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SNAP Regulations

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program implements section 612 of the amended Clean Air Act of 1990, which requires EPA’s continuous review of alternatives to find those that pose less overall risk to human health and the environment. Through these evaluations, SNAP generates lists of acceptable and unacceptable substitutes for each of the major industrial use sectors. The intended effect of the SNAP program is to promote a smooth transition to safer alternatives.

A chronological listing of all SNAP rules and notices is also available.

You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader, available as a free download, to view some of the files on this page. See EPA's PDF page to learn more about PDF, and for a link to the free Acrobat Reader.

Rules

The following rules list substitutes that have been determined unacceptable, acceptable subject to use conditions, and acceptable subject to narrowed use limits.

Substitutes that are acceptable without restriction are listed below in Notices of Acceptability

Rule 20- Prohibition on the use of certain high-GWP HFCs as alternatives  

Effective Date: August 19, 2015

In support of President Obama’s Climate Action, under this final rule, various hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and HFC-containing blends that were previously listed as acceptable alternatives under the SNAP program are now listed as unacceptable for specific uses. This rule is part of the SNAP program’s continuous review of alternatives to find those that pose less overall risk to human health and the environment. Specifically, this action changes the listing status for certain HFCs in various end-uses in the aerosols, refrigeration and air conditioning, and foam blowing sectors. This action also changes the status from acceptable to unacceptable for certain hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) being phased out of production under the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer and section 605(a) of the Clean Air Act, where substitutes are available that pose overall lower risk to human health and/or the environment.

To view the public docket, visit www.regulations.gov and search for docket number EPA-HQ-OAR-2014-0198.

Final Rule - (July 20, 2015) (PDF 91 pp, 807 KB)
Fact Sheet (PDF 6pp, 402 KB)
Proposed Rule - (August 6, 2014; 79 FR 46126) (PDF 42pp, 541 KB)
Fact Sheet (PDF 3p, 20 KB)
Notice to Extend Comment Period (September 19, 2014; 79 FR 56331) (PDF 3pp, 246 KB)

Note: The tables listing the substitutes for refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing agents, and aerosols on other webpages will be updated soon to reflect this action.

Rule 19- Climate-friendly Refrigerant Alternatives

Consistent with President Obama’s Climate Action Plan, EPA is providing additional options for refrigerants in the United States that offer better climate protection without harming the ozone layer. EPA is listing certain climate-friendly hydrocarbons (ethane, isobutane, and propane) and a hydrocarbon blend (R-441A) as acceptable in stand-alone commercial and household refrigerators and freezers, very low temperature refrigeration, non-mechanical heat transfer, vending machines, and room air conditioning units. EPA is also listing HFC-32 as acceptable in room air conditioning units. HFC-32 has one-third the GWP of the conventional refrigerants currently being used in room air conditioning units. Through this rulemaking, EPA is also e xempting ethane, isobutane, propane, and R-441A from the §608 venting prohibition for the specific applications listed above.

Final Rule (April 10, 2015)
    PDF Version (PDF 49 pp, 890 KB)
    Fact Sheet (PDF 2 pp, 15 KB)
          Proposed Rule (July 9, 2014)
               Print Version (PDF 30pp, 419 KB)
               HTML Version (30pp, 248 KB)
               Fact Sheet (PDF 1p, 96 KB)         

Rule 18- Fire Suppression Alternatives

Final Rule for Fire Suppression Alternative 
Effective Date: May 29, 2013

This rule lists C7 Fluoroketone as acceptable subject to narrowed use limits as a halon substitute for the streaming end-use. in the fire suppression and explosion protection sector.  PDF Version (7 pp, 308 KB) HTML Version (7 p,  48 KB)

Withdrawal in Part of Direct Final Rule
Effective Date: December 14, 2012

This notice withdraws C7 Fluoroketone from the direct final rule issued September 19, 2012. The listing of two other substitutes, Powdered Aerosols F (KSA) and Powdered Aerosol G (Dry Sprinkler Powdered Aerosol (DSPA) Fixed Generators),  in that direct final rule remain in effect.  PDF Version (1 p, 197 KB) HTML Version (1 p, 5 KB)

Direct Final Rule
Effective Date: December 18, 2012 for Powdered Aerosols F and G

This rule lists three halon substitutes in the fire suppression and explosion protection sector. Powdered Aerosol F and G are acceptable subject to use conditions in total flooding. C7 Fluoroketone is acceptable subject to narrowed use limits for the streaming end-use.

Direct Final Rule: PDF Version (11 pp, 300 KB)
Concurrent Proposal: PDF Version (4 pp, 204 KB)
Fact Sheet

Additional information: DSPA generators produce combustion byproducts (micron-sized dry particles and a gaseous mixture), that mix together into a uniform fire-extinguishing aerosol before being released into the protected area.  The propellant components of the system generates inert gases, which function to physically extinguish the fire by the combined effects of straining the burning flame front and reducing the heat of the combustion sources.  The small aerosol particles have a high surface area­to-volume ratio, which increases their ability to rapidly distribute throughout enclosed areas and to act as heat sinks. 

