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Sites in Reuse in Massachusetts

Atlas Tack Corp. Green Infrastructure

The Atlas Tack Corporation site, located in Fairhaven, Massachusetts, includes 20 acres of land and wetlands. The original facility, constructed in 1901, manufactured tacks and steel nails until its closing in 1985. Operations discharged acids and metal-processing wastes into drains and an on-site, unlined acid neutralizing lagoon next to saltwater tidal marshes that extend into the Buzzards Bay Estuary. Waste disposal practices resulted in contamination of soil and ground water. In 1990, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Beginning in 2004, EPA conducted cleanup activities at the site including demolition of on-site structures, removal of contaminated soil, site and ground water monitoring, and site restoration. EPA completed cleanup activities in 2007. EPA restored wetland areas on site to their pre-industrial condition and made enhancements to the wetlands to preserve the natural, scenic habitat. EPA assisted the community with determining appropriate future uses of the site which included commercial and industrial reuse as well as ecological and recreational reuse of the wetland areas.
Updated 1/2013

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Cannon Engineering Corporation
Site photo

The Town of Bridgewater and a local propane distribution business have undertaken an unusual effort to clean up and redevelop the six-acre Cannon Engineering Corporation (CEC) Superfund site in Bridgewater, Massachusetts. Beginning in the 1970s, CEC transported hazardous wastes as well as stored and burned hazardous wastes at the site. Mishandling of the waste and various reporting violations led to the closure of the facility in 1980. In 1982, the state removed contaminated sludge and drums from the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. In the mid-1990s, Osterman Propane Distribution (Osterman) relocated to the former CEC facility. Osterman stores and distributes propane at the site, and sells gas appliances and related equipment. In 1998, Omnipoint Communications Enterprises, Inc. began leasing a portion of the site and constructed a cellular communication tower. EPA continues to monitor the site by conducting a review of the cleanup actions every five years to ensure the remedy remains protective of human health and the environment.
Updated 1/2013

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Fort Devens Green Infrastructure
Site photo

The Fort Devens Superfund site, once a military base with extensive contamination, is now part of a large-scale redevelopment effort in central Massachusetts. Soil and ground water contamination resulted from military activities at the site since 1917. In 1989, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). The closure and cleanup of the site attracted numerous public and private sector organizations that recognized the redevelopment potential of part of the site. Redevelopment authority MassDevelopment has brought warehouses and distribution centers, manufacturing and industrial space, and research and development facilities to the site. Several federal agencies, including the Department of Justice, the Department of Labor, and the Department of Defense, have put almost 600 acres of the site back into productive use. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) used another 836 acres of the site to expand the Oxbow National Wildlife Refuge. The successful partnership between EPA, the Department of Defense, the U.S. Army, the State of Massachusetts and MassDevelopment in support of redevelopment has contributed to increased employment opportunities as well as increased revenue for the local community.
Updated 1/2013

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Fort Devens Sudbury Training Annex Green Infrastructure
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The Fort Devens Sudbury Training Annex Superfund site, a former U.S. Army military installation, covers approximately four square miles and includes portions of the towns of Maynard, Stow, Hudson, and Sudbury, Massachusetts. Established in 1942, the site served as an ammunition depot, an ordnance test station, a troop training and research area, and a laboratory disposal area. EPA identified contamination resulting from use of pesticides and other chemicals on portions of the site and added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. The U.S. Army worked with EPA to remove contaminated soil, cover an on-site landfill with a cap, remove underground storage tanks, and monitor ground water. Currently, several entities own portions of the site. In 2000, the Army transferred 2,230 acres of the site to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). USFWS established the Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge on the transferred land. In 2005, USFWS completed construction of walking trails within the refuge. In 2008, USFWS completed restoration of Russell Bridge. In 2010, a visitor center and other park amenities opened at the refuge. USFWS used green building techniques when constructing the visitor center, which includes a geothermal heating system and solar panels. The visitor center welcomes visitors Thursday through Sunday. The refuge provides recreational opportunities including hiking, canoeing, guided tours of the military bunkers on site, hunting and fishing. USFWS’s future plans for the refuge include educational demonstration areas, restoration of on-site bunkers, an urban education area and a rail-to- trail project at the abandoned railroad on the south side of the refuge. In 2002, the Army transferred four acres to the US Air Force (USAF). USAF uses the area for operation of a radar and weather station. In 2003, the Army transferred approximately 72 acres of the site to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). FEMA uses the land for its operations and training missions. FEMA has cleared six acres for use as a temporary antenna field.
Updated 1/2013

