Jump to main content.


National Award for Smart Growth Achievement 2004 Winners

National Award for Smart Growth Achievement 2003

This publication is also available as a PDF (20 pp, 2.3MB, About PDF).

A MESSAGE FROM THE ADMINISTRATOR
Michael O. Leavitt, EPA Administrator National Award for Smart Growth Achievement logo

Congratulations to the winners of EPA's National Award for Smart Growth Achievement! EPA is proud to recognize these exceptional communities that are creating healthy, attractive, and enduring places to live, work, and play.

Innovative efforts across the country are preserving critical areas, protecting historic buildings, and providing better transportation choices that protect the environment. More and more cities are using creative strategies to enhance neighborhoods and re-use existing infrastructure.

This year, EPA is especially pleased to celebrate the extraordinary efforts of small communities. Small towns are taking advantage of their assets-such as historic buildings, walkable downtowns, lakes, and other natural features-to revitalize their economies. Small communities are preserving the unique character that makes them special and strengthens their neighborhoods, while also accommodating development that is environmentally sound.

This year's winners are excellent models of smart growth achievement. I salute these winners for their outstanding achievements and challenge others to follow their example in protecting the environment and improving the quality of life of our great nation.

Michael O. Leavitt
EPA Administrator

Top of page

SMART GROWTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Communities all over the United States are using the principles of smart growth to protect and enhance their natural environment while their economies prosper. They are reusing previously developed land; providing more housing and transportation choices; preserving critical natural areas; and developing vibrant places to live, work, shop, and play. These techniques can protect our air, water, and land and enhance quality of life, 1, 2 as the following examples demonstrate:

· A new development in Florida transformed a former shopping mall and parking lots into 272 apartments and townhouses, 270,000 square feet of office space, and 245,000 square feet of retail space.3 The new development decreased the amount of paved surface by approximately 15 percent by adding a central plaza, flower and tree planters, and a large public amphitheater. Reducing paved surfaces at the site also reduces the amount of polluted runoff.

· Research comparing three in-town neighborhoods in a Pacific Northwest city against the rest of the region showed strong links between compact, mixed-use development and travel choices. With more transportation options, residents of the compact neighborhoods traveled 28 percent fewer miles by car than residents of adjacent neighborhoods, and 35 percent fewer miles than residents of outlying areas.4 Shorter and fewer car trips can lead to fewer auto emissions, cleaner air, and less time spent in traffic.

· New Jersey encourages development in places with existing infrastructure, which strengthens communities and preserves rural cultures and economies. By doing so, the state will save 68,000 acres of agricultural land and 45,000 acres of environmentally sensitive land from development.5

award photo
Buffer areas that protect water quality around lakes, rivers and streams can also serve as a public amenity.

For more information about the environmental benefits of smart growth, please see: www.epa.gov/smartgrowth/


1 U.S. EPA. 2003. EPA's Draft Report on the Environment Technical Document. EPA 600-R-03-050.
2 U.S. EPA. 2001. Our Built and Natural Environments. EPA 231-R-01-002.
3 Cooper Carry (Architects). 2004. Projects: Mizner Park. Accessed October 14, 2004 from www.coopercarry.com/4/4e1c.html.
4 McCormack, Edward, G. Scott Rutherford, and Martina Wilkinson. 2001. "Travel Impacts of Mixed Land Use Neighborhoods in Seattle, Washington," Transportation Research Record; Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No. 1780, pp 24-32.
5 Burchell, Robert W. 2000. The Costs and Benefits of Alternative Growth Patterns: The Impact Assessment of the New Jersey State Plan. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University, Center for Urban Policy Research.