Rule 17- Listing of hydrocarbon refrigerants as substitutes for household refrigerators and freezers and retail food refrigeration
Effective Date: February 21, 2012

Final Rule (December 20, 2011; 76 FR 78832 )
HTML Version and Print Version (27 pp, 298 KB)
Fact Sheet     
Proposed Rule (May 10, 2010; 75 FR 25799)
HTML Version and Print Version (17 pp, 278 KB)
Fact Sheet

Rule 16- HFO-1234yf as a new substitute for motor vehicle air conditioning
Effective Date: May 21, 2012

Direct Final Amendment to Rule 16—Revised fitting for refrigerant containers of HFO-1234yf    Effective Date: May 21, 2012

Direct Final/Concurrent Proposal
Direct Final Rule: HTML Version and PDF Version (8 pp, 261 KB) (March 26, 2012; 77 FR 17344)
Concurrent Proposal: HTML Version and PDF Version (3 pp, 200 KB) (March 23; 77 FR 16988)
Fact Sheet

Effective Date:  May 31, 2011

Final Rule (March 29, 2011; 76 FR 17488)
HTML Version and Print Version (34 pp, 366 KB)
Fact Sheet
Proposed Rule (October 19, 2009; 74 FR 53445)
HTML Version and Print Version (10 pp, 86 KB)

Rule 15- Fire suppression and explosion protection listing under SNAP
Effective Date: November 27, 2006

Direct Final/Concurrent Proposal (September 21, 2006; 71 FR 56539 / 71 FR 56422)
Direct Final Rule: HTML Version and Print Version (11 pp, 195 KB)
Concurrent Proposal: HTML Version and Print Version (3 pp, 200 KB)
Fact Sheet

Rule 14- Alternatives for the motor vehicle air conditioning sector
Effective Date: August 6, 2012

This rule lists R-744 (CO2) as an acceptable alternative with use conditions for motor vehicle air conditioning systems.

Final Rule (June 6, 2012;  77 FR 33315
HTML version and Print Version (16 pp, 345 KB)
Fact Sheet

This rule lists HFC-152a as an acceptable alternative with use conditions for motor vehicle air conditioning systems.

Final Rule (June 12, 2008; 73 FR 33304)
HTML Version and Print Version (8 pp, 137 KB)
Fact Sheet
Proposed Rule (September 14, 2006; 71 FR 55140)
HTML Version and Print Version (10 pp, 194 KB)
Fact Sheet

 

Data Availability Notice (September 17, 2009; 74 FR 47774)
HTML Version and Print Version (2 pp, 48 KB)
This Data Availability Notice provides more information about, and seeks comment on, the short-term health effects of CO2 in confined spaces and potential use limitations as an automotive refrigerant.

Rule 13- The use of HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b in foams / listing of ozone depleting substitutes in foam blowing
Effective Date: May 29, 2007

Final Rule (March 28, 2007; 72 FR 14432)
HTML Version and Print Version (12 pp, 198 KB)
Fact Sheet
Proposed Rule (November 4, 2005; 70 FR 67120)
HTML Version and Print Version

Rule 12- n-propyl bromide(nPB) in solvents cleaning, aerosols, and adhesives as a substitute for CFC-113, methyl chloroform, and HCFC-141b

Questions and answers about the May 2007 proposed and final rules

Proposed Rule for Adhesives, Coatings, and Aerosols (May 30, 2007; 72 FR 30168)
Print Version (40 pp, 1.52 MB)
Fact Sheet
Final Rule for Solvent Cleaning (May 30, 2007; 72 FR 30142)
Print Version (27 pp, 451 kb)
Fact Sheet

The May 2007 final rule for nPB in solvent cleaning finds nPB an acceptable substitute for ozone depleting substances in metals, electronics, and precision cleaning.
Corrections to Proposed Rule (October 2, 2003; 68 FR 56809)
Proposed Rule (June 3, 2003; 68 FR 33284)
Corrections to the Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (March 25, 1999; 64 FR 14417)
Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (February 18, 1999; 64 FR 8043)

The June 3, 2003, rule proposed to list n-propyl bromide (nPB) as an acceptable substitute for ozone depleting substances (ODSs), subject to use conditions, in the solvent cleaning sector as well as aerosol solvents and adhesive uses. EPA initially proposed that the use of nPB is acceptable subject to a use condition, limiting contaminants of nPB formulations from isopropyl bromide.

Rule 11- Fire suppression substitutes
Effective Date: March 28, 2003

Correction to Final Rule, Typographical Errors (April 7, 2003; 68 FR 16749)
Correction to Final Rule, Additional Information (April 7, 2003; 68 FR 16729)
Final Rule (January 27, 2003; 68 FR 4004)

EPA is issuing its decision on the acceptability of three halon substitutes in the fire suppression and explosion protection sector. HFC227BC found acceptable subject to use conditions in total flooding. C6-perfluoroketone and H Golden HFPEs found acceptable subject to narrowed use limits for the streaming end-use.

Rule 10- Acceptable and unacceptable substitutes for ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) in foams blowing
Effective Date: September 30, 2004

Final Rule (September 30, 2004; 69 FR 58269)
Notice of Data Availability (March 10, 2004; 69 FR 11358)

This action finds HCFC-141b unacceptable for use as a substitute for ODSs in all end uses in the foam blowing sector, except for specified exemptions, including use in space vehicles, nuclear energy, defense, and research and development for foreign customers.
Effective Date: August 21, 2002

Final Rule (July 22, 2002; 67 FR 47703)
Notice of Data Availability (May 23, 2001; 66 FR 28408)
Proposed Rule (July 11, 2000; 65 FR 42653)

This action lists acceptable and unacceptable substitutes for ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) in the foam-blowing sector. The final rule withdraws the proposed decision to list HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b as unacceptable substitutes for existing users; lists HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b as unacceptable substitutes for HCFC-141b in rigid polyurethane/ polyisocyanurate laminated boardstock, rigid polyurethane appliance foam, and rigid polyurethane spray foam applications; lists HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b as acceptable substitutes for HCFC-141b, with narrowed use limits (users must ascertain and document that other acceptable alternatives are not technically feasible) in commercial refrigeration and sandwich panel applications and in the rigid polyurethane slabstock and other foams end-use; and lists HCFC-124 as an unacceptable substitute in all foam end-uses. At this time, EPA is deferring final action on its proposed decision to list HCFC-141b as an unacceptable foam-blowing agent.

