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Sites in Reuse in New Jersey

American Cyanamid Co
Site photo

The American Cyanamid Co Superfund site, located in Bridgewater Township, New Jersey, housed numerous chemical and pharmaceutical manufacturing operations for over 80 years until the facility shut down in 1999. Throughout the manufacturing history, site operators constructed a number of waste storage and disposal areas, which contaminated the surrounding soils and ground water. In 1983, EPA added the 575-acre site to the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1996, Remedial workers addressed contamination on a 140-acre portion of the site referred to as the Hill Property. The Hill Property portion of the site differs from the former main plant of the site and includes a research laboratory and administrative buildings. A March 1992 Baseline Site-Wide Endangerment Assessment Report established that there are no current or future unacceptable risks to human health and the environment associated with the Hill Property. Based on this finding, EPA did not require remedial actions for the Hill Property soils. NJDEP issued a no further action remedy in July 1996. EPA deleted the Hill Property portion of the site from the NPL on December 29, 1998. By working together, EPA, the NJDEP and the local community stakeholders helped bring beneficial commercial redevelopment to this conveniently located property. Redevelopment planning efforts paved the way for the construction of the $80 million Bridgewater Promenade. This multi-use complex provides retail, hotel and office space. Additionally, a 6,300-seat minor league baseball stadium opened on a portion of the property in 1999.
Updated 1/2013

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Asbestos Dump Green Infrastructure
Site photo

The Asbestos Dump Superfund site consists of an 11-acre property in Millington, New Jersey and three separate satellite sites: 1) the 12-acre White Bridge Road site, 2) the 30-acre New Vernon Road site, and 3) the 7-acre Dietzman Tract site within the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge (GSNWR). Beginning in 1927, a succession of owners operated an asbestos products manufacturing plant at the Millington site. Owners conducted landfilling and disposal of asbestos waste materials, including broken asbestos tiles and fibers, at the Millington site and the three satellite sites until 1975. EPA added the entire site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup actions at the sites included erecting signs and fences, capping, installing a soil cover over areas of exposed asbestos, stabilizing slopes along asbestos mounds, removing asbestos-containing materials on the ground surface, and in-situ solidification and stabilization of asbestos-containing materials. Workers excavated asbestos materials from the Dietzman Tract site and either disposed of the material off site or consolidated the material on site in a landfill. Workers also excavated, consolidated, solidified/stabilized and then capped on-site asbestos-containing material from about 5 acres of the New Vernon Road site and the White Bridge Road site. A 25-acre portion of the New Vernon Road site was transferred to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 2002 and is now used as part of the GSNWR. A residential property and horse farm are now located on the White Bridge Road site. EPA removed the White Bridge Road site from the NPL in 2002, and removed the remaining satellite sites from the NPL in 2010.
Updated 1/2013

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Brick Township Landfill Alternative Energy

The 42-acre Brick Township Landfill Superfund site in Brick Township, New Jersey operated for more than 30 years, accepting sewage, solids, bulk liquids and other wastes. A private owner operated the landfill until 1973, when Brick Township acquired the property. The Township continued operation of the landfill until the landfill’s closing in 1979. Years of dumping resulted in contaminated ground water, sediment and soil. Residential areas and new development surround the site. About 58,000 people live within three miles of the site and ground water is the source of public and private drinking supplies for many. Restrictions are in place to prevent use of public or private wells that are within the area of contaminated ground water. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. After multiple samplings events, EPA selected a final remedy for the site in 2008. Brick Township initiated design and cleanup activities in 2009. The Township recently entered into an agreement with Standard Alternative, LLC, to allow the company to lease the site property to install a field of solar panels. The field contains over 28,000 panels and produces 7.8MWh of electricity per year. The solar array will save Brick Township about $13 million in municipal energy costs over 15 years.
Updated 4/2014

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Brook Industrial Park

The 4.5-acre Brook Industrial Park Superfund site is located on the northern bank of the Raritan River in the Borough of Bound Brook, New Jersey. The 4.5-acre site included three buildings: the Stirling Center, the Blue Spruce International building and the National Metal Finishings Corporation building. Beginning in 1971, several companies conducted industrial, chemical, and pesticide production and storage operations on the site. Many of the companies performed poor housekeeping and waste disposal practices. Between 1980 and 1988, state site investigations found leaking drums and illegal waste discharges to the soil, ground water and the Raritan River. Site investigations found that business operations at the site contaminated soil, ground water and surface water with pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), heavy metals and dioxin. In 1983, EPA used emergency funds to address dioxin-contamination at the Blue Spruce International building. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. EPA selected a cleanup plan to address contaminated soil, ground water and contamination of the Blue Spruce International building in a 1994 Record of Decision (ROD). Cleanup activities included demolition and off-site disposal of the dioxin-contaminated material from the Blue Spruce International building, excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated soils, installation of a ground water extraction and treatment system and long-term monitoring. EPA completed the Blue Spruce International building demolition in 1999, soil cleanup in 2006 and construction of the ground water treatment system in the summer of 2006. Today, James Fine Chemicals, Inc. and National Metal Finishings Corporation operate at the site. EPA’s cleanup plan enabled the two businesses to continue operating throughout the cleanup process. JFC operates a bulk pharmaceutical manufacturing operation, producing specialty chemicals. National Metal Finishings Corporation performs metal plating processes.
Updated 10/2013