Top of page

NATIONAL AWARD FOR SMART GROWTH ACHIEVEMENT WINNERS

OVERALL EXCELLENCE IN SMART GROWTH
Town of Davidson
Town of Davidson Planning Department
Davidson, North Carolina

BUILT PROJECTS
Southside Neighborhood
City of Greensboro, Department of Housing and Community Development
Greensboro, North Carolina

POLICIES AND REGULATIONS
Accessory Dwelling Unit Program
City of Santa Cruz, Department of Housing and Community Development
Santa Cruz, California

COMMUNITY OUTREACH AND EDUCATION
Sacramento Region Blueprint: Transportation/Land Use Study
Sacramento Area Council of Governments
Sacramento Region, California

SMALL COMMUNITIES
San Juan Pueblo Master Plan
San Juan Pueblo Office of the Governor
San Juan Pueblo, New Mexico

Ventura, CA. Photo courtesy of Local Government Commission.

Top of page

ABOUT THE AWARD

In 2002, EPA created the National Award for Smart Growth Achievement to recognize exceptional approaches to development that benefit the economy, public health, and the environment. The 2004 call for entries resulted in 98 applications from 32 states and the District of Columbia. Now in its third year, the National Award for Smart Growth Achievement has recognized an impressive array of projects, policies, and programs that promote healthy, vibrant communities. Each award recipient has used the principles of smart growth to create places that respect community culture and the environment, foster economic development, and enhance quality of life.

This year, a new category was added to highlight the success of small communities. With populations of less than 20,000 people, small communities provide the framework for the country’s rural fabric and are important areas of activity in many metropolitan areas. Across the country, these towns are using innovative practices to market their historic and cultural assets. They are attracting support and
financing for both redevelopment and new development. Our winners show that small communities can grow in ways that preserve the character that makes them special.

The award recipients were chosen through a multi-step process. A panel of external experts representing a broad range of constituencies with interest and expertise in the built environment and the principles of smart growth provided advice on the entries. An internal EPA review panel then provided additional comments. EPA’s Associate Administrator for Policy, Economics, and Innovation made the final award selections.

The principles of smart growth include:

  • Mix land uses.
  • Take advantage of compact building design.
  • Create housing opportunities and choices for a range of household types, family sizes and incomes.
  • Create walkable neighborhoods.
  • Foster distinctive, attractive communities with a strong sense of place.
  • Preserve open space, farmland, natural beauty, and critical environmental areas.
  • Reinvest in and strengthen existing communities and achieve more balanced regional development.
  • Provide a variety of transportation choices.
  • Make development decisions predictable, fair and cost-effective.
  • Encourage citizen and stakeholder participation in development decisions.

About the Award: Rosslyn-Ballston Corridor, Arlington, VA. Photo courtesy of Arlington County.
2003 Award winner Minneapolis-St. Paul Metropolitan Council
transformed Excelsior Boulevard (before, right) into a vibrant,
mixed use corridor (after, below), adding almost 350 housing
units and 160,000 sq. ft. of retail space.

Top of page

OVERALL EXCELLENCE IN SMART GROWTH

Town of Davidson
Town of Davidson Planning Department
Davidson, North Carolina

A small community, Davidson is setting the standard for creating healthy and vibrant neighborhoods in a historic setting. The town is revitalizing its existing buildings, and its new neighborhoods incorporate a variety of lot sizes and housing types, including affordable housing, and neighborhood parks within a five-minute walk.

For More Information:
Kris Krider
Planning Director
Town of Davidson Planning Department
Tel: 704-892-7591
kkrider@ci.davidson.nc.us

Case study photos courtesy of award winners.
These three-unit bungalows demonstrate that affordable housing can be attractive.

Case study photos courtesy of award winners.
When a national drug store chain built a new store on Main Street, the developer was required to have two stories to take advantage of the prime location. Although the new store is only two blocks from its previous location in a conventional strip center, weekly revenues have nearly doubled.

To the residents of Davidson, North Carolina, located just 20 miles from Charlotte, the essence of their small town is great neighbors and great neighborhoods. The town's high quality of life is attracting development. To preserve and enhance Davidson's character, the town adopted the Davidson Land Plan in 1995 and an innovative Planning Ordinance in 2001.