Rule 9- Removal of restrictions on certain fire suppression substitutes for ozone-depleting substances (ODSs), and a list of substitutes
Effective Date: April 1, 2002

Final Rule (January 29, 2002; 67 FR 4185)

EPA is rescinding use conditions that limit human exposure to halocarbon and inert gas agents used in the fire suppression and explosion protection industry. These use conditions are redundant with safety standards established by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). In addition, EPA is taking direct final action to change the listing for HBFC-22B1 from acceptable subject to use conditions to unacceptable.

Rule 8- Prohibition for the use of refrigerant blends containing hexafluoropropylene
Effective Date: January 26, 1999

Interim Final Rule Prohibiting the Use of Refrigerant Blends Containing Hexafluoropropylene (January 26, 1999; 64 FR 3865)

Hexafluoropropylene (HFP) and any blend containing HFP are listed as unacceptable for substitutes for CFC-12 and HCFC-22.

Rule 7- MT-31 as an unacceptable refrigerant under EPA's Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) Program
Effective Date: January 26, 1999

Interim Final Rule Prohibiting the use of MT-31 (January 26, 1999; 64 FR 3861)

The refrigerant blend MT-31 is listed as unacceptable for all refrigeration and air-conditioning end-uses.

Rule 6- Listing of two substitutes for ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) in the fire suppression and explosion protection sector
Effective Date: May 26, 2000

Final Rule (April 26, 2000; 65 FR 24387)
Corrections to Proposed Rule (March 25, 1999; 64 FR 14417)
Proposed Rule (February 18, 1999; 64 FR 8038)

This action lists two substitutes for halon B1301 and halon 1211, IG-100,and HCFC Blend E in the fire suppression and explosion protection sector as acceptable, subject to use restrictions. Substitute IG-100 is for the end-use of total flooding systems and HCFC Blend E is for the end-use of streaming agents.

Rule 5- Two gases found unacceptable as substitutes for refrigerants in "self-chilling cans"
Effective Date: April 2, 1999

Final Rule (March 3, 1999; 64 FR 10373)
Proposed Rule (February 3, 1998; 63 FR 5491)

The action of this rule, lists unacceptable the use of HFC-134a and HFC-152a as refrigerants in "self-chilling cans."

Rule 4- Listing of motor vehicle air-conditioning systems substitutes and a range of certain other substitutes
Effective Date: May 28, 1999

Final Rule (April 28, 1999; 64 FR 22981)
Proposed Rule (May 21, 1997; 62 FR 27873)

This action clarifies the criteria for unique fittings used in motor vehicle air-conditioning systems, and addresses the acceptability of HFC-4310mee and HCFC-225ca/cb. The end-uses for these substitutes are in metal cleaning and solvent in aerosols. C3F8, HFC-236fa, and C4F10 are found acceptable with use conditions for halon 1301 in-fire suppression and explosion prevention. The unacceptability of substitutes in the refrigeration and air conditioning, solvents, aerosols, fire suppression, and adhesives, coatings, & inks sectors are also listed.

Rule 3- Cross-media evaluation of risks to human health and environment by sector end-use
Effective Date: November 15, 1996

Final Rule (October 16, 1996; 61 FR 54029)
Proposed Rule (May 22, 1996; 61 FR 25604)

EPA issued its decisions on the acceptability HFC-4310mee, HCFC-141b, perfluoropolyethers, and perfluorocarbons. The end-uses of these substitutes are electronic and precision cleaning as well as aerosol solvents.

Rule 2- Cross-media evaluation of risks to human health and environment by sector
Effective Date: June 21, 1996

Final Rule (May 22, 1996; 61 FR 25585)
Proposed Rule (October 2, 1995; 60 FR 51383)

EPA is issuing its preliminary decisions on the acceptability of substitutes not previously reviewed by the Agency. Monochlorotoluenes/benzotrifluorides are acceptable subject to use conditions as substitutes for CFC-113 and MCF in electronics, precision, and metals cleaning. Blend Zeta and HCFC Blend Delta are acceptable as substitutes for CFC-12 in retrofitted and new motor vehicle air conditioners, subject to the use conditions applicable to motor vehicle air conditioning.

Rule 1- Comment response document of public options concerning EPA rulemaking
Effective Date: July 13, 1995

Final Rule (June 13, 1995; 60 FR 31092)
Proposed Rule (September 26, 1994; 59 FR 49108)

EPA issued decisions on refrigerants and solvent cleaning sectors found acceptable subject to use conditions. The refrigeration sector deals with end-uses both retrofit and new equipment. HCFC Blend Beta was found as acceptable subject to use conditions for motor vehicle air conditioning. Blend B was found acceptable subject to use conditions for; centrifugal chillers, chillers, industrial process refrigeration, skating rinks, storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, food refrigeration, ice machines, freezers, dehumidifiers, and air conditioners. HCFC-225 ca/cb is decided as a substitute for CFC-113 and MCF acceptable to use conditions in precision and metals cleaning. Various other substitutes were found unacceptable for refrigerants and air conditioning as well as in the solvents cleaning sector.

SNAP Notices of Acceptability

These notices expand the list of acceptable or pending substitutes for ozone depleting substances (ODSs) under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program. The substitutes listed below are acceptable without restriction in the specific end-uses unless designated as pending. A pending substitute can be sold after the 90 day review period has expired, but its acceptability may be affected by a subsequent rulemaking. To see substitutes that are restricted or prohibited, see the list of rules above.

Notice 30:
Effective Date: July 16, 2015

Acceptability Determination 30 (July 16, 2015; 80 FR 42053)

HTML Format
PDF (Adobe Acrobat) File (14 pp., 354 K)

Consistent with President Obama’s Climate Action Plan, EPA is adding options for refrigeration and air conditioning; foam blowing; solvent cleaning; aerosols; and adhesives, coatings, and inks that offer better climate protection without harming the ozone layer. The Determination of Acceptability expands the SNAP program’s list of acceptable substitutes by adding a number of substitutes with lower GWPs compared to what are predominately used today for the same uses. New substitutes are: 

  • R-450A in new vending machines;
  • R-448A, R-513A, and R-449A in several refrigeration and air conditioning end-uses;
  •  Methoxytridecafluoroheptene isomers in non-mechanical heat transfer, three solvent cleaning end-uses, aerosol solvents; and adhesives and coatings; and
  • Hydrofluoroolefin (HFO)-1336mzz(Z) for high-pressure two-part spray foam.
Note: The tables listing the substitutes for refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing agents, aerosols, solvents, and adhesives, coatings and inks on other webpages will be updated soon to include the end-uses and substitutes listed in this action.  