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Chemsol, Inc. Green Infrastructure

The 40-acre Chemsol, Inc. Superfund site is located in Piscataway, New Jersey. From the 1950s through 1964, Chemsol, Inc. operated a chemical solvent processing facility on site. Workers blended, mixed and separated liquid solvents and various flammable materials. Several recorded accidents occurred on site, including fires and explosions. In 1964, a chemical gas release forced an emergency evacuation of nearby residents and the Township of Piscataway ordered Chemsol, Inc. to shut down. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in September 1983. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) directed the new owner of the site, Tang Realty, to investigate the soil and ground water contamination. Tang Realty installed 40 monitoring wells and then removed contaminated soils from the site in 1988. In 1991, EPA released an official plan to address contaminated ground water. By 1994, EPA completed construction of a ground water treatment plant. In 2011, agencies decided to double the capacity of the treatment plant to expedite the cleanup. Wetland areas disturbed by the soil excavation are now fully restored and provide green space for Piscataway.
Updated 10/2013

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Cooper Road

Cleanup of the Cooper Road Superfund site has allowed for the site’s use as part of the expanding residential development in Voorhees Township, New Jersey. In 1982, local authorities found several dozen vials containing hazardous liquids at the site, which posed a potential threat to the surrounding community. Some vials had broken, leaking liquids into soil on site. In 1984, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). The State of New Jersey oversaw cleanup activities, including removal of about 200 cubic yards of contaminated soil and other materials and disposal of the soil and materials off site. Following cleanup, EPA verified that no contamination remained on site and deleted the site from the NPL in 1989. Today, the site is part of a residential housing development.
Updated 1/2013

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De Rewal Chemical Co. Green Infrastructure
Site photo

The De Rewal Chemical Co. Superfund site is about 8 acres and is located in Kingwood Township, New Jersey. From 1970 through 1973, De Rewal Chemical Company stored chemical wastes on site. Several chemical spills in 1973 led to soil contamination, and the company ceased operations. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Since initial cleanup activities began in 1990, EPA has removed 60,000 tons of contaminated soil. EPA also installed a ground water treatment system that treats 50,000 gallons of water per month. During cleanup activities at the site, EPA discovered 3,000 American Indian artifacts. EPA transferred all of the artifacts to Kingwood Township. The Kingwood Township Municipal Building now displays the artifacts for public viewing. The State of New Jersey obtained a conservation easement from the Township in January 2002. The conservation easement includes parts of the site in the Delaware River Greenway and restricts activities that might hinder public use of the open space. In November 2002, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) purchased a portion of the site to conserve it as open space. The community uses this space for passive recreational activities, such as dog walking, bird watching and bike riding. EPA completed remedy construction at the site in 2003.
Updated 1/2013

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Diamond Alkali Co.
Site photo

The Diamond Alkali Superfund site is located in Newark, New Jersey. The site includes the location of a former pesticide manufacturing plant, the surrounding properties at 80 and 120 Lister Avenue and a 17-mile tidal stretch of the Lower Passaic River and Newark Bay. Manufacturing operations occurred at the land part of the site for over 100 years under multiple companies. Businesses relied on the river and the bay as well during the industrial revolution. Over the years, dioxin, pesticides and other hazardous substances contaminated all three portions of the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. EPA, in partnership with state and federal agencies, the potentially responsible parties (PRPs) and a community advisory group (CAG), is addressing the site’s cleanup. The CAG includes members of the local community, environmental groups, residents, local businesses and municipalities. Completed and ongoing cleanup activities include large efforts in 2001 and 2012. In 2001, land cleanup included the capping of contaminated soil and debris, construction of a slurry wall and floodwall and ground water treatment. Cleanup activities in 2012 included removal and disposal of dioxin-contaminated sediments from the river and the ongoing removal and disposal of contaminated sediments at the surface of the river. Cleanups for the remainder of the river and the bay are still in the planning phases. The cooperative efforts of the government partners, the PRPs and the CAG have supported more than just the site cleanups. These efforts enabled local job creation and the designation of the Passaic River as an Urban Waters Federal Partnership project. As recipients of an EPA Urban Waters grant, Ironbound Community Corporation and the City of Newark are working together on riverfront tours, walkshops, boat tours and educational workshops. They have designed these projects to bring locals to the river to learn about its past, present and future. In 2012, the County of Essex and the City of Newark opened the first segment of Newark’s riverfront park with over 12 acres of athletic fields, playgrounds and walking paths. The second segment of Newark’s Riverfront Park opened in August 2013 as part of a riverfront festival. The park provides 4 acres of open space and features a bright orange boardwalk, a floating boat dock, a dancing pavilion, and walking and biking paths. The park also provides outdoor public space to help the community re-establish its connection to the Passaic River.
Updated 10/2013