The ordinance seeks significant public involvement, a critical component for any community that wants to plan where and how it will grow. For example, the Planning Ordinance provides charrettes for every new development project. These charrettes allow the developer and the community to understand each other's goals. One developer says, "the [charrette]…forced me to come up with a new plan that was better than the original."

The town requires pedestrian, bicycle, and street circulation plans for all new development. Streets are designed to discourage cars from speeding, making it easier for Davidson's 7,800 residents to walk and bicycle around the town. To further encourage walking, the town requires narrow, tree lined streets with on-street parking and sidewalks on both sides of the street.

Recognizing that housing prices can sometimes increase when a community creates great places to live, the town requires that 12.5 percent of all new housing be affordable to families making less than the county's median family income.

Davidson's plan and ordinance have allowed the town to build on its strengths while accommodating new growth. For example, the old Davidson Cotton Mill complex has been revitalized and transformed into offices, condominiums, and a restaurant. The plan and ordinance also clearly articulate the town's vision for its growth. This, in turn, makes developers active partners in implementing the community's vision of connected, walkable neighborhoods that maintain Davidson's legacy as a traditional small town.

award photo
The Planning Ordinance aims to maintain Davidson's identity as a small town.

Top of page

BUILT PROJECTS

Southside Neighborhood
City of Greensboro, Department of Housing and Community Development
Greensboro, North Carolina

The redevelopment of the Southside neighborhood, just one-and-a-half blocks from Greensboro's historic main street, transformed a blighted area into a thriving, attractive district. The community capitalized on a rich stock of historic buildings and public spaces to restore this downtown neighborhood.

"Southside benefited from a general downtown renaissance, but also helped to give momentum to that turnaround."
Andy Scott
Director
Department of Housing and Community Development

For More Information:
Nancy Lindemeyer
Communications Manager
City of Greensboro
Tel: 336-373-4656
nancy.lindemeyer@greensboro-nc.gov

Case study photos courtesy of award winners.
Live/work units are new to Greensboro and enhance the existing businesses in the neighborhood.

Case study photos courtesy of award winners.
Southside's redevelopment transformed a blighted area within walking distance of downtown.

The Southside neighborhood, a 10-acre revitalization project, is one of Greensboro, North Carolina's first significant mixed-use, infill projects. The city's Department of Housing and Community Development developed a Traditional Neighborhood District Ordinance to assist Southside's redevelopment.

A five- to ten-minute walk from the central business district, the development includes 30 single-family homes, 10 two-family homes, 50 townhouses, 10 restored historic homes, and 20 live/work units where business owners live upstairs from their shop or office. Some residences include studio apartments above rear-detached garages, providing another housing choice.

Southside incorporates a square as the civic center of the neighborhood and features a rotating schedule of public art. The neighborhood common, used as a community park, retains a canopy of mature trees. Greensboro contributed to the revitalization effort by installing new sidewalks, historic streetlights, decorative brickwork, and landscaping.

The neighborhood is a market success. Not only did all the rehabilitated and new homes sell out, but the neighborhood generates significantly more tax revenue for the city. Before redevelopment in 1995, Southside produced $400,000 in tax revenues. When the redevelopment is complete, the total tax revenue generated from the neighborhood will be over $10 million.

A new resident captures one reason for the redevelopment's success: "Southside was the type of neighborhood we had been searching for-it provides us with the sense of community we crave within walking distance of all the services and amenities downtown has to offer. When we built our house two years ago we felt like urban pioneers, but now, with the neighborhood nearly complete, we know we made the right choice."

Success is not limited to the Southside neighborhood; redevelopment initiatives, including housing and mixed-use projects, are expanding into adjacent neighborhoods and downtown. For example, the city received a Brownfields Economic Development Initiative grant from the Department of Housing and Urban Development to redevelop an area near Southside. These successes contribute to Greensboro's downtown revival.

Case study photos courtesy of award winners.
Although the middle house is new, it blends seamlessly with the older surrounding houses.