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GE/Housatonic River Site Alternative Energy Green Infrastructure

The GE-Pittsfield/Housatonic River site includes a 254-acre former manufacturing facility, filled river oxbows, neighboring commercial properties, Allendale School, Silver Lake and other areas contains contamination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other hazardous substances released from the General Electric Company (GE) facility located in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. The Site also includes the Housatonic River and floodplains from Pittsfield, Massachusetts to Long Island Sound. The portion of the River beginning two miles south of the GE facility is referred to as Rest of River, and a cleanup decision on Rest of River is currently pending. A Consent Decree entered in federal Court in 2000 specified the cleanup of all other areas of the site. Since 2000, extensive cleanup of the Site has occurred with 17 of 20 cleanup actions outside the river completed and the remediation of Silver Lake (the 18th cleanup action) currently underway. The remaining two cleanup actions outside the river are expected to be completed within the next 5 years and two miles of the Housatonic River have also been cleaned up.

As part of on-going cleanup activities, the community has prioritized the reuse of the former GE facility, located in the heart of downtown Pittsfield. Funded by a Superfund Redevelopment pilot grant, the Pittsfield Economic Development Authority (PEDA) developed a reuse plan that outlined opportunities for sports fields and an office park. In 2004, GE built a three-acre recreational facility on site for the community, including a baseball diamond, soccer field, jogging track, equipment storage, fencing and lighting. From 2005 through February 2012, PEDA received ownership of 50 acres of the site for the development of the William Stanley Business Park. The William Stanley Business Park provides commercial and industrial space for area businesses. The Park’s first tenant, a financial services company, constructed a 170,000 square-foot building from 2011 to May 2012, with an official opening of the building in June 2012. Also, in 2010, Western Massachusetts Electric Company installed an 8-acre solar power facility, using two acres of the site and six acres from an adjacent property. In addition to the land transferred to PEDA, there are two large employers that continue to operate on the GE-owned portion of the 254-acre facility. Several land uses have continued on the non-GE owned portion of the site (excluding the Rest of River), including an elementary school, approximately 86 residential properties, approximately 35 commercial properties and a city park.
Updated 1/2013

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Hanscom Field/Hanscom Air Force Base

The 1,120 acre Hanscom Field/Hanscom Air Force Base (AFB) Superfund site is located in an industrial area of eastern Massachusetts. The site occupies land in the towns of Bedford, Concord, Lexington and Lincoln. In 1942, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts leased the Bedford airport to the War Department for use by the Army Air Forces. In February 1943, the airport was renamed Laurence G. Hanscom Field. Military flight operations at the site ended in 1973. In August 1974, the Air Force terminated its lease of the airfield portion of Hanscom Field, which reverted to state control, but retained the right to use the field. Military use of the site resulted in the contamination of ground water and subsurface soil with chlorinated solvents, jet fuel and other petroleum compounds. Site investigations identified a total of 22 possible sources, including former fire training, disposal, underground storage tank and other spill sites. Site cleanup involves three phases: initial removal actions, long-term remedial action and long-term monitoring. Under state oversight prior to the site’s National Priorities List (NPL) listing in 1994, the potentially responsible party completed interim remedial action operations, including the excavation of contaminated soil and underground storage tanks and the installation of a ground water extraction and treatment system. EPA’s cleanup plan, as documented in a 2007 Record of Decision (ROD), includes the continued operation of the site’s ground water treatment system, land use controls, and the monitoring of ground water and surface water. Today, the Massachusetts Port Authority currently operates L.G. Hanscom Field as a civilian airport. Hanscom AFB, an active base owned and operated by the U.S. Air Force, is located on the other 396 acres of the site. Hanscom AFB is home to the Electronic Systems Center, which provides command and control and information systems to the U.S. Department of Defense and U.S. allies.
Updated 10/2013