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Federal Creosote

The Federal Creosote Superfund site occupies about 50 acres in a residential and commercial area in Manville, New Jersey. A coal tar wood treatment facility operated on site from 1911 to 1956. After operations ceased and the dismantling of the wood treatment facility, a developer purchased the site property and built the Claremont neighborhood development in the 1960s. This residential area included 137 single-family homes. The remaining 15 acres of the site became the Rustic Mall, a commercial shopping area. Investigations by EPA indicated that creosoting materials and contaminated soils associated with the wood treating facility had not been removed prior to the site’s redevelopment; EPA found high levels of contaminants on portions of the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1999. Site cleanup has addressed residential areas, soil contamination at the mall and site-wide ground water. Cleanup efforts addressed 93 residential properties, permanently relocated 24 property owners and demolished 18 homes to allow for the excavation of 277,000 tons of soil and other material for thermal treatment and disposal off site. Remedial workers also removed an additional 177,000 tons of contaminated soils for off-site treatment. A long-term ground water monitoring program and ground water use restrictions were also put in place. The site remedy is consistent with the future uses in Manville's Town Center redevelopment plans. To date, a developer has rebuilt 10 of the 18 demolished homes. Future redevelopment will include green space, additional housing and revitalized commercial space on the Rustic Mall portion of the site, which has been vacant since the construction of the remedy in 2008.
Updated 1/2013

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Glen Ridge Radium Site

The 130-acre Glen Ridge Radium Superfund site is located in Essex County in northeastern New Jersey. The site includes 430 residential properties and 14 municipal properties. In the early 1900s, radium processors disposed of radium-contaminated waste material, coal ash and trash at the site. These activities resulted in widespread radioactive soil contamination. In the 1920s, developers preparing the land for residential use mixed contaminated materials with clean soil and fill material to fill in low-lying areas. They also mixed contaminated materials with cement for sidewalks and foundations. In 1983, the State of New Jersey identified a number of homes on the site with high levels of radon gas, radon decay products, and indoor and outdoor gamma radiation. The contamination at the site is similar to that found at the nearby Montclair/West Orange Radium site, so EPA addressed the sites jointly. A 1983 emergency action involved the installation of temporary ventilation systems to reduce the radon concentrations in 38 homes, and the installation of gamma radiation shielding in 12 homes. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1985. In a 1990 Record of Decision (ROD), EPA selected a cleanup plan for the site’s contaminated soil. Cleanup activities included the phased excavation and off-site disposal of all radium-contaminated soil, followed by restoration of the properties. Cleanup work began in 1990 and ended in 2004. A site ground water investigation determined that no further action was necessary. EPA documented this finding in a 2005 ROD. Following the successful cleanup of the site, EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2009. The phased cleanup approach allowed EPA to address the severe contamination first while minimizing stress and community disruption from construction activities in any one specific residential area. The successful cleanup of the site allowed the continued use of several municipal parks and streets and allowed hundreds of residents to remain in their homes.
Updated 10/2013

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Higgins Farm

The 75-acre Higgins Farm Superfund site is located in Franklin Township, New Jersey. A waste disposal business operated on Laurel Avenue about one mile from the site. According to local residents, the waste disposal operator used Higgins Farm for the disposal of business wastes. During the 1960s, workers also used municipal sludge and penicillin wastes as fertilizers on the farm. In 1985, the Franklin Township Health Department conducted sampling of a nearby residential well and found high levels of chlorobenzene. Further investigations led to the discovery of a drum burial dump at the site, about 40 yards from the contaminated well. State site investigations in 1986 determined that site activities resulted in the contamination of soil and ground water with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, dioxins and metals. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup activities included the closure of affected wells, the connection of affected homes to public water and ground water treatment and monitoring. EPA’s cleanup plan enabled the continued use of the site throughout the cleanup process. Today, the Higgins family continues to operate a large portion of the site as a cattle farm.
Updated 10/2013

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Imperial Oil Co./Champion Chemicals

