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Hartford Area Hydrocarbon Plume Site

Site Information
  • Hartford, IL (Madison County)
Contact Information

Community Involvement Coordinator
Teresa Jones
(jones.teresa@epa.gov)
312-886-0725

On-Scene Coordinators
Steve Faryan (faryan.steven@epa.gov)
312-353-9351

Kevin Turner (turner.kevin@epa.gov)
618-997-0115

Illinois EPA Community Relations Coordinator
Mara McGinnis (mara.mcginnis@epa.state.il.us)
217-524-3288

Illinois EPA Collinsville Regional Office, Manager
Chris Cahnovsky (chris.cahnovsky@epa.state.il.us)
618-346-5120

Illinois Department of Public Health
Edwardsville Regional Office
618-656-6680
Environmental Toxicologists
Cathy Copley (ccopley@idph.state.il.us)
Dave Webb (dwebb@idph.state.il.us)

Repositories

(where to view written records)

Hartford Public Library
143 W. Hawthorne
Hartford, IL 62048
(618) 254-9394

Hours:
Monday-Thursday 12-6 pm
Friday-Saturday 12-4 pm
Closed Sunday

You will need the free Adobe Reader to view some of the files on this page. See EPA's PDF page to learn more.

Site Updates

EPA plans to conduct a test that will help the Agency learn the best way to remove trapped gasoline from beneath a portion of Hartford.  The test is called a “focused pumping” test. It will be done near the 300 block of North Olive Avenue, referred to as Area A.

Groundwater in Hartford moves up and down – more shallow or more deep – depending on things such as rain, drought or the Mississippi River level.  There is gasoline trapped below the groundwater, and the changing water level makes it difficult to clean up the gasoline.

By using “focused pumping,” U.S. EPA can pump a significant amount of groundwater out of the ground when water levels are naturally low. That causes the water level around the well to drop further, and the gasoline rises up through the soil to take its place.

The idea is to move the groundwater out of the way so workers can then pump the gasoline out of the ground.  If the water is not moved out of the way, the gasoline remains trapped and remains an environmental and public health problem.

Legal Agreements

Public Meetings

Photos

Some wells like this one have already been installed in Area A, where the test pumping will be done.

Some wells like this one have already been installed in Area A, where the test pumping will be done.

The shaded area on this map shows where EPA will conduct testing to clean up gasoline that is trapped underground.

The shaded area on this map shows where EPA will conduct testing to clean up gasoline that is trapped underground.

 


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