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Sites in Reuse in Pennsylvania

A.I.W. Frank/Mid-County Mustang

The 16-acre A.I.W. Frank/Mid-County Mustang site is located in Exton, Pennsylvania. The site includes two properties: the 15-acre A.I.W. Frank property and the 1-acre Mid-County Mustang property. From 1962 until 1981, manufacturing of Styrofoam cups and plates took place on the A.I.W. Frank property. In 1981, Continental Refrigerator Corporation acquired the A.I.W. Frank property. The firm manufactured refrigerators, freezers and warming cabinets for the institutional food service industry. Since the 1940s, auto repair facilities and body shops have operated Mid-County Mustang property. Use of solvents and degreasers has resulted in contamination of ground water wells and surface water. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. In 2000, extraction and treatment of ground water began and EPA connected nearby residents to the public water supply. The owner of the A.I.W. Frank property has demolished and removed an on-site building. Currently, grass and remaining concrete cover the vacant property. An automotive services business continues to operate an auto garage on the Mid-County Mustang property. The Mid-County Mustang property also includes a parking lot, two rental homes and a small lawn area.
Updated 2/2013

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American Street Tannery

Several tanneries operated on one city block within the Northern Liberties neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania until 1986. Facility operations led to the area’s contamination with pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and metals. Contamination resulted in designation of one of the tanneries, located between George, Bodine, American and Widley Streets, as the American Street Tannery site. EPA conducted two removal actions at the site. In 1987, EPA removed 750 drums, hundreds of laboratory chemical containers, 23 sludge containers, and crushed drums from the land and buildings on the site. In 1990, EPA addressed PCBs spilled at the site following a fire. Following the completion of cleanup activities, Tower Development purchased the site and began redevelopment under the PA Act 2 Program. Liberty Homes Philadelphia Inc. currently owns the site property and operates a residential condominium and commercial mixed use complex. EPA has completed additional sampling of soil and ground water to ensure the safety of the site for reuse.
Updated 2/2013

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Austin Avenue Radiation Site
Site photo

The Austin Avenue Radiation site is located in Lansdowne Borough, East Lansdowne Borough, Upper Darby Township, Aldan Borough, Yeadon Borough and Darby Borough, Pennsylvania. The site consists of 40 privately-owned properties. W.L. Cummings Radium Processing Company conducted radium refining operations at the site from 1915 to 1925. These operations generated radioactive wastes and waste disposal practices resulted in the contamination of residential properties. Site operators mixed radium tailings materials to construct buildings or used the mixture for fill material at the 40 properties. Contaminants present in the structures presented significant health risks and EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1992. Cleanup activities at the site included the removal of materials contaminated with radioactive waste, demolition of contaminated houses, permanent relocation of residents from eight of the demolished homes, removal of contaminated soils on 21 different properties, and reconstruction of 11 houses. EPA completed cleanup activities in 1998 and returned properties to their respective owners. Private residential use continues at 11 properties. Several owners of private residences chose permanent relocation; the respective municipalities acquired these properties for public use. A private developer constructed new homes on three properties. In 2002, EPA deleted the site from the NPL. Currently, an auto sales business is operating on the lot of the former warehouse property at 36 South Union Avenue.
Updated 2/2013

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Avco Lycoming

The 28-acre Avco Lycoming (Williamsport Division) site, located in Williamsport, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, has housed manufacturing facilities since the early 1900s. Manufacturing operations have included a bicycle and sewing machine facility, a sandpaper plant, a tool and die shop and a silk plant. In the 1920s, Avco Corporation began operations at the site, which continue today. A petroleum solvent reclamation facility and a waste treatment facility have also operated at the site since the early 1950s. Manufacturing and waste disposal activities have resulted in contamination in ground water at on-site wells, off-site down gradient wells, and a well field 3,000 feet southwest of the site. Contamination also affected shallow ground water beneath the facility on site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Ground water extraction and treatment systems continue to operate on site and off site. Lycoming Engines, a division of Avco Corporation and a wholly-owned subsidiary of Textron, Inc., continues operations at the site, primarily manufacturing and repairing aircraft engines.
Updated 2/2013

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Bally Ground Water Contamination

The 20-acre Bally Ground Water Contamination site surrounds the former Bally Engineered Structures (BES) plant in Bally, Pennsylvania. From 1972 to 1995, BES manufactured insulated panels for refrigeration on the site. The company’s predecessor, Bally Case and Cooler, Co., disposed of solvent wastes in on-site lagoons. The aquifer under the site supplies drinking water to residents of the Borough of Bally and Washington Township. In 1982, a water quality inspection identified ground water contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. Under EPA’s oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) conducted cleanup activities, including pumping and treating ground water, air stripping and long-term site monitoring. In 2003, site investigations identified additional ground water contamination. The PRPs completed cleanup activities to address contamination, including constructing a new municipal supply well and connecting it to the water supply in 2010. Various tenants occupy the facility on site. These tenants conduct light manufacturing, shipping and receiving, self-storage and office work activities. EPA and the PRPs have assessed vapor intrusion into the facility on site. The PRPs installed a vapor intrusion mitigation system at the facility and long-term indoor air monitoring is ongoing.
Updated 2/2013

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Berkley Products Co. Dump

The Berkley Products Co. Dump site occupies five acres on a 21-acre area of land in Denver, Pennsylvania. From the 1930s until 1965, a privately owned municipal waste landfill operated at the site and accepted municipal wastes. Site operators burned or buried municipal wastes on site. In 1965, Lipton Paint and Varnish Co., a subsidiary of Berkley Products Co., bought the site. The firm used the site to bury municipal waste along with some organic solvents, paint wastes, resins and pigment sludge. When operations ceased in 1970, site operators covered the site with soil, seeded the site and sold the property parcel. EPA identified plastic production wastes, including phthalates, in ground water, soil and leachate. Additional investigations found contamination from heavy metals, including barium, lead and mercury. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Site cleanup activities included the installation of a landfill cap and monitoring wells to ensure the safety of ground water wells used by nearby residences. EPA removed the site from the NPL in 2007, but long-term monitoring continues at the site. Private owners continue to use a portion of the site for residential purposes.
Updated 2/2013

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Berks Landfill Green Infrastructure

The Berks Landfill site is located in Spring Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania, approximately seven miles southwest of the City of Reading. From the 1950s to the 1980s, the site operated as a municipal landfill facility with two major landfills: a 47-acre eastern landfill and a 19-acre western landfill. Operations ended in 1986 and site operators closed the landfills with a soil cap. Site investigations identified ground water contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Under EPA oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) conducted cleanup activities at the site in 