The Imperial Oil Co./Champion Chemicals site covers 15 acres in Morganville, New Jersey. Many industrial companies operated at the site for over 100 years, including Imperial Oil Company, an oil blending operation that leased site property from Champion Chemicals. Prior tenants produced arsenical pesticides, flavors and essences and reprocessed waste oil. Site operations and improper waste disposal practices, including use of the on-site fire pond, resulted in contaminated ground water and soils at the site. The EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) on September 8, 1983. The EPA and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) conducted immediate removals of contaminated filter clay, contaminated soils and buried drums. Remediation activities of impacted neighboring residential properties and the surrounding wetlands began in 1992. Additional cleanup actions included a floating oil extraction and treatment system, a run-off water treatment system and on-site building demolition. In 2008, the EPA conducted the demolition of the remaining six production and office buildings and 56 above ground storage tanks. Additionally, fencing surrounding the site’s perimeters and restricted well water areas have served to mitigate potential risks to human health. In 2009, approximately $33 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) provided the necessary financial aid to excavate approximately 185,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil, backfill with clean certified soil, remove free flowing product from the ground water surface and remediate the affected wetlands. Working with the NJDEP, the EPA created protected wetlands areas and two separate wildlife habitats for box turtles. The remediated wetlands now support the local box turtle population as well as other wildlife. Approximately 6-8 acres of the site is currently on the market as developable land for residential or commercial use.
Updated 5/2013

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Jackson Township Landfill
Site photo

The 135-acre Jackson Township Landfill Superfund site is located in Jackson Township, New Jersey. The site was originally a titanium ore-mining pit before the township began using it as a municipal landfill in 1972. The township used 20 acres of the area to dispose of liquid septic tank and coffee product waste until closing the landfill in 1980. In 1977, after residents complained of poor water quality, tests revealed contamination in the ground water. As a result, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) provided an alternate water supply for residents with contaminated wells in 1980. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in September 1983. The township conducted site and well investigations. The results showed that levels of contaminants in the ground water have been decreasing since the early 1980s. Therefore, EPA selected a long-term monitoring plan to ensure that the site does not pose a threat to the surrounding community. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in September 1995. Air and ground water monitoring is ongoing at the site. A local Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA) chartered club, the Ocean County Modelers club, uses a portion of the property as a flying field. Part of the property is currently in residential reuse.
Updated 1/2013

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Krysowaty Farm

The 1-acre Krysowaty Farm Superfund site in Hillsborough Township, New Jersey operated as a waste disposal area from 1965 until 1970. Site operators dumped, crushed and buried drums of paint and dye wastes at the site along with demolition debris, tires, automobiles, bulk wastes, solvents and waste sludge. In 1979, odors in well water spurred a site investigation, which found contamination in ground water, soil and debris at the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities at the site began in 1984 and included excavating and disposing of 500 drums and 13,700 cubic yards of contaminated soil and wastes; backfilling and covering the site with clean soil; and re-seeding with new vegetation. Additionally, the Township built a permanent alternate water supply for residents impacted by contaminated well water. EPA removed the site from the NPL in 1989. The site was in reuse as a garden center and nursery, but is now in reuse as a private residence.
Updated 1/2013

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Lightman Drum Company

The Lightman Drum Company Superfund site covers approximately 15 acres along Route 73 in Winslow Township, Camden County, New Jersey. In 1974 the Lightman Drum Company operated an industrial waste hauling and drum recycling business. In the late 1980s, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection found contaminated ground water and soil at the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List in October 1999. In 2007, a group of potentially responsible parties (PRPs) removed contaminated soils associated with a former underground storage tank. Additional PRP-lead soil removal activities took place during the fall of 2008. In 2009, EPA selected a remedy to address contaminated ground water. The remedy included an air sparging and soil vapor extraction system, a pump and treat system and monitored natural attenuation for the remainder of the plume. Further sampling in 2009 revealed a small additional area of soil contaminated with volatile organic compounds. EPA selected a remedy for the area in 2011 and completed the construction of the remedial components in 2013. Throughout these activities, United Cooperage operated a drum brokerage on an uncontaminated portion of the site. This business includes the storage of drums and tractor-trailers.
Updated 10/2013

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Lipari Landfill
Site photo

An area that once produced strong chemical odors and toxic contaminants has become a recreational centerpiece enjoyed by the community of Pitman, New Jersey, about 20 miles south of Philadelphia. From 1959 until 1971, the 16-acre Lipari Landfill Superfund site operated as a landfill, accepting industrial waste materials. Although the landfill closed in 1971, it continued to emit chemical odors and fumes, causing respiratory problems for some nearby residents and contaminating surface water, sediment, soil and air. In response, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in September 1983. EPA installed a security fence around the landfill, contained the landfill to prevent further contaminant migration and began large-scale cleanup activities. Cleanup activities included extraction and treatment of contaminated ground water on site and excavation and treatment of contaminated sediments from impacted wetland areas outside of the landfill. Additionally, EPA installed a pump system to remove and treat contamination in ground water. EPA worked to create partnerships among the Borough of Pitman, affected communities surrounding the site, the State of New Jersey and the potentially responsible party (PRP), enabling cleanup to proceed in a manner compatible with the local community’s plans. EPA and the PRP have cleaned up Alcyon Lake, a formerly contaminated area, and returned it to its former beauty. The lake reopened to the public in 1995. In 2000, EPA completed an on-site system to collect and treat the landfill’s toxic vapors. While additional cleanup activities at the landfill continue, the formerly contaminated surrounding area, now Alcyon Park, provides baseball fields, softball fields, a football field, two tournament-sized soccer fields, a picnic pavilion, bike path, concession stand, wildflower meadow, open play area, a nature trail, a paved and lighted parking lot and restored streams and marshes. Alcyon Lake and Alcyon Park offer a popular recreational area for local Pitman residents.
Updated 1/2013

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Maywood Chemical Co.

