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Sites in Reuse in Rhode Island

Central Landfill Alternative Energy

The Central Landfill Superfund site consists of a 154-acre landfill where disposal of municipal and hazardous material occurred prior to 1980. In 1982, the site owner complied with a state order to close the hazardous material disposal area and EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. The remedy for the site included: construction of a multi-layer cap; hydraulic containment and treatment of ground water; deed restrictions on ground water use and land development; and, conducting a detailed evaluation of the existing landfill gas collection system. Central Landfill, owned and operated by the Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation, continues to operate as a landfill, receiving over 90 percent of Rhode Island’s municipally-generated solid waste. Landfill gas is currently collected from approximately 250 acres of landfill, including the 154-acre Superfund Site. Broadrock Renewables, LLC owns and operates an energy generation facility on the site that utilizes this landfill gas and turns it into electricity. The company has expanded the energy-generating facilities in stages and these facilities now include 15 engine generator sets capable of producing approximately 20 megawatts of electricity. The Superfund site portion of the landfill currently contributes an estimated 12% of the total landfill gas collected at the site and used in the energy generation project.
Updated 1/2013

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Centredale Manor Restoration Project
Site photo

The Centredale Manor Restoration Project Superfund site includes a 9-acre property in North Providence, Rhode Island, and extends along the Woonasquatucket River to the Lyman Mill Dam and downstream. A chemical company and an incinerator-based drum reconditioning facility operated on the property at different times beginning in the early 1940s until early 1970s, when a fire in 1972 destroyed most of the site infrastructure. Operations at the site released chemicals and wastes directly onto the ground and buried or emptied them into the river, resulting in widespread contamination, including dioxin, both on site and downstream from the site. The Brook Village apartments opened in 1977 and the Centredale Manor apartments opened in 1983, both on the properties of these former facilities. EPA identified contamination in soil, sediment, ground water, surface water and biota on site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2000. EPA's early actions included capping and installation of fencing at the site, as well as removal of some contaminated soil from low-laying residential properties abutting the River and restoration of the breached Allendale Dam. Today, the Centredale Manor and Brook Village apartment complexes continue to occupy the site. EPA and other parties continue to work to identify cleanup activities compatible with the continued residential use of the site.
Updated 1/2013

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Davisville Naval Construction Battalion Center Green Infrastructure

The Davisville Naval Construction Battalion Center (Davisville NCBC) site is located 18 miles south of Providence, Rhode Island and includes 1,500 acres along the Narragansett Bay. From 1951 to 1994, Davisville NCBC provided mobilization support to naval construction forces. Operations and waste disposal practices at the site resulted in widespread soil and ground water contamination as well as surface water contamination of nearby Allen Harbor. In 1989, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). The base on site closed in 1994, and the Base Realignment and Closure Act (BRAC) is addressing cleanup activities. In September 1997, the Rhode Island Port Authority, now called the Quonset-Davisville Redevelopment Corporation, leased about 704 acres of the site. Subsequently, Quonset-Davisville Redevelopment Corporation has sold or conveyed the acreage through a Maritime Public Benefit Conveyance with 367 acres currently left in the lease. Further study is underway for this leased acreage. In May 2000, the Town of North Kingstown received 189 acres of the site through a Public Benefit Conveyance for use as a park. Restrictions on building construction are in place for the area over the ground water plume. In 2003, a Public Benefit Conveyance gave an additional 15 acres of the site to the Town of North Kingstown for use as a park. Restrictions limit the site to recreational use only and include appropriate land use requirements to ensure the landfill cap is not damaged.
Updated 1/2013

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Newport Naval Education & Training Center

The 1,063-acre Newport Naval Education & Training Center Superfund site is located in Newport, Middletown, Portsmouth and Jamestown, Rhode Island. Starting in 1900, the U.S Navy used the site as a refueling depot. From 1955 to the mid-1970s, an 11-acre portion of the site along the shore of Narrangansett Bay, known as McAllister Point Landfill, accepted wastes. The accepted wastes consisted mostly of domestic refuse, acids, solvents, paint and waste oil. Improper disposal activities at the site resulted in the contamination of ground water and soil. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup activities include tank removal, ground water treatment, landfill capping, contaminated marine sediment removal, off-site eelgrass restoration, and ground water and sediment monitoring. The U.S. Navy is investigating contamination in at several areas for cleanup, including Derecktor Shipyard (both onshore and offshore), Gould Island, five large tank farms and Carr Point. The U.S. Navy continues to operate the site as a naval base.
Updated 10/2013