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Hatheway and Patterson
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The 40-acre Hatheway and Patterson site in Mansfield, Massachusetts includes the area where Hatheway and Patterson Company operated a wood preserving facility from 1953 until 1993. Wood treating operations used pentachlorophenol (PCP) in fuel oil, creosote, fluoro-chrome-arsenate-phenol salts, chromated copper-arsenate, fire retardants and other chemicals. Releases of chemicals used during operations resulted in ground water contamination, as well as contamination of Rumford River’s fisheries and wetlands. The site received $20 million through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to conduct soil, ground water and surface water cleanup activities. Expedited cleanup allowed for portions of the site to be put into reuse right away. Currently, the portion of the site located near the Mansfield train station includes a 119-space commuter rail parking lot. Users of the lot can take advantage of a free shuttle service provided by the Greater Attleboro Taunton Regional Transit Authority to and from the train station.
Updated 1/2013

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Industri-Plex Green Infrastructure
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A unique public/private partnership has resulted in the redevelopment of the Industri-Plex Superfund site. A regional transportation center, a major commercial and retail district and a wetland preserve now occupy the site, located in Woburn, Massachusetts just 12 miles outside of Boston. From 1853 to 1969, several manufacturers produced chemicals, insecticides, munitions and glue products made from raw and chrome-tanned animal hides at the site. As a result, large waste piles of animal hides, heavy metals and other hazardous chemicals collected on site. In 1983, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA and the State of Massachusetts constructed several protective covers over contaminated portions of the site to allow for productive reuse of the areas. Following cleanup activities, several public and private sector improvements took place at the site including a new interstate highway exchange, public roads, a 200,000 square-foot shopping center, an office park and a hotel complex. Restored wetlands and grass-covered hills provide scenic open space at the site. EPA recognized the site’s successful redevelopment with prestigious Phoenix Award in 2000. Then in 2001, the 34-acre, $10-million James Anderson Regional Transportation Center opened at the site. The center relieves congestion on several highways leading into Boston and eases the commutes of many area residents.

EPA supported another redevelopment opportunity at the Industri-Plex Superfund Site from 2008-2009 resulting in the construction of a Chipotle Restaurant and a 27,000 square foot Bob’s Discount Furniture Store. EPA and the state approved the transfer of the existing developed property to a developer. The developer worked with EPA and the state to record institutional controls for the property at the registry of deeds and to prepare work plans to protect the remedy, public health and environment during redevelopment. The developer also worked closely with EPA and local government tearing down the existing building and transforming the property. Both stores were open by September 2009.
Updated 1/2013

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Iron Horse Park Alternative Energy
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The Iron Horse Park Superfund site, a 553-acre industrial complex, is located in Billerica, Massachusetts. Industrial activities, which began in 1913, have included manufacturing and rail yard maintenance. Additionally, there are open storage areas, several landfills and wastewater lagoons on site. Operations resulted in contamination of soil, ground water and surface water at the site. EPA added the site to the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Site cleanup activities continue and have included removal of contaminated soil, filling areas with clean soil, and closing and capping landfills. EPA’s cleanup activities have supported the continued operation of various industrial businesses on site. These include lumber, manufacturing and rail yard maintenance facilities. Cleanup activities have also resulted in restored natural marshes and new wetland habitats. In 2012, site stakeholders began moving forward with a project to place solar panels on a former on-site waste disposal area called Shaffer Landfill. Following coordination with EPA and the state, the town of Billerica signed a payment in lieu of taxes (PILOT) agreement in August 2013. The PILOT agreement guarantees project revenue over 25 years. With the agreement in place, construction of the 25-acre solar array began in early 2014. Urban Green Technologies (UGT), the solar developer, placed 20,000 panels over the capped landfill. EPA worked with UGT to address the engineering challenges of installing solar panels on this sloped landfill while ensuring the landfill cap remained intact. In August 2014, EPA, UGT and the town of Billerica held a ceremony marking the project’s completion. The 20,000 panels generate about 6 megawatts of electricity. Reuse of the site allows Billerica to reduce dependence on fossil fuels and garner significant long-term energy cost savings.
Updated 9/2014