The Maywood Chemical Co. Superfund site includes portions of the Boroughs of Maywood, Lodi and Rochelle Park, New Jersey. The original Maywood Chemical Works began manufacturing a wide variety of chemical additives and products in 1895. From 1916 through 1955, the Maywood Chemical Company processed radioactive thorium ore on site. Site activities resulted in soil and ground water contamination that included radiological waste, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), metals and other hazardous substances. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983 and later selected a cleanup plan to address radiological site contamination. On-going cleanup activities include digging up and disposing of contaminated materials and putting land use restrictions in place. The potentially responsible party (PRP) will address non-radiological contamination at the site. The plan for the PRP’s soil cleanup is being finalized. After additional ground water investigations, EPA will select a cleanup plan for the remaining site contamination. EPA’s cleanup process has allowed the continued use of the site throughout investigation and cleanup efforts. The continued use of the site provides the community with valuable public services and amenities. Today, the Stepan Company manufactures specialty chemicals on the site. Additional site uses include 59 residential properties, 27 commercial and government properties and three state and federally owned properties. Local government land uses on site include three parks and a fire station.
Updated 10/2013

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Montclair/West Orange Radium Site

The 120-acre Montclair/West Orange Radium Superfund site is located in Essex County in northeastern New Jersey. The site includes 430 residential properties and 14 municipal properties. In the early 1900s, radium processors disposed of radium-contaminated waste material, coal ash and trash at the site. These activities resulted in widespread radioactive soil contamination. In the 1920s, developers preparing the land for residential use mixed contaminated materials with clean soil and fill material to fill in low-lying areas. They also mixed contaminated materials with cement for sidewalks and foundations. In 1983, the State of New Jersey identified a number of homes on the site with high levels of radon gas, radon decay products, and indoor and outdoor gamma radiation. The contamination at the site is similar to that found at the nearby Glen Ridge Radium site, so EPA addressed the sites jointly. A 1983 emergency action involved the installation of temporary ventilation systems to reduce the radon concentrations in 38 homes, and the installation of gamma radiation shielding in 12 homes. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1985. In a 1990 Record of Decision (ROD), EPA selected a cleanup plan for the site’s contaminated soil. Cleanup activities included the phased excavation and off-site disposal of all radium-contaminated soil, followed by restoration of the properties. Cleanup work began in 1990 and ended in 2004. A site ground water investigation determined that no further action was necessary. EPA documented this finding in a 2005 ROD. Following the successful cleanup of the site, EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2009. The phased cleanup approach allowed EPA to address the severe contamination first while minimizing stress and community disruption from construction activities in any one specific residential area. The successful cleanup of the site allowed the continued use of several municipal parks and streets and allowed hundreds of residents to remain in their homes.
Updated 10/2013

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Myers Property

The 5-acre Myers Property Superfund site is located in Franklin Township, New Jersey. Since the 1920s, numerous companies manufactured chemicals and pesticides on the property. Site activities resulted in the contamination of soil primarily with pesticides and metals, and the contamination of ground water with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticides. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Early cleanup activities included the removal of contaminated soil, drums and debris and the installation of a fence around contaminated areas. Additional cleanup activities included digging up contaminated soil, treating and monitoring ground water, and cleaning up contaminated buildings. Today, the site is vacant except for the ground water treatment system. However, the successful cleanup of the site enabled the beneficial reuse of part of the property. A privately owned portion of the site is fenced and a state-owned recreational trail that runs through the site is open for public use.
Updated 10/2013

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Pepe Field
Site location map

E.F. Drew Company used the 3-acre Pepe Field Superfund site in Boonton, New Jersey as a landfill for almost 30 years. From the 1920s until 1950, the company disposed of unknown quantities of processing waste from the manufacture of edible oils and cleaning products for household and industrial use. The site remained vacant until the Town of Boonton purchased the property in the mid-1960s for recreational purposes. The town covered the site with soil and built recreational amenities. However, because of the biological decay of waste material beneath the field, strong toxic odors affected the site. In 1969, the town implemented an odor abatement plan for the site, and closed the recreational facility for many years. In 1983, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) and began cleanup activities at the site. These activities included leachate collection and treatment, stabilization and excavation of wastes, installation of a cover, installation of a landfill gas collection and treatment system, and monitoring of the ground water. The cleanup activities also included measures to restore the recreational amenities of the park. The on-site recreational facility, restored and reopened in 2000, includes a little league field, walking paths, a playground, a basketball court, gazebo and concession stand. EPA also transferred ownership of an adjacent residential property from the federal government to the Town of Boonton for use in conjunction with the park. In 2003, EPA deleted the site from the NPL. Today, the site, formerly a city eyesore, provides field space for residents of Boonton to enjoy baseball.
Updated 1/2013