To review the public docket for this notice, visit www.regulations.gov and search for docket number EPA-HQ-OAR-2003-0118.
 

Notice 29:
Effective Date: October 21, 2014

Acceptability Determination 29 (October 21, 2014; 79 FR 62863)

HTML Format
PDF (Adobe Acrobat) File (8 pp., 283 K)

Consistent with President Obama’s Climate Action Plan, EPA is increasing the options for refrigerants, foam blowing agents, and fire suppressants that offer better climate protection without harming the ozone layer. On October 15, 2014, a Notice of Acceptability was signed expanding the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program’s list of acceptable substitutes by adding a number of substitutes with lower global warming potentials (GWPs) compared to what are predominately used today for the same uses. This action also builds on the announcements made on September 16th concerning new private sector commitments to reduce emissions of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs).  

The notice lists the following as acceptable:

  • trans-1-chloro-3,3,3-trifluoroprop-1-ene in non-mechanical heat transfer, and in flexible polyurethane foams
  • CO2 in refrigerated transport
  • R-450A in a variety of refrigeration and air conditioning end-uses
  • Methylal in a variety of foam blowing end-uses
  • Hydrofluoroolefin (HFO)-1336mzz(Z) in a variety of foam blowing end-uses
  • Powdered Aerosol D in the total flooding end-use
Note: The tables listing the substitutes for refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing agents, and fire suppression and explosion protection will be updated soon to include the end-uses and substitutes listed in this action. 

To review the public docket for this notice, visit www.regulations.gov and search for docket number EPA-HQ-OAR-2003-0118.
    

Notice 28:
Effective Date: May 17, 2013

Acceptability Determination 28 (May 17, 2013; 78 FR 29034)

HTML Format
PDF (Adobe Acrobat) File (8 pp., 283 K)

This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in the refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, solvent cleaning, aerosol and fire suppression sectors. The determinations concern new substitutes. 

  • Erratum: In section B.1, the text incorrectly identifies HFC-365mfc as 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoropropane with Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CASRN) 138495-42-8. The correct name is 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluorobutane and the correct CASRN is 406-58-6.

Notice 27:
Effective Date: August 10, 2012

Acceptability Determination 27 (August 10, 2012; 77 FR 47768 )

PDF (Adobe Acrobat) File (12 pp., 320 K)

This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in the refrigeration and air conditioning; foam blowing; solvent cleaning; adhesives, coatings and inks; and fire suppression sectors. The determinations concern new substitutes. 

 

Notice 26:
Effective Date: October 4, 2011

This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, solvent cleaning and fire suppression. The determinations concern new substitutes.

Acceptability Determination 26 (Oct. 4, 2011; 76 FR 61269)  

Notice 25:
Effective Date: June 16, 2010

Notice 25 (June 16, 2010; 75 FR 34017)

This notice lists acceptable substitutes for HCFC-22, HCFC-142b, and blends thereof for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, aerosols, and sterilants. The determinations all include substitutes previously listed as substitutes for other ODS or as substitutes for HCFC-22 alone.

Notice 24:
Effective Date: September 30, 2009

Notice 24 (September 30, 2009; 74 FR 50129)

This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning and foam blowing. The determinations concern new substitutes. In addition, this document informs the public that the refrigerant blend previously found acceptable under the name KDD5 has received the ASHRAE designation R-438A and has the trade name ISCEON® MO99.

Notice 23:
Effective Date: January 2, 2009

Notice 23 (January 2, 2009; 74 FR 21)

This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, fire suppression, and foam blowing. The determinations concern new substitutes.

Notice 22:
Effective Date: October 4, 2007

Notice 22 (October 4, 2007; 72 FR 56628)

This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning. The determinations concern new substitutes.

Notice 21:
Effective Date: September 28, 2006

Notice 21 (September 28, 2006; 71 FR 56884)

This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, cleaning solvents, aerosols, and sterilants. The determinations concern new substitutes.

Notice 20:
Effective Date: March 29, 2006

Notice 20 (March 29, 2006; 71 FR 15589)

This notice expands the list of acceptable substitutes for end uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, and fire suppression and explosion protection. The determinations concern new substitutes.

Notice 19:
Effective Date: October 1, 2004

Notice 19 (October 1, 2004; 69 FR 58903)

EPA has found acceptable additional substitutes for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, fire suppression and explosion protection, and sterilants. This document also clarifies the status of the use of a hydrochlorofluorocarbon as an aerosol solvent, revises the global warming potential for a substitute previously listed as acceptable for use in fire suppression and explosion protection based on new information, and clarifies a statement from the previous SNAP notice of acceptability of August 21, 2003, regarding a refrigerant.

Notice 18:
Effective Date: August 21, 2003

Notice 18 (August 21, 2003; 68 FR 50533)

The EPA has approved acceptable substitutes for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning, solvents cleaning, foam blowing, fire suppression and explosion protection, and aerosols.

