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Region 5 Framework for Addressing Climate Change and Clean Energy

The priorities for the Midwest and Great Lakes derive from the Administrator's action plan; the Agency's emerging work in Eco-Regions; joint priorities negotiated with states and tribes and finally, the measures used to track the Region's annual performance. In addressing these priorities, Region 5 will ensure that decisions and actions are consistent with the Administrator's principles of Results and Accountability; Innovation and Collaboration and Best Available Science. In keeping with the principles, the Region, through partnerships with state, tribal and local environmental regulators, will work to protect human health and the environment by fostering stewardship and furthering voluntary efforts while ensuring compliance with environmental laws through assistance and vigorous enforcement.

Printable version of the Region 5 Framework for Addressing Climate Change and Clean Energy (PDF) (2pp, 143K, About PDF)

Introduction

EPA Region 5 recognizes the need to address climate change and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in our six states. Climate models predict increased variability in precipitation, with longer droughts and larger storms, boosting the need for water conservation and prevention of sewer overflows. With our public and private partners, we will evaluate our programs and policies for opportunities to address the effects of climate change on the environment and to promote energy efficiency, clean energy, cleaner transportation practices and sustainable development. Many governments and organizations in the region are working to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Region 5 will use its leadership role to add value to these efforts by focusing on:

We will engage and promote environmental stewardship among key stakeholders in Region 5 including the public; federal, state, tribal and local governments; and electric power utilities and other large companies.

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Changing how our energy is produced

One-third of greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. come from electric power generation. Seventy percent of the region's electricity is generated from coal, which produces more greenhouse gas emissions per kilowatt produced than other fossil fuels. We will:

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Changing how our energy is used

Electricity and fuel use in homes, commercial buildings and industries result in 62 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions (17, 17, and 28 percent, respectively). Transportation contributes much of the rest—28 percent. We will:

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Changing how materials, products and waste are managed

Reducing waste and increasing recycling and reuse of materials saves energy and reduces greenhouse gas emissions by avoiding effects associated with resource extraction and waste disposal. We will:

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Integrating climate change considerations into Agency operations and core programs

We will:

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