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Pijak Farm

The Pijak Farm Superfund site occupies approximately 87 acres in Plumstead Township, New Jersey. From 1963 to 1970, a specialty and research chemicals disposal facility dumped drums and free-flowing liquids into a natural ditch at the site and then covered the ditch with soil. EPA identified contamination in ground water, which the surrounding community used for drinking water, as well as for crop irrigation and stock watering in surrounding agricultural areas. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included the removal of 4,000 cubic yards of waste material and contaminated soil with off-site disposal. Ground water monitoring demonstrated that the cleanup activities had addressed contamination at the site. Therefore, in 1997, EPA deleted the site from the NPL. Today, a small portion of the site has undergone residential development.
Updated 1/2013

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PJP Landfill

The 87-acre PJP Landfill Superfund site in Jersey City, New Jersey originally included an area of salt meadows. In 1932, local parties condemned a portion of the site for the construction of the Pulaski Skyway. The PJP Landfill Company operated a commercial landfill at the site, accepting chemical and industrial waste from about 1970 to 1974. From 1970 to 1985, subsurface fires, attributed to spontaneous combustion of subsurface drums and decomposition of landfill materials, frequently burned on a 45-acre portion of the site, emitting large amounts of smoke. In 1982, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) extinguished these subsurface fires and capped a 45-acre area of the site in 1985 and 1986. Cleanup activities also included excavation and re-compaction of about 1,033,000 cubic yards of material and the removal of soil, cylinders and drums containing hazardous materials. NJDEP installed a gas venting system and a firebreak trench and re-seeded the capped area. In 1995, the site underwent several additional cleanup activities, including additional excavations, installation of drainage ditches and gas venting systems, and implementation of a wetlands assessment and restoration plan. In March 2008, AMB Corporation purchased a portion of the site and began construction of a warehouse and transfer station. AMB expects to finish construction in 2014. Additionally, in June 2010, Jersey City signed an agreement with Waste Management, which was responsible for the remainder of the landfill, to take over its portion of the property after Waste Management constructed a landfill cap. Waste Management completed the cap in early 2012. Jersey City took over all responsibility for the property in May 2012 and is working on construction of a park.
Updated 1/2013

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Price Landfill

The 26-acre Price Landfill Superfund site is located in the City of Pleasantville and Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey. The original business at the property, a sand and gravel excavation operation, shut down in 1968. In 1971, the site began accepting industrial chemicals, sludges, oil, grease, septic tank and sewer wastes as a commercial landfill, named Price Landfill. Chemical waste disposal, sludge disposal and municipal waste disposal all ended by 1976. In 1980, the discovery of contamination in nearby residential wells prompted an immediate response and EPA provided local residents with clean drinking water until they could connect to the public water system. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in September 1983. From 1983 to 1985, the State replaced and relocated the Atlantic City water supply well field and facilities. In 1986, EPA selected a cleanup for the site that included a security fence around the landfill, shallow and deep ground water extraction wells, ground water and leachate pretreatment facilities. The cleanup also included piping to carry treated ground water to the Atlantic County Utilities Authority (ACUA) interceptor system, ground water monitoring and a cap over the landfill area after ground water cleanup ended. In 1999, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) completed a design of a pilot study that evaluated the use of a particular treatment technology to treat and discharge ground water. NJDEP completed construction of the pilot study treatment plant in February 2001. In 2009, the site received American Resource and Recovery Act (ARRA) funding, which helped fund the construction of the final ground water treatment facilities. The pilot plant operated until early 2012. The construction of a full-scale groundwater treatment plant is expected to be completed in December 2012. EPA also excavated waste material associated with Price Landfill historical operations from a property located directly south of the site. The business located on this property temporarily relocated until the remedial contractor completed the excavation and on-site consolidation effort, and then resumed operations on the cleaned up property. The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is also evaluating whether a renewable energy project would be viable on the landfill once construction of the cap is complete. The local utility company maintains power lines that transect the site and a substation adjacent to it, which could potentially support a solar energy project. EPA and site stakeholders will continue to work together to evaluate the potential for beneficial reuse of the site.
Updated 1/2013

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Ringwood Mines/Landfill Green Infrastructure
Site photo

The Ringwood Mines/Landfill Superfund site in Ringwood Borough, New Jersey, includes 500 acres of historic iron ore mines. From the 1700s until the early 1900s, mining operations took place at the site. Beginning in the 1960s, Ford Motor Company’s Mahwah facility used the site as a disposal area for paint sludge and other waste. EPA identified widespread contamination in soil and ground water, prompting the Agency to add the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. After the completion of cleanup activities, EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1994. After the site’s deletion from the NPL, remedial workers discovered additional contamination at the site, prompting EPA to restore the site to the NPL in 2006. Since 2004, cleanup activities have included removal of additional landfilled paint sludge and contaminated soil from the site. Today, an industrial refuse disposal area, a municipal recycling center, the Ringwood Borough garage, a state park with rugged forest and open vegetated areas, and 50 private homes are located on site. Investigation and cleanup activities continue at the site.
Updated 1/2013

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Roebling Steel Co.