Top of page

POLICIES AND REGULATIONS

Accessory Dwelling Unit Program
City of Santa Cruz, Department of Housing and Community Development
Santa Cruz, California

Santa Cruz is increasing and diversifying housing choices by making accessory units easier to build. This program gives homeowners an additional source of income and creates more affordable housing.

"…as my parents reached retirement age and found that they could no longer climb the stairs to the second story bedroom, they began looking for alternative ways of staying in the neighborhood….With the help of the city's revised accessory dwelling unit ordinance, the design workshops, and the ADU loan program, we are now building the 'granny unit' of my parents' dreams."
David A. Foster
Homeowner
Santa Cruz

For More Information:
Carol Berg
Housing and Community Development Manager
City of Santa Cruz, Department of Housing and Community Development
Tel: 831-420-5108
cberg@ci.santa-cruz.ca.us

Case study photos courtesy of award winners.
Accessory units are ideal for students and seniors.

Case study photos courtesy of award winners.
Santa Cruz residents demonstrate the spaciousness of their newly completed accessory unit.

Like many communities in northern California, Santa Cruz has seen its housing costs increase dramatically. These rising costs mean the city is struggling to retain teachers, police officers, and service workers. To address these challenges, Santa Cruz created an Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU) Development Program. Accessory units create separate residences by converting all or part of a garage or by building new structures on a homeowner's property.

The city's program aims to create more housing opportunities by making it easier for homeowners to build accessory units. For example, the city revised its zoning ordinance to eliminate a covered parking requirement for single-family homes, which freed up space for accessory units. In addition, the revision included design elements that ensure the accessory units complement the surrounding homes. Seven architects designed compact building prototypes (500 square feet) that address a variety of site needs. These plans have been pre-reviewed by city departments, which helps homeowners by reducing processing time, planning fees, and design costs.

The city also released an ADU "How To" manual to help residents navigate the development process. The manual packages all the information homeowners need to develop an accessory unit, including guidance on making an accessory unit "neighbor-friendly," managing a construction project, and being a good landlord. Over 175 manuals and prototype plan sets have been sold. To encourage affordable housing, homeowners get financial assistance through accessory unit loan and fee waiver programs if the unit will be rented at an affordable level.

The program has broadened the range of available housing opportunities. In 2003, the program's first full year, 35 accessory units were built, which is a significant increase over the eight units built in 2001. Over the next five years, the city estimates that between 40 and 50 new accessory units will be built per year. The program has been so successful that more than 80 cities throughout California have requested copies of the ADU manual and ordinance.

Case study photos courtesy of award winners.
Storage spaces become homes thanks to the ADU program.

Top of page

COMMUNITY OUTREACH AND EDUCATION

Sacramento Region Blueprint: Transportation/Land Use Study
Sacramento Area Council of Governments
Sacramento Region, California

The Blueprint Project brought together more than 5,000 citizens to help create and refine regional planning scenarios. The extensive public outreach was successful due in part to the collaboration of 30 agencies and private businesses. In 2003, the Blueprint Project was honored with the Governor's Environmental and Economic Leadership Award.

For More Information:
Liz Baidoo
Public Information Coordinator Sacramento Area Council of Governments
Tel: 916-340-6237
ebaidoo@sacog.org

Case study photos courtesy of award winners.
"The Blueprint Project increased public awareness of the connection between land use and transportation and the value of focusing growth in existing neighborhoods."

-Amanda Schramm, Project Director
Environmental Council of Sacramento

Case study photos courtesy of award winners.
Small group exercises at a regional workshop gave participants a more active role.

More than 5,000 community members, elected officials, and business leaders shaped the future of the Sacramento region through a series of workshops, regional conferences, web-based dialogue, and surveys. The Sacramento Area Council of Governments (SACOG) initiated this two-year process-the Sacramento Region Blueprint: Transportation/Land Use Study-to examine current land use and future growth patterns and to plan where and how the region should grow.