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Peterson/Puritan, Inc. Alternative Energy
Site photo

The Peterson/Puritan, Inc. Superfund site spans over 500 acres in Providence County, Rhode Island. In 1959, the plant at the site began packaging aerosol consumer products. A rail car accident and tank spill on the facility's property in 1974 released 6,000 gallons of solvent. After a major fire in 1976, the company rebuilt the plant. In 1979, the State of Rhode Island Department of Health discovered contamination in ground water affecting nearby municipal well fields. The state took immediate measures to provide an alternative water supply for the local communities. EPA determined the Peterson/Puritan, Inc. facility was a source of the ground water contamination and added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Additional studies are underway to find additional sources. There are currently systems in place to clean up contaminated ground water and soil. Cooperation between EPA, Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management and the local community has enabled on-site businesses and facilities to remain operational throughout the duration of the cleanup. The State of Rhode Island and the municipality have also completed redevelopment projects within the site. These include a condominium complex, a town dog pound, a riverside park, and a bike path along the Blackstone River and Canal. The Blackstone River remains an important natural, recreational and cultural resource to both Rhode Island and Massachusetts. Recently, Megawatt Energy Solutions installed over 2,000 solar panels on the roof of a warehouse building on site. The solar array produces about 650,000 kilowatts of electricity per year. The company plans to build a similar installation for a second building on site.
Updated 4/2014

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Rose Hill Regional Landfill Alternative Energy

The Rose Hill Regional Landfill Superfund site is a former municipal landfill located in South Kingstown, Rhode Island. From 1967 to 1983, South Kingstown leased the land as a domestic and industrial waste disposal facility. Three separate areas on or near the site received waste, including a solid waste landfill, a bulky waste disposal area and a sewage sludge landfill. In 1983, the facility became inactive and the operator graded and seeded the disposal areas. EPA discovered contamination in 1981. In 1989, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). Improper disposal activities contaminated site ground water with volatile organic compounds and heavy metals and site soils and three nearby private wells with low levels of organic compounds. Site runoff has contaminated nearby surface water bodies. Early investigations found that landfill gases are moving off site in the direction of nearby residential properties. Cleanup activities included the extension of municipal water to residences with contaminated wells, installation of gas alarms for nearby residences and relocation of one residence. Landfill cleanup activities include the consolidation of landfill areas; addition of a landfill cap; installation of a landfill gas destruction system; monitoring of ground water, surface water, leaking landfill liquid and landfill gas; and implementation of ground water use restrictions. The need for additional cleanup activities will be determined based on data collected from the monitoring. A transfer station for municipal waste, currently owned and operated by South Kingstown, is located on part of the site. In addition, surrounding land uses, including a portion of the site, support a hunting preserve, a skeet shooting range, bird dog kennel and field training facilities, and a pet cemetery. Future site reuse plans remain under discussion between the Town and State partners.
Updated 10/2013

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Western Sand & Gravel

The Western Sand and Gravel site consists of approximately 25 acres of land in a rural area on the boundary of Burrillville and North Smithfield, Providence County, Rhode Island. From 1953 until 1975, the site operated as a sand and gravel quarry. From 1975 to 1979, site operators disposed of chemical and septic liquid wastes into open, unlined lagoons and pits on 12 acres of the site. Waste handling practices resulted in contamination of soil and ground water with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including toluene, trichloroethylene (TCE), trichloroethane, benzene, chlorobenzene and dichloroethane. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included removal of 60,000 gallons of liquid chemical and septic waste, installation of a ground water recirculation system, construction of an alternate water supply, capping and fencing of the contaminated soil area, the implementation of institutional controls, and the monitoring of the groundwater natural attenuation. In 2001, Supreme Mid-Atlantic, Inc. purchased the site. In 2004, Supreme Mid-Atlantic, Inc. completed construction of a 20,000 square-foot truck-body assembly building and open space for truck parking. This building and parking space occupy approximately 19 acres that are upgradient from the capped area and contaminated ground water. Supreme Mid-Atlantic, Inc. continues assembly, sales and service activities at the site.
Updated 1/2013

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