Materials Technology Laboratory (USARMY) Green Infrastructure

The Materials Technology Laboratory (USARMY) Superfund site, better known as the “Arsenal”, is located in Watertown, Massachusetts. In 1816, the U.S. Army began their operations at the site and employed 10,000 people by the end of World War II. The Army used the site for a variety of military- and war-related activities, including weapons and ammunition manufacturing and storage, as well as nuclear reactor and molecular and atomic structure research activities in the 1960s. In 1987, the Army discovered contamination during a site inspection. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List in 1994. Cleanup activities removed contamination and demolished an on-site nuclear reactor. From 1996 to 2005, the Watertown Arsenal Development Corporation (WADC), helped to facilitate redevelopment of 30 acres of the site. Harvard University purchased the area and constructed a mixed use complex called Arsenal on the Charles, which incorporates the style and architecture of the original brick buildings in the area. The complex includes apartments, retail stores, restaurants, a child care facility, a fitness center, corporate offices and various other businesses. The Arsenal Center for the Arts, also located within the complex, serves as an important cultural asset to the community with a theater, gallery space, artists’ studios, and other resources and services. The Commander’s Mansion, a historic landmark, occupies a 7.2 acre area of the site and provides a space for meetings and formal functions. The popular Squibnocket Park is located on an 11-acre parcel along the Charles River and provides biking and walking trails, as well as access to the Watertown Yacht Club, a privately-owned marina that has been operating since 1940. The Army restored wetlands along the Charles River and EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2006.
Updated 1/2013

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Natick Laboratory Army Research, Development, and Engineering

The 78-acre Natick Laboratory Army Research, Development, and Engineering Center Superfund site is located in Natick, Massachusetts. The site occupies a peninsula on the eastern shore of Lake Cochituate. The U.S. Army built the Natick Laboratory in 1954 and has conducted research and development activities on site. Practices at the site resulted in soil, ground water and surface water contamination with various volatile organic compounds and heavy metals. In 1989, personnel at the facility noticed a sheen on the site runoff water generated during rainstorms. Construction workers also noticed a benzene-like odor in soil on site. The U.S. Army conducted soil gas surveys and detected several types of volatile organic compounds. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1994. Cleanup activities included ground water containment, treatment and monitoring; soil excavation and removal; and sediment removal. The site includes an active U.S. Army research and testing facility for researching, developing and managing food, clothing, shelters, airdrop systems and soldier support items.
Updated 10/2013

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New Bedford

The 18,000-acre New Bedford Harbor site includes sediments contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and heavy metals. At least two manufacturers in New Bedford, Massachusetts, used PCBs while producing electric devices from 1940 to the late 1970s. Operations discharged industrial wastes directly into the harbor and indirectly into the harbor via the city's sewage system, contaminating the tidal estuary habitat of the harbor from the upper Acushnet River into Buzzards Bay. In 1983, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). Ongoing cleanup activities include dredging and capping of contaminated sediments as well as soil excavation and wetland restoration at shoreline properties. The site received $30 million through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to support cleanup activities. Following the completion of cleanup activities, New Bedford will reuse EPA's 6-acre shoreline dewatering facility, located on the City’s working waterfront, as an intermodal transportation facility. The facility will include 350 feet of berthing space for freighters or commercial fishing vessels, a 55,000 square foot warehouse and a rail spur connecting to the City's rail yard. Cleanup activities in 2009 led to the discovery of a shipwrecked vessel in the harbor. Archeological investigations dated the vessel between the late 1700s and early 1800s. In 2011, EPA completed demolition of the 11-acre Aerovox mill, located along the Acushnet River, providing the City with additional space for future redevelopment. Local residents use the harbor for recreational activities such as rowing.
Updated 1/2013