  • Refrigeration and air-conditioning sector EPA has found acceptable RS-44 as a substitute for HCFC-22 and R-407C as a substitute for R-502 in the following end-uses (new and retro-fit); industrial process refrigeration, industrial process air conditioning, ice skating rinks, cold storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, retail food refrigeration, vending machines, water coolers, commercial ice machines, household refrigerators and freezers, centrifugal chillers, reciprocating chillers, screw chillers, non-mechanical heat transfer systems, household and light commercial air conditioning, as well as residential dehumidifiers. Also, EPA decided ISCEON 89 as an acceptable substitute for R-13B1 in very low temperature refrigeration.
  • EPA has decided acceptable for the solvent cleaning sector HFE-7000 as a substitute for CFC-113, methyl chloroform, and HCFC-141b in the end-uses of precision cleaning and electronics cleaning.
  • The foam blowing sector EPA decided acceptable Ecomate as a substitute for CFC and HCFCs, HCF-245fa as a substitute for HCFCs and blends of HFC-245fa and HCFC-22 as a substitute for blends of HCFC-141b and HCFC-22 in the following end-uses; rigid polyurethane and polyisocyanurate laminated boardstock, rigid polyurethane appliance foam, rigid polyurethane slabstock and other foams, rigid polyurethane commercial refrigeration and sandwich panels, polyurethane integral skin foam, phenolic insulation board and bunstock, and polyolefin.
  • EPA has decided for the fire suppression and explosion protection sectors NAF S-125 as an acceptable substitute for halon 1301 in the end-use of total flooding.
  • In the aerosol sector, HFE-7000 is an acceptable substitute for CFC-113, methyl chloroform, HCFC-141b in the end-use of aerosol solvents.

Notice 17:
Effective Date: December 20, 2002

Correction to Notice 17 (April 7, 2003; 68 FR 16728)
Notice 17 (December 20, 2002; 67 FR 77927)

The EPA has approved acceptable substitutes for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning, solvents cleaning, fire suppression and explosion protection, and aerosols.

  • EPA's decision for acceptable substitutes in refrigeration and air conditioning are RS-24 as a substitute for CFC-12, NU-22 as a substitute for R-502, and R-404A, R-507A, R-407C as substitutes for HCFC-22 and HCFC blends. The end-uses for these substitutes are; industrial process refrigeration, industrial process air conditioning (only new), ice skating rinks, cold storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, retail food refrigeration, vending machines, water coolers, commercial ice machines, household refrigerators and freezers, reciprocating chillers, centrifugal chillers, screw chillers, very low temperature refrigeration, non-mechanical heat transfer systems, household and light commercial air conditioning, residential dehumidifiers.
  • EPA's decision for the solvent cleaning sector of HCFC-225ca and HCFC-225cb as acceptable substitutes for CFC-113 and methyl chloroform for metal cleaning.
  • EPA's decision for the fire suppression and explosion protection sector of C6-perfluoroketone as an acceptable substitute for halon 1301.
  • EPA's decision for the aerosol sector of HCFC-225ca and HCFC-225cb as acceptable substitutes for HCFC-141b in the end-use of aerosol solvents.

Notice 16:
Effective Date: March 22, 2002

Notice 16 (March 22, 2002; 76 FR 13272)

The ozone depleting substitutes are for use in the following sectors: refrigeration and air conditioning; aerosols; and adhesives, coatings, and inks. In addition, we are notifying the public of new information available on the toxicity of HCFC-225ca and HCFC-225cb, acceptable substitutes used in solvents cleaning.

Notice 15:
Effective Date: May 23, 2001

Notice 15 (May 23, 2001; 66 FR 28179)

EPA's decision for acceptable substitute uses in the refrigeration and air conditioning sector.

  • HFC-134a/HBr (98/8) as a substitute for CFC-12 and R-502, with the end uses of retail food refrigeration and cold storage warehouses for primary heat transfer fluid in new secondary-loop equipment for not-in-kind replacements of systems and the end-use of refrigerated transport.
  • HFC-134a/HBr (92/8) as an acceptable substitutes for CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-114, CFC-115, and R-507 in the end-use of industrial process refrigeration.
  • PFC-330ST, PFC-550HC, PFC-660HC, PFC-1100HC, PFC-1100LT, PGC-100, PGC-150, PFC-331ST, PFC-551HC, PFC-661HC, PFC-1101HC, and PGC-151 as acceptable substitutes for CFC- 13, CFC-113, CFC-114, and blends thereof for the end-use of very low temperature refrigeration (new and retrofit).

Notice 14:
Effective Date: December 18, 2000

Correction to Notice 14 (March 7, 2001; 66 FR 13655)
Notice 14 (December 18, 2000; 65 FR 78977)

This notice identifies EPA's decisions of acceptable substitutes for refrigeration, air conditioning, foams, non-aerosol solvent cleaning, and aerosol solvents. This action also requests information on the composition and safety of certain refrigerants for motor vehicle air conditioners. This notice also requests information on whether the SNAP program should include review of and establishment of use conditions for operations that involve manual cleaning with solvents or restriction of non-aerosol solvent substitutes to equipment that meets the cleaning equipment standards in the National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning. Finally, this action updates readers on the SNAP program's review of n-propyl bromide for use as a substitute for ozone-depleting solvents used in the non-aerosol solvents cleaning, aerosol solvents and propellants, and adhesives, coatings and inks sectors.

  • Hydrofluoroether 7100 and Hydrofluoroether 7200 for CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-114, CFC-115, HCFC-22, R-502, R-503, and R-13B1 in the refrigeration and air-conditioning end-uses of industrial process refrigeration, retail food refrigeration, and very low temperature refrigeration, as a secondary heat transfer fluid in new equipment for not-in-kind replacements of systems. Also, non-mechanical heat transfer for use in retrofit and new equipment.
  • FOR12A and FOR12B for an acceptable substitute of HCFC-22 and CFC-12, NU-22 for an acceptable substitute of HCFC-22, and SP34E for an acceptable substitute of CFC-12 for the refrigeration and air-conditioning end-uses; industrial process refrigeration and air-conditioning, industrial process refrigeration, cold storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, retail food refrigeration, ice machines, vending machines, water coolers, centrifugal chillers, reciprocating chillers, household refrigerators and freezers, residential air conditioning and heat pumps, residential dehumidifiers, motor vehicle air conditioning and buses only.
  • Methyl formate as an acceptable substitute for CFCs and HCFCs in the following foam sector end-uses; rigid polyurethane and polyisocyanurate laminated boardstock, rigid polyurethane appliances, rigid polyurethane slabstock and other foams, rigid polyurethane commercial refrigeration and sandwich panels, and polyurethane integral skin foam.
  • Hydrofluoroether 7100 as an acceptable substitute for HCFC-141b and HCFC-22; Heptafluorocyclopentane as acceptable substitutes for CFC-113, methyl chloroform, and HCFC-141b; and HFC-365mfc as an acceptable substitute for CFC-113, methyl chloroform, and HCFC-141b in the non-aerosol solvent cleaning end-uses of all metals cleaning, precision cleaning, and electronics cleaning applications.

