year by the number of articles published in that year.

Table 15 indicates the number of EPA papers published in the top 10% of journals, based on the JCR Immediacy Index. Two-hundred sixty-seven (267) of the 904 papers appear in the top 10% of journals, representing 29.5% of EPA’s PM papers.

Table 15. PM Papers in Top 10% of Journals by JCR Immediacy Index

EPA Papers in that Journal

Journal

Immediacy Index
(II)

JCR II Rank

64

Environmental Health Perspectives

0.869

304

52

Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres

0.827

334

26

American Journal of Physiology-Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology

0.654

496

20

Epidemiology

0.938

264

19

Journal of Aerosol Science

0.686

462

17

American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology

0.623

546

17

American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

2.461

56

7

Analytical Chemistry

0.657

493

5

Circulation

1.946

82

4

Journal of Immunology

0.988

239

4

Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London Series A-Mathematical Physical and Engineering Sciences

0.867

305

4

Journal of Biological Chemistry

1.231

160

3

American Journal of Epidemiology

0.908

281

3

Free Radical Biology and Medicine

0.712

432

3

Thorax

1.237

158

3

Science

5.589

12

2

Biometals

0.717

424

2

Lancet

5.826

10

1

Journal of Chemical Physics

0.661

487

1

Journal of Clinical Investigation

2.946

41

1

Critical Care Medicine

1.103

192

1

Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

1.465

123

1

Journal of Leukocyte Biology

0.671

473

1

Cancer Research

0.935

268

1

FASEB Journal

1.247

154

1

New England Journal of Medicine

11.719

2

1

Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews

0.805

352

1

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

1.935

83

1

American Journal of Industrial Medicine

0.616

552

1

JAMA-Journal of the American Medical Association

6.048

9

Total = 267

 

 

 

Hot Papers

ESI establishes citation thresholds for hot papers, which are selected from the highly cited papers in different fields, but the time frame for citing and cited papers is much shorter—papers must be cited within 2 years of publication and the citations must occur in a 2-month time period. Papers are assigned to 2-month periods and thresholds are set for each period and field to select 0.1% of papers. There were no hot papers identified for the current 2-month period (i.e., January-February 2005), but there were a number of hot papers identified from previous periods.

Using the hot paper thresholds established by ESI as a benchmark, 17 hot papers, representing 1.9% of the PM papers, were identified in four fields—Clinical Medicine, Geosciences, Environment/Ecology, and Engineering. The hot papers are listed in Table 16.

Table 16. Hot Papers Identified Using ESI Thresholds

Field

ESI Hot Papers Threshold

No. of Cites in 2-Month Period

Paper

Clinical Medicine

12

15 cites in November-December 2003

Pope CA, et al. Lung cancer, cardiopulmonary mortality, and long-term exposure to fine particulate air pollution. JAMA–Journal of the American Medical Association 2002;287(9):1132-1141.

Geosciences

10

10 cites in June-July 2004

Orsini DA, et al. Refinements to the particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) for ground and airborne measurements of water soluble aerosol composition. Atmospheric Environment 2003;37(9-10):1243-1259.

Environment/ Ecology

8

9 cites in May-June 2004

Li N, et al. Ultrafine particle pollutants induce oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Environmental Health Perspectives 2003;111(4):455-460.

 

9

9 cites in September-October 2002

Laden F, et al. Association of fine particulate matter from different sources with daily mortality in six US cities. Environmental Health Perspectives 2000;108(10):941-947.

 

8

9 cites in April-May 2004

Lioy PJ, et al. Characterization of the dust/smoke aerosol that settled east of the World Trade Center (WTC) in Lower Manhattan after the collapse of the WTC 11 September 2001. Environmental Health Perspectives 2002;110(7):703-714.

 

7

7 cites in September- October 2003

Jang MS, Kamens RM. Atmospheric secondary aerosol formation by heterogeneous reactions of aldehydes in the presence of a sulfuric acid aerosol catalyst. Environmental Science & Technology 2001;35(24):4758-4766.

 

3

4 cites in July-August 2000

Stolzenburg MR, Hering SV. Method for the automated measurement of fine particle nitrate in the atmosphere. Environmental Science & Technology 2000;34(5):907-914.

Engineering

4

4 cites in July 2002

Long CM, et al. Characterization of indoor particle sources using continuous mass and size monitors. Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 2000;50(7):1236-1250.

Engineering

4

4 cites in May-June 2002

Jayne JT, et al. Development of an aerosol mass spectrometer for size and composition analysis of submicron particles. Aerosol Science and Technology 2000;33(1-2):49-70.

 

4

4 cites in May 2002

Mallina RV, et al. High speed particle beam generation: a dynamic focusing mechanism for selecting ultrafine particles. Aerosol Science and Technology 2000;33(1-2):87-104.

 

4

4 cites in November-December 2001

Christoforou CS, et al. Trends in fine particle concentration and chemical composition in Southern California. Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 2000;50(1):43-53.

 

4

4 cites in June-July 2002

Sarnat JA, et al. Assessing the relationship between personal particulate and gaseous exposures of senior citizens living in Baltimore, MD. Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 2000;50(7):1184-1198.

 

4

4 cites in February-March 2003

McMurry PH, et al. The relationship between mass and mobility for atmospheric particles: a new technique for measuring particle density. Aerosol Science and Technology 2002;36(2):227-238.

 

5

6 cites in April-May 2004

Zhu YF, et al. Concentration and size distribution of ultrafine particles near a major highway. Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 2002;52(9):1032-1042.

 

4

4 cites in April-May 2004

Offenberg JH, et al. Persistent organic pollutants in the dusts that settled across lower Manhattan after September 11, 2001. Environmental Science & Technology 2003;37(3):502-508.

 

3

4 cites in November 2004

Canagaratna MR, et al. Chase studies of particulate emissions from in-use New York City vehicles. Aerosol Science and Technology 2004;38(6):555-573.

 

3

4 cites in November-December 2004

Drewnick F, et al. Measurement of ambient aerosol composition during the PMTACS-NY 2001 using an aerosol mass spectrometer, Part I: mass concentrations. Aerosol Science and Technology 2004;38(Suppl 1):92-103.

Author Self-Citation

Self-citations are journal article references to articles from that same author (i.e., the first author). Because higher author self-citation rates can inflate the number of citations, the author self-citation rate was calculated for the PM papers. Of the 9,578 total cites, 537 are author self-cites—a 5.6% author self-citation rate. Garfield and Sher2 found that authors working in research-based disciplines tend to cite themselves on the average of 20% of the time. MacRoberts and MacRoberts3 claim that approximately 10% to 30% of all the citations listed fall into the category of author self-citation. Therefore, the 5.6% self-cite rate for the PM papers is below the range for author self-citation.

1 Thomson’s Web of Science provides access to current and retrospective multidisciplinary information from approximately 8,700 of the most prestigious, high impact research journals in the world. Web of Science also provides cited reference searching.

2 Garfield E, Sher IH. New factors in the evaluation of scientific literature through citation indexing. American Documentation 1963;18(July):195-201.

3 MacRoberts MH, MacRoberts BR. Problems of citation analysis: a critical review. Journal of the American Society of Information Science 1989;40(5):342-349.

You will need Adobe Reader to view some of the files on this page. See EPA's PDF page to learn more.

Top of page

Jump to main content.