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Norwood PCBs
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The 26-acre Norwood PCB site is located on Route 1 in a commercial area of Norwood, Massachusetts. Beginning in 1942, several businesses have manufactured and maintained electrical components at the site. Operations continued until site owners subdivided the site in the mid-1980s. During site investigations, EPA identified polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the soil and groundwater on site as well as in sediment of a nearby brook. In 1986, EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities at the site have included excavation and consolidation of contaminated soil and sediment beneath an asphalt cap, demolition of on-site structures, construction and operation of a ground water treatment facility from 1996-2001, and implementation of a long-term ground water, surface water and sediment monitoring plan. In 2008, the site property owner and developers finished construction of a 56,000 square feet commercial/retail space. Developers located the new buildings adjacent to the “permanent cap area” and brought in additional pavement to enable use of the permanent cap area as a central parking lot, thus increasing the thickness of the asphalt cap remedy.
Updated 1/2013

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Nyanza Chemical Waste Dump Green Infrastructure

The 35-acre Nyanza Chemical Waste Dump Superfund site is located in Ashland, Massachusetts. From 1917 to 1978, site operators produced textile dyes, dye intermediates and other products. Site operators discharged industrial wastewater to a system of creeks and outfalls that discharged to nearby surface water bodies (i.e., Eastern Wetland and the Sudbury River), and buried solid waste on site. Former site activities resulted in the contamination of ground water, soil, sediments and surface water, mainly with heavy metals and chlorinated organics. More recently, indoor air sampling from residences downgradient from the site revealed potentially unsafe levels of vapors. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities include excavation of sludge and contaminated soils and sediments, the construction of a protective cap over contaminated soils, and installation of vapor mitigation systems in homes above the ground water contamination. Cleanup activities continue and include the installation of two product recovery wells in 2013. With regard to the Sudbury River, EPA completed its cleanup design for contaminated areas of the Sudbury River in 2013. EPA is awaiting construction funding to place a thin sand cap over an 86-acre portion of the Sudbury River.
Updated 10/2013

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Otis Air National Guard Base/Camp Edwards Alternative Energy

The 22,000-acre Otis Air National Guard Base/Camp Edwards Superfund site is located on western Cape Cod in Barnstable County, Massachusetts. Also known as the Joint Base Cape Cod (JBCC) (formerly known as Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) until July 13, 2013), the site lies about 60 miles south of Boston and immediately southeast of the Cape Cod Canal. Since its establishment in 1935, the MMR’s primary mission has been to provide training and housing to U.S. Air Force and U.S. Army units. Historical chemical and fuel spills; fire training activities; and sewage treatment plant, landfill and drainage structure operations contaminated site soil and ground water. Investigations in 1983 and 1984 found volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in on-site and nearby monitoring wells as well as in several hundred private wells. The main contaminants of concern include VOCs and heavy metals. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in November 1989 and documented the site cleanup plan in over 15 Record of Decision (ROD) documents. Cleanup activities include the installation of water supply lines to affected residents, installation of municipal water supply well treatment systems, treatment of 100,000 tons of soil, and construction and operation of many on-site and off-site ground water treatment plants. The treatment plants include extraction and reinjection wells and treat about 10.6 million gallons of contaminated ground water per day. EPA has completed cleanups at 25 separate source areas and issued a preliminary close-out report in December 2009. This report marked the completion of all remedy construction activities at the site. The Barnstable County Correctional Facility, a jail with a capacity for about 580 inmates, began operating on site in 2004. The Air Force installed a total of three 1.5 megawatt wind turbines – one in 2009 and two more in 2011 – to offset electrical costs for powering numerous ground water cleanup systems at the MMR. The Air Force estimates that the wind energy saves about $1.5 million a year in electrical costs. EPA’s cleanup plans allowed continued site operations throughout the cleanup process. Today, five major organizations continue to use the MMR: 1) The Massachusetts Air National Guard (ANG) operates Camp Edwards 2) The ANG/Massachusetts ANG operates Otis ANG Base 3) The U.S. Air Force operates Cape Cod Air Force Station 4) The U.S. Coast Guard operates Air Station Cape Cod 5) The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs operates the Massachusetts National Cemetery.
Updated 10/2013