Notice 13:
Effective Date: June 19, 2000

Notice 13 (June 19, 2000; 65 FR 37900)

There are listing of substitutes for refrigeration and air conditioning as well as foam blowing.

  • The refrigeration and air conditioning acceptable substitutes are HFC-4310mee for CFCs and HCFCs, Ikon A and Ikon B for CFC-12, and HFC-245fa for CFC-11 (new only). These substitutes are for the following end uses: non-mechanical heat transfer, household refrigeration and freezers, commercial comfort air conditioning, cold storage warehouses, industrial process refrigerators and air conditioners, refrigerated transport, retail food refrigeration, vending machines, water coolers, commercial ice machines, and small auxiliary power units.
  • Vacuum panels are acceptable as substitutes for HCFC blown rigid polyurethane appliance foam, and 2-chloropropane is acceptable for HCFCs in rigid polyurethane and polyisocyanurate laminated boardstock foam.

Notice 12:
Effective Date: April 11, 2000

Notice 12 (April 11, 2000; 65 FR 19327)

This notice deals with acceptable substitutes for refrigeration, air conditioning, and foam blowing. The end uses for refrigeration and air-conditioning are uranium isotope separation processing (retrofit), using furan as an acceptable substitute for CFC-114. All foam-blowing end uses are included, for saturated light hydrocarbons C3-C6 for HCFC-141b, except HCFC-141b replacement in spray foam applications.

Notice 11:
Effective Date: December 6, 1999

Notice 11 (December 6, 1999; 64 FR 68039)

This notice applies to substitutes for refrigeration, air conditioning, foam blowing, solvents cleaning sector, and aerosols.

  • HFC-245fa is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-11 and HCFC-141b in all foam end-uses.
  • Exxsol Blowing Agents are acceptable substitutes for HCFC-141b in all foam end-uses.
  • Hydrofluoroether (HFE-7200) is an acceptable substitute for CFC-113 and methyl chloroform (MCF) in all solvents cleaning end-uses and solvents in aerosol products.
  • THR-02 is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-12 in the following end-uses: Industrial process refrigeration and air-conditioning, cold storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, retail food refrigeration, ice machines, vending machines, water coolers, centrifugal chillers, reciprocating chillers, household refrigerators and freezers.
  • THR-03 is acceptable as a substitute for HCFC- 22 in the following end-uses: Industrial process refrigeration and air-conditioning, cold storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, retail food refrigeration, ice machines, centrifugal chillers, reciprocating chillers, ice skating rinks, household refrigerators and freezers, and residential window unit air-conditioning.
  • ISCEON 59 is acceptable as a substitute for R- 22 in the following end-uses: Household and light commercial air-conditioning, commercial comfort air-conditioning, industrial process refrigeration and air-conditioning, cold storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, retail food refrigeration, ice machines, vending machines, water coolers, centrifugal chillers, reciprocating chillers, household and other refrigerated appliances, ice skating rinks, and non-mechanical heat transfer.
  • HFC-152a is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-12 in the following end-uses: Industrial process refrigeration and air-conditioning, cold storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, retail food refrigeration, ice machines, vending machines, water coolers, centrifugal chillers, reciprocating chillers, and residential dehumidifiers.
  • The cryo-mechanical cryogenic transport system that uses recaptured and recycled liquid carbon dioxide or liquid nitrogen is acceptable as a substitute for R-502 or CFC-12 in the transport refrigeration end-use.
  • Hydrofluroether (HFE-7200) is an acceptable substitute for CFC-113 in non-mechanical heat transfer.

Notice 10:
Effective Date: June 8, 1999

Notice 10 (June 8, 1999; 64 FR 30410)

This notice includes substitutes for; adhesives, coatings, and ink sector, aerosols sector, solvents sector, foams sector, and refrigeration and air conditioning sector. Refrigeration and air conditioning end uses include all R-502 end uses in addition to non-mechanical heat transfer, very low temperature refrigeration, and motor vehicle air conditioners. All end uses are applicable for solvent cleaning, aerosol solvents, adhesives, coatings, and ink sector.

  • THR-04 is acceptable as a substitute for R-502 in all refrigeration and air conditioning end-uses.
  • HFC-236fa, when manufactured using any process that does not convert perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) directly to HFC-236fa in a single step, is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-114 in non-mechanical heat transfer.
  • HFE-7100, Hydrofluoroether, is an acceptable substitute for CFC-113 in non-mechanical heat transfer.
  • HFC-23 is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-12 in very low-temperature refrigeration.
  • HFC-134a and HFC-152a are acceptable substitutes for HCFCs in all foam blowing end-uses.
  • Carbon dioxide and water are acceptable substitute for HCFCs in all foam blowing end-uses.
  • HFC-4310mee is acceptable as a substitute for HCFC-141b in all solvents cleaning and aerosol solvent end-uses.
  • Benzotrifluoride is an acceptable substitute with an exposure limit (AEL) of 100 ppm for all solvent cleaning, aerosols solvents, adhesives, coatings, and inks end-uses.