The 200-acre Roebling Steel Co. Superfund site is located next to the Delaware River in Florence Township, New Jersey. Site operators manufactured steel wire and cable products until the 1980s. In later years, various industrial facilities operated on portions of the site. Site operators stored and buried raw materials and waste products on site, contaminating sediment, ground water and soil. EPA added the site the National Priorities List (NPL) in September 1983. Cleanup activities have included removing contaminated materials, demolishing on-site buildings and restoration of the shoreline. Funding from a Superfund Redevelopment pilot grant enabled Burlington County to develop a reuse plan for the site compatible with the cleanup activities. The plan identified several community priorities, including new commercial and industrial development as well as historic preservation. New Jersey Transit leased a portion of the site for the construction of a light rail commuter station stop and parking lot in 2005. EPA received $27 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds in 2009 for removal of contaminated creek and river sediment and restoration of the impacted wetlands. Creek sediment dredging and restoration is near completion and dredging river sediments is underway. Restoration of the historic Main Gate House, completed in 2009, transformed the former gateway to the Roebling Mill into part of the Roebling Museum. The museum provides 7,000 square feet of exhibit space documenting the community’s rich social and industrial history.
Updated 1/2013

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Spence Farm

The Spence Farm Superfund site occupies 83 acres in Plumstead Township, New Jersey. From the 1950s to the 1970s, disposal activities including dumping of hazardous wastes in drums, bulk and free-flowing liquid form took place on 20 acres of wooded and low-lying areas of the site. Disposal activities scattered laboratory wastes in drums at the site and several drums leaked their contents. These activities resulted in contamination of ground water, soil and sediment. As a result, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup of the site required the removal of all drums and laboratory wastes as well as excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated soil. Remedial workers removed a total of about 4,360 cubic yards of waste material and soil from the site. Ground water monitoring demonstrated that the cleanup activities had addressed contamination at the site. Therefore, in 1997, EPA deleted the site from the NPL. Today, farming activities continue on site.
Updated 1/2013

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Universal Oil Products (Chemical Division)

The 75-acre Universal Oil Products (Chemical Division) Superfund site is located in the urban industrial Borough of East Rutherford, Bergen County, New Jersey. Beginning in 1932, a chemical laboratory operated on the site and later expanded to handle chemical wastes and solvent recovery operations. Operations created two wastewater lagoons that Universal Oil Products (UOP) continued to use after the company bought the property and facilities in 1960. UOP stopped using the lagoons in 1971 and sitewide operations ceased in 1979. Years of operations, the handling of raw materials and the wastewater lagoons resulted in contamination of soils and ground water. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. A potentially responsible party conducted investigations, which led to the removal of contaminated materials from the wastewater lagoons. EPA split the site into two operable units (OUs) to conduct cleanup actions. Remedial investigations are ongoing for OU2, which includes sediments, wetlands and lagoons, but remedial crews have completed the cleanup actions for OU1. OU1 cleanup activities included soil removal and off-site disposal, on-site treatment and covered containment of contaminated soil, leachate collection and treatment, and implementation of institutional controls. With OU1 actions complete, the site is now in productive use. The site, zoned for commercial and industrial development, includes six areas (Areas 1, 1A, 2, 3, 4 and 5). Development of Area 2 in 2005 included a Lowe’s home center, a restaurant and a strip mall. In 2008, the New Jersey Transit Corporation constructed an extension of the New Jersey Pascack Valley Transit Line, which allows visitors to access the nearby Meadowlands Sports Complex and utilizes a portion of the site property. EPA will continue to work with site stakeholders and interested developers to complete the site’s cleanup and to promote productive and safe reuse.
Updated 1/2013

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Vineland State School

The New Jersey Department of Human Services (NJDHS) runs the Vineland State School in a suburban residential area of Vineland, New Jersey on the 195-acre Vineland State School Superfund site. The property formerly included an unregulated incinerator and landfill area associated with operations of an on-site residential, educational and therapeutic facility for persons with intellectual, development and behavioral challenges. Site operators used incineration and landfilling to dispose of hazardous chemicals, pesticides and transformer oil in pits and ponds on site. The state investigated several spills at the site, identifying soil and ground water contamination. In 1983, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA, the state and NJDHS worked together to develop a cleanup plan which allowed NJDHS to continue to care for its patients without interruption during and after the cleanup. Cleanup activities included removal of contaminated soil, placement of a protective soil cover over a portion of the site and extension of the public water supply. Following completion of cleanup activities at the site, EPA deleted the site from the NPL. The Vineland State School, now the Elwyn New Jersey campus, continues to provide community-based work and adult day programs, outsourcing solutions to regional businesses and employers, community living programs and other services for adults with disabilities in southern New Jersey.
Updated 1/2013