SACOG partnered with Valley Vision, a nonprofit organization, to develop a broad community outreach strategy that would stimulate an inclusive discussion about the region's growth. During 38 neighborhood workshops held in each jurisdiction of the region, citizens worked from a "base case" scenario, which represented future growth if current trends continued, and used maps and stickers to try out various land use changes in their communities. More than 1,500 people took part in these neighborhood workshops.

The Blueprint Project used state-of-the-art modeling tools to estimate the effects of land use patterns on transportation, air quality, and the economy. For example, participants used interactive software that immediately demonstrated the effects of their land use choices on neighborhoods, cities, counties, and the region. SACOG also launched a public education program to highlight the ways in which smart growth techniques could create more housing and transportation choices, preserve natural areas, and enhance existing communities.

The Blueprint Project staff held more than 220 special presentations to engage groups that are generally underrepresented in the transportation planning process. Translators helped conduct exercises and interpret the event for Spanish-speaking participants, and the staff distributed 50,000 multi-lingual flyers. Outreach partners included La Familia, Asian Resources, Gray Panthers, Resources for Independent Living, and local media outlets.

Results from the neighborhood workshops were compiled for a regional workshop in April 2004, where more than 1,300 participants voted on four future growth alternatives that showed different environmental and economic outcomes. The Blueprint Project changed how the Sacramento region approaches growth-it educated and engaged the public and gave them the tools to help them design the future they wanted.


Top of page

SMALL COMMUNITIES

San Juan Pueblo Master Plan
San Juan Pueblo Office of the Governor
San Juan Pueblo, New Mexico

The San Juan Pueblo found a way to honor their heritage and provide housing for their people. The tribe implemented a new urbanist Master Land Use Plan-the first of its kind for a Native American community. In 2003, a 40-unit, mixedincome, rental housing project was completed, exhibiting a culturally appropriate, affordable design.

"It's traditional living with a modern touch."
Tomasita Duran
Executive Director
Ohkay Owingeh Housing Authority

For More Information:
Tomasita Duran
Executive Director
Ohkay Owingeh Housing Authority
San Juan Pueblo
Tel: 505-852-0189

Case study photos courtesy of award winners.
The design for Tsigo Bugeh Village is inspired by traditional pueblos. The buildings are clustered around two plazas, which include cultural amenities such as "hornos," or traditional ovens (below).

Case study photos courtesy of award winners.

award photo
A traditional pueblo includes community- and pedestrian oriented villages.

The San Juan Pueblo, just north of Santa Fe, New Mexico, has been inhabited for over 700 years. In 2000, San Juan Pueblo tribal members initiated a community planning process to articulate and implement a long-term vision for the pueblo. At community design meetings, the elders recalled, "There was always an eye on you as a child and everyone felt they could count on their neighbor."

The resulting pueblo-wide Master Land Use Plan, approved in 2001, builds off these sentiments. The plan is the first smart growth model for Native American tribes. It provides a long-term growth strategy, coordinates existing infrastructure with housing and commercial development, preserves the walkable historic plazas, and encourages retail and commercial uses in a "main street" style. The plan also includes design guidelines that enhance the traditional building pattern to preserve the architectural heritage of the pueblo, fostering a distinctive sense of place.

The Tribal Planning Department, created in 2002, guides, manages, and implements the plan and improves interdepartmental coordination of infrastructure, economic development, and housing. A Community Advisory Council of neighborhood representatives advises the Planning Department's director, who encourages residents to participate in growth and development decisions within the San Juan Pueblo.

The first project implemented under the Master Land Use Plan is Tsigo Bugeh Village, which was completed in 2003. The 40-unit development mixes market-rate and affordable rental housing and includes a community center with a large kitchen, computer and exercise rooms, and laundry facilities. The project is a model of culturally appropriate, affordable design that will help the San Juan Pueblo community sustain itself for future generations. The San Juan Pueblo is an example for Native American communities everywhere; the Planning Department is sharing the lessons it learned with other tribes across the country.

Case study photos courtesy of award winners.