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South Weymouth Naval Air Station
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The South Weymouth Naval Air Station consists of 1,442 acres in the towns of Weymouth, Abington and Rockland, Massachusetts. Historically, military operations at the site included aviation training, aircraft maintenance and refueling, personnel training, housing and administrative support services. Waste disposal activities also took place at the site and included three landfills, a tile leachfield used for the disposal of battery acid and burn pits for fire training. After sampling confirmed on-site contamination in 1991, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1994. The base closed under the Base Realignment and Closure Act (BRAC) and cleanup began in 1997. The local reuse authority, the U.S. Coast Guard and the Federal Aviation Administration have received over 600 acres of the site. Redevelopment negotiations between the Navy and private developers took place from 1997 until 2011, when a private developer purchased the remaining site acreage. The $25 million transaction provides the developer, LNR Property Corp., with land to complete redevelopment work on a new mixed use community at the site called SouthField. Following its completion, SouthField will include 2,800 homes, 2 million square feet of stores and offices, a golf course, athletic fields and other facilities.
Updated 1/2013

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Sullivan's Ledge Green Infrastructure
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The Sullivan’s Ledge site includes a 12-acre former quarry that operated until 1921. In 1935, the City of New Bedford assumed ownership of the site and converted it to a dump for hazardous materials. Waste disposal activities occurred at the site from the 1940s until the 1970s when the City closed the dump and backfilled the disposal areas. The state of Massachusetts identified soil contamination at the site and EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. EPA identified additional contamination in ground water and wetland areas which extended into the neighboring golf course. Cleanup activities included placing a cap over the site, removing contaminated soil and sediment, restoring wetlands and removing contamination from the golf course. EPA conducted cleanup activities in a way that allowed the continued use of the golf course during the cleanup process.
Updated 1/2013

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Wells G & H
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The Wells G & H Superfund site includes 330 acres of land and contaminated ground water in Woburn, Massachusetts. Historically, operations at the site included dry cleaning, solvent storage, truck terminals, drum disposal and plastics manufacturing. In 1979, the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection discovered significant levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in two municipal supply wells, known as Wells G and H, and subsequently closed the two wells. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Response actions have included the excavation and removal of debris and contaminated soils, on-site treatment and incineration of contaminated soils, and extraction and treatment of contaminated ground water. EPA found soil and shallow ground water contaminant levels at the former Aberjona Auto Parts property below the human health risk for skin contact, but the ground water did not meet drinking water standards. In 2002, the City of Woburn’s Redevelopment Authority began exploring reuse options for the site. Recommendations included office and retail space, nature and walking trails, wetland restoration and an ice skating rink. In 2002, a developer seized the opportunity, purchased the property and began implementing plans to clear the junkyard of dismantled cars and transform it into an ice skating arena. Completed in 2008, the successful new ice arena not only adheres to the site’s ground water use restrictions by relying on publicly-supplied water, but it also provides enhanced recreational opportunities for community members in a region that places a high value on the sport of ice hockey. The site owner also leases other portions of the property to small businesses that support local needs, such as a dog care facility, bus storage yard and an auto supplier shop. Following sediment cleanup activities, the City plans to reuse part of the site for ecological and recreational purposes, complete with wildlife viewing platforms and hiking trails.
Updated 1/2013