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W.R. Grace & Co., Inc./Wayne Interim Storage Site (USDOE)

The 6.5-acre W.R. Grace & Co., Inc./Wayne Interim Storage site (USDOE) Superfund site is located in Wayne Township, New Jersey. Rare Earths Incorporated began operating on the site in 1948 and specialized in the extraction of thorium and other rare earths from monazite ore. Rare Earths Incorporated continued these efforts until 1957, when W.R. Grace & Co. took ownership of the facility and continued similar extraction operations until 1971. W.R. Grace & Co. continued to store radioactive materials on the property until 1974, when the firm decontaminated the property by burying all contaminated material. In 1975, the company released the land for unrestricted use, though the deed indicated the presence of subsurface radioactive material. In 1980, an aerial survey showed elevated radiation levels at the plant site and on surrounding developed properties. In 1984, the federal government acquired the property and EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) that same year. Cleanup activities included excavation and disposal of contaminated soil and materials, extraction and treatment of contaminated ground water, and implementation of a monitoring program. In 2006, after completion of soil cleanup efforts, the federal government transferred the property to Wayne Township for recreational use through the National Park Service Land to Parks Program. Brett Sherman, a former Wayne Township resident and executor of his neighbor’s estate, recognized the property’s potential to be a recreational asset to the local community. He sought out Township officials involved in the redevelopment plans at the site and, through the Vanguard Charitable Endowment Program, donated $350,000 in July 2011 toward the development of a dog park and playground.
Updated 1/2013

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Welsbach & General Gas Mantle (Camden Radiation)

The Welsbach & General Gas Mantle (Camden Radiation) Superfund site is located in Camden and Gloucester City, New Jersey. The Welsbach Company and the General Gas Mantle Company produced gas mantles at the site from the late 1890s until 1941. The companies used thorium, a radionuclide that emits gamma radiation during radioactive decay, as a constituent in their manufacturing process. In the early 1990s, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) investigated over 1,100 properties in Camden and Gloucester City, New Jersey, for radiological contamination. In addition to radiation found at the site, NJDEP also found elevated levels of gamma radiation in many nearby residential areas. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1996. In 1999, EPA selected a remedy and began cleanup activities, including massive excavations, off-site disposal of radiologically contaminated soil and waste materials from both residential and industrial properties in Camden and Gloucester City, and demolition and off-site disposal of the General Gas Mantle facility in Camden. In 2009, EPA received $22 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds. Funding supported cleanup of the contaminated soils around the former General Gas Mantle facility in Camden. The South Camden Theatre Company, a not-for-profit theatre located in Camden, New Jersey, in association with Heart of Camden, a not-for-profit redevelopment organization, broke ground in 2008 on a new 4,000 square foot, 99-seat theatre on a remediated portion of the Welsbach site. The Waterfront South Theatre, which opened its doors in September 2010, creates a space for theatre, music and art in downtown Camden. The South Camden Theatre Company as well as local high school and elementary school programs use the theatre. The local groups worked with EPA throughout the development and construction of the Waterfront South Theatre. While cleanup continues on some areas of the site, redevelopment efforts on remediated portions of the site have helped restore neighborhoods and other community assets. These efforts have recently included the successful restoration of the William Flynn Veterans Sports Complex, which includes three baseball fields, a football practice field and parking area. The community celebrated the return of this recreational resource with a 2011 grand reopening.
Updated 1/2013

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White Chemical Corp.

The White Chemical Corporation (WCC) Superfund site, a 4.4-acre parcel of property located in a heavily populated and industrialized part of Newark, New Jersey, formerly operated as an acid chlorides and flame retardant compounds manufacturing facility. WCC leased the property from 1983 until October 1990, when an EPA issued Unilateral Administrative Order (UAO) and required that WCC cease operations. In 1991, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) and EPA found thousands of 55-gallon drums and other containers of hazardous substances improperly stored and in various stages of deterioration. NJDEP, and later EPA, removed drums, containers and tanks from the site by 1993. EPA selected the City of Newark, New Jersey, for a Superfund Redevelopment Pilot grant in 2000. The City of Newark used the grant funds to determine the best reuse of the site. The site lies within the Airport Support Zone, a 75-acre area next to Newark International Airport, making it prime real estate for redevelopment. The City of Newark plans to provide cleanup and reuse information to the community to encourage its participation in the reuse process. The Newark Economic Development Corporation and the local community collaborated to develop a draft reuse plan in 2003. The plan has undergone modifications to include the larger Newark Airport Support Zone. The City of Newark continues redevelopment discussions as EPA begins cleanup activities at the Site.
Updated 1/2013

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