Top of page

CONTINUING ACHIEVEMENTS OF PAST AWARD WINNERS

Arlington County, Virginia
2002 Award Winner
Arlington County continues to bring smart growth development into the Rosslyn-Ballston corridor. In 2003, 1,117 housing units, 110,000 sq. ft. of retail space, and 330,000 sq. ft. of office space were completed. In addition, construction began on another 1,116 housing units, 110,000 sq. ft. of retail space, 1.8 million sq. ft. of office space, and 326 hotel rooms.

Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs
2002 Award Winner
The EOEA is expanding its UrbanRiver pilot project in 2005. The UrbanRiver project aims to revitalize core downtown areas of communities by using rivers as a focus for redevelopment efforts. For example, one project redeveloped former mill buildings into a vibrant commercial, service, and residential center containing 75 businesses and 32 new housing units.

City/County Association of Governments of San Mateo County, California
2002 Award Winner
San Mateo County's Transit Oriented Development Housing Incentive Program gives local jurisdictions $2,000 for each new bedroom created near transit stations. In 2004, ten projects in six cities received a total of $2.9 million to create 2,400 bedrooms in nearly 1,400 housing units, at an average density of over 60 units per acre. A third grant cycle is planned for early 2005.

Town of Breckenridge, Colorado, Planning Department
2002 Award Winner
The Wellington neighborhood continues to provide well designed, affordable, middle-income homes to over 200 people. With half the 80-acre project complete, the town of Breckenridge may soon approve another phase for 160 more homes.

Metropolitan Council, Minnesota
2003 Award Winner
Between June 2003 and July 2004, the Minneapolis- St. Paul Metropolitan Council awarded 52 grants under its Livable Communities Grants programs. The awards, totaling $16.9 million, will result in an anticipated 7,300 new and rehabilitated housing units, 6,480 new or retained jobs, and 267 acres of reclaimed polluted land, and will leverage an additional $1 billion in private and other public investments.

Photo courtesy of ICF Consulting.
Residents celebrate the grand opening of the Nicollet Commons Park in
Burnsville, Minnesota, recipient of a Livable Communities Grant. Multi-story, mixed use
buildings, including over 700 housing units, replaced vacant and underused structures
on a 40-acre site.

Department of the Navy
2003 Award Winner
The Navy has used smart growth principles to redevelop 144 acres into The Village at Serra Mesa, in San Diego, California. The Village replaces 812 aging military houses with 900 new affordable housing units, a community center, recreational space, a new daycare facility, and a Navy Exchange as a corner grocery store.

Georgia Office of Quality Growth
2003 Award Winner
The Georgia Quality Growth program has enhanced its outreach by providing new tools, such as a quality growth audit and a visual preference survey. The survey-a series of photographs depicting various design elements such as housing placement, store fronts, and pedestrian areas-helps communities envision and select from competing development options.

Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Treasurer's Office
2003 Award Winner
In 2004, the Treasurer's Office has made more than 430 new housing enhancement loans exceeding $4.8 million. These loans are designed to increase housing and preserve historic homes. In addition, the Treasurer's Office has worked with Hamilton, Lorain, Medina, and Summit Counties in Ohio to assist them in designing loan programs based on the Cuyahoga County model.

Photo courtesy of ICF Consulting.
This historic house is one of over 100 in Cuyahoga County restored
using the Heritage Home Program.

City of Raleigh and Wake County, North Carolina, Public School System
2003 Award Winner
The city of Raleigh has continued to coordinate with the Wake County Public School System to purchase 20 acres of land for a shared elementary school, community center, and park facility in the Brier Creek Village. The school and community center will provide a civic element in the Brier Creek Village. The facilities were designed to encourage walking between them and other neighborhood amenities. The school is scheduled to open in August 2006.

Top of page

SMART GROWTH TRENDS AND OPPORTUNITIES

Smart Growth Trends...