Notice 9:
Effective Date: May 22, 1998

Notice 9 (May 22, 1998; 63 FR 28251)

This is a summary of acceptable decisions of substitutes for aerosol propellants. CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-114, HCFC-22, and HCFC-142b are being replaced by HFC-227ea.

Notice 8:
Notice 8 (February 24, 1998; 63 FR 9151)

This notice contains substitutes for end uses in solvent cleaning, aerosols, foam blowing, and refrigeration and air conditioning. The end uses for foam blowing are CFCs, HCFCs, and polyurethane integral skin, with acceptable substitutions of formic acid and acetone. The end uses for aerosol solvents are CFC-11, CFC-113, MCF, and HCFC-141b, with an acceptable substitution of C5-C20 petroleum hydrocarbons. The solvent end uses include metal cleaning, electronic cleaning and precision cleaning with CFC-113. There are many refrigeration and air conditioning end-uses.

Notice 7:
Effective Date: June 3, 1997

Notice 7 (June 3, 1997; 62 FR 30275)

This notice lists GHG-X5, MT-31, HCFC-22, HCFC-142b, and GHG-X5 as substitutes for foam blowing, refrigeration, and air conditioning. The foam blowing end uses are HCFCs, polyurethane integral skin with an acceptable substitute of sub-saturated light hydrocarbons C3-C6. CFC-12 centrifugal and reciprocating chillers, industrial process refrigeration, cold storage warehouses, refrigerated transport, retail food refrigeration, vending machines, water coolers, commercial ice machines, household refrigerators, household freezers, and residential dehumidifiers (retrofitted and new). Also, CFC-12 motor vehicle air conditioning, automotive and non-automotive (retrofitted and new).

Notice 6:
Effective Date: March 10, 1997

Notice 6 (March 10, 1997; 62 FR 10700)

This notice contains substitutes for refrigeration and the foam sector. Substitutes include HFC-236fa and saturated light hydrocarbons C3-C6. The refrigeration sector end-use is CFC-114 industrial process refrigeration, with an acceptable substitute of HFC-236fa. The foam sector acceptable decisions are for the end-uses of HCFCs rigid polyurethane and polyisocyanurate laminated boardstock, HCFCs rigid polyurethane appliance, and saturated light hydrocarbons C3-C6. There are various acceptable substitutes for these end uses in the foam sector.

Notice 5:
Effective Date: September 5, 1996

Notice 5 (September 5, 1996; 61 FR 47012)

This notice expands the list of acceptable and pending substitutes and clarifies information on refrigerant blends R-410A, R-410B, and R-407C that EPA previously added to the acceptable substitute list. This notice lists acceptable substitutes in various and uses in refrigeration and air conditioning, foam blowing, fire suppression, explosion protection, solvent cleaning, aerosols, adhesives, coatings, and inks. There are also pending substitutes, n-propyl bromide and HFC-4310, listed in aerosols and solvent cleaning.

  • Hot Shot, GHG-X4, Freezone, Freeze 12, G2018C, NARM-502, and R-401C are acceptable substitutes for the refrigeration and air conditioning sectors.
  • R-507, ammonia, evaporative and desiccant cooling, and water/lithium bromide are acceptable substitutes for HCFC-22 in refrigeration and air conditioning end-uses.
  • Proprietary Blowing Agent 1 (PBA 1) is an acceptable substitute for CFCs in HCFCs for rigid polyurethane and polyisocyanurate laminated boardstock foam; rigid polyurethane appliance; rigid polyurethane slabstock and other; and rigid polyurethane spray and commercial refrigeration, and sandwich panels.
  • Foam A is acceptable as a Halon 1301 substitute for fire suppression and explosion protection.
  • Hydrofluoroether (HFE-7100) is an acceptable substitute for CFC-113 and methyl chloroform (MCF) in solvents cleaning, and aerosol solvents.
  • Trans-1, 2-dichloroethylene is acceptable as an alternative to MCF and CFC-113 in adhesives.

Notice 4:
Effective Date: February 8, 1996

Notice 4 (February 8, 1996; 61 FR 4736)

This notice lists acceptable substitutes for the end-uses of refrigerants, fire suppression and explosion protection, foam blowing, and solvent cleaning.

  • HCFC Blend Beta was listed as containing HFC-134a, HCFC-124, and isobutane. In fact, according to the submission on file with EPA, this blend contains butane. The determination that this blend is acceptable subject to certain use conditions applied to the actual blend, not to the incorrectly listed one.
  • R-508, which contains HFC-23 and R-116, is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-13, R-13B1, and R-503 in retrofitted and new very low temperature refrigeration.
  • HCFC Blend Delta is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-12 in retrofitted household refrigerators and freezers.
  • HCFC Blend Lambda is acceptable as a substitute for R-500 in retrofitted centrifugal chillers and as a substitute for CFC-12 in the following new and retrofitted end-uses.
  • R-410A, R-410B, and R-407C are acceptable substitutes for HCFC-22. The following are the new end-uses for the substitutes: centrifugal, reciprocating, and screw chillers, industrial process refrigeration systems, very-low-temperature industrial process refrigeration, industrial process air conditioning, ice skating rinks, refrigerated transport, retail food refrigeration, cold storage warehouses, vending machines, water coolers, commercial ice machines, household refrigerators and freezers, residential dehumidifiers, household and light commercial air conditioning.
  • HFC-134a is acceptable as a substitute for HCFC-22 in new Household and Light Commercial Air Conditioning.

Notice 3:
Effective Date: July 28, 1995

Notice 3 (July 28, 1995; 60 FR 38729)

This notice lists acceptable substitutes for end-uses in refrigeration and air conditioning sector, as well as fire suppression and explosion protection sector.

  • Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxanes and decamethylcyclopentasiloxanes are acceptable as substitutes for CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, CFC-114, and CFC-115 in new and retrofitted heat transfer systems in the refrigeration and air conditioning sector.
  • Water is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, CFC-114, and CFC-115 in new and retrofitted heat transfer systems.
  • Mineral oil is acceptable as a substitute for CFC- 11, CFC-12, CFC-113, CFC-114, and CFC-115 in new and retrofitted heat transfer systems.
  • R-508, which contains HFC-23 and R-116, is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-13, R-13B1, and R-503 in retrofitted and new industrial process refrigeration.
  • Ammonia absorption is acceptable as an alternative technology to household refrigerators and freezers using CFC-12 as a refrigerant.
  • Water Mist systems using potable water or natural seawater are acceptable as Halon 1301 and Halon 1211 substitutes.

Notice 2:
Effective Date: January 13, 1995

Notice 2 (January 13, 1995; 60 FR 3318)

This notice states acceptable substitutes for the refrigeration and air conditioning sector, as well as the foam blowing sector.

  • R-401A and R-401B, which consist of HCFC-22, HFC-152a, and HCFC- 124, are acceptable as substitutes for CFC-11, CFC-12, R-500, and R-502 in various refrigeration and air conditioning end-uses.
  • CO2 is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-13, R-13B1, and R-503 in various refrigeration and air conditioning end-uses.
  • HCFC-22 and HFC-134a are acceptable as substitutes for R-400 (60/40) and CFC-114 in New Industrial Process Air Conditioning.
  • R-401A and R-401B are acceptable as a substitutes for R-400(60/40) and CFC-114 in Retrofitted Industrial Process Air Conditioning.
  • R-404A, which consists of HFC-125, HFC-143a, and HFC-134a, is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-12 in new household refrigerators.
  • R-507, which consists of HFC-125 and HFC-143a, is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-12 in new household refrigerators.
  • Hydrocarbon Blend B is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-12 in retrofitted and new industrial process refrigeration systems.

Notice 1:
Effective Date: August 26, 1994

Notice 1 (August 26, 1994; 59 FR 44240)

This notice lists acceptable substitutes for the refrigeration and air conditioning sector, foam blowing sector, solvent cleaning sector, fire suppression and explosion protection sector, and the aerosol sector.

  • R-406A is acceptable as a substitute for R-500 in retrofitted centrifugal chillers.
  • HCFC-123, R-406, R-407A, R-407B, and HCFC Blend Epsilon are acceptable substitutes for CFC-11, CFC-12, and R-502 for end-uses in the refrigeration and air conditioning sectors.
  • HFC-23, R-403, and PFC Blend Alpha are acceptable substitute for CFC-13, R-13B1, and R-503 in the refrigeration and air conditioning sectors.
  • HCFC Blend Gamma is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-12 and R-502 in various end-uses in refrigeration and air conditioning.
  • R-402A and R-402B are acceptable as substitutes for CFC-11, CFC-12, and R-502 in retrofitted household freezers.
  • R-507 is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-12 and R-502 in various end-uses in refrigeration and air conditioning.
  • The Electroset Manufacturing Technology is an acceptable substitute for CFC-11 blown rigid polyurethane and polyisocyanurate laminated boardstock foams.
  • HFC-143a is acceptable as an alternative to CFC-12 in polystyrene boardstock and billet foams.
  • Saturated Light Hydrocarbons C3-C6 Saturated light hydrocarbons C3-C6 (and blends thereof) are acceptable as substitutes for CFC-11 and methyl chloroform in polyurethane flexible foam.
  • Methylene chloride is acceptable as a substitute for CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-114 in polyolefin foams.
  • Polyolefin Chemical Blend A is an acceptable substitute for CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-114 in polyolefin foams.
  • HFC-152a/Saturated Light Hydrocarbons C3-C6 blends are acceptable substitutes for CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-114 in polyolefin foams.
  • Trans-1, 2-dichloroethylene is acceptable as an alternative to MCF and CFC-113 in electronic, precision, and metals cleaning.
  • Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxanes and decamethylcyclopentasiloxanes are acceptable alternatives to MCF and CFC-113 in electronic, precision, and metals cleaning.
  • HCFC-123 is an acceptable substitute for CFC-113 and MCF in precision cleaning.
  • HCFC-124, HCFC Blend C, HCFC Blend D, and Gelled Halocarbon/Dry Chemical Suspension are acceptable as Halon 1211 substitutes.
  • HCFC Blend A is acceptable as a medical sterilant substitute for 12/88 CFC-12/EtO.

Other SNAP Federal Register Publications

Notice of Proposed Settlement with OZ Technology, Inc. (September 22, 1995; 60 FR 49275)
Notice of Denial of Petition from OZ Technology, Inc. (September 25, 1995; 60 FR 49407)
Notice of Denial of 2nd Petition from OZ Technology, Inc. (September 30, 1996; 61 FR 51018)
This petition requested that EPA find HC-12a® acceptable and HFC-134a unacceptable. The Notice simply alerts the public to the petition and the response, and gives the location where people can find each document. The petition itself was not submitted to EPA electronically and is not available. However, the cover letter to EPA's response may be read online or the entire 30-page response may be downloaded in WordPerfect 5.1 format (120K). The formats below refer to the Notice, not the response itself.

Notice of Denial of 3rd Petition from OZ Technology, Inc. (January 21, 1999; 64 FR 3272)

This petition requested that EPA find HC-12a® acceptable. The Notice simply alerts the public to the petition and the response, and gives the location where people can find each document. The petition itself was not submitted to EPA electronically and is not available. However, the cover letter to EPA's response may be read online and the entire response is available (18 pp, 57 K). The formats below refer to the Notice, not the response itself.
Notice of Data Availability; New Information Concerning SNAP Program Proposal on HCFC Use in Foams (May 23, 2001; 66 FR 28408)
Notice of Data Availability; Reports on CO2 Total Flooding Fire Extinguishing Systems (May 11, 2004; 69 FR 26059)

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