  • According to Emerging Trends in Real Estate 2004, infill redevelopment is a high priority investment strategy for developers.1
  • Since 1980, every dollar a community has spent on revitalizing its Main Street and downtown business districts has leveraged over $40 of additional investment.2
  • Thirty-seven of the nation's 40 largest metropolitan areas are currently constructing new rail lines, rail extensions, and busways.

Streetcar in Portland, OR. Photo courtesy of Liisa Ecola.
Responding to consumer demand, developers are incorporating more amenities and conveniences, such as grocery stores, into their mixed-use projects.

The developer of this new community was allowed to build
at higher densities in order to preserve open space,
such as this riverbank buffer area.
Newbury Street, Boston, MA. Photo courtesy of Liisa Ecola.

...and Opportunities
  • AARP reports that 71 percent of older households want to live within walking distance of transit.4
  • Bank of America has expanded its commitment to smart growth projects, dedicating $350 billion to community development over a 10-year period.5
  • Studies of consumer preferences suggest that over 14 million new households will want to locate within a half-mile of a transit station by 2025.6

1 Urban Land Institute and PriceWaterhouseCoopers. 2004. Emerging Trends in Real Estate.
2 National Main Street Center. 2002. National Reinvestment Statistics, "Reinvestment Ratio." Accessed October 8, 2004 from http://www.preservationnation.org/main-street/ Link to EPA's External Link Disclaimer.
3 Center for Transit-Oriented Development. 2004. Hidden in Plain Sight: Capturing the Demand for Housing Near Transit.
4 Ibid.
5 National Association of Local Government Environmental Professionals and Smart Growth Leadership Institute. 2004.
Smart Growth Is Smart Business.
6 Center for Transit-Oriented Development, op. cit.

Top of page

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Review Panel

Robert Brosnan, Arlington County, Virginia
Steve Gallagher, National Association of Industrial and Office Properties
Jane King, AARP
Bob McNamara, National Association of REALTORS®
Toby Millman, Abdo Development
Jim Murray, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Arthur C. Nelson, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Harrison Rue, Thomas Jefferson Planning District Commission & Charlottesville-Albemarle Metropolitan Planning Organization
Julia Seward, Local Initiatives Support Corporation
Scot Spencer, The Annie E. Casey Foundation
Edward Tombari, National Association of Home Builders

National Building MuseumLink to EPA's External Link Disclaimer

The 2004 National Award for Smart Growth Achievement ceremony was held at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC, on November 17. The National Building Museum, created by an act of Congress in 1980, is America's premier cultural institution dedicated to exploring and celebrating architecture, design, engineering, construction, and urban planning. Since opening its doors in 1985, the museum has become a vital forum for exchanging ideas and information about such topical issues as managing suburban growth, preserving landmarks and communities, and revitalizing urban centers. Its engaging exhibitions and education programs, including innovative curricula for school children and stimulating programs for adults, annually attract nearly 400,000 people, making the museum the most-visited institution of its kind in the world.

Photos

Front cover: Skaneateles, NY. Photo courtesy of Sabra Richards. Environmental Protection and Smart Growth: Skaneateles, NY. Photo courtesy of Lynn Richards.
Winners page: Englewood, NJ. Photo courtesy of National Trust for Historic Preservation.
About the Award: Excelsior Boulevard, St. Louis Park, MN. Photo courtesy of the Metropolitan Council.
Case study photos courtesy of award winners. Sacramento workshop photo courtesy of Leon Fredette/Fredette Photography.
Past Winners, left: Burnsville, MN. Photo courtesy of the Metropolitan Council.
Past Winners, right: Cleveland, OH. Photo courtesy of Sara W. Hobbs,
Cleveland Restoration Society.
Smart Growth Trends...: Montgomery County, MD. Photo courtesy of U.S. EPA,
Development, Community, and Environment Division.
...and Opportunities: Portland, OR. Photo courtesy of U.S. EPA, Development,
Community, and Environment Division.

Top of page

Smart Growth Home | Contact Us


Local Navigation


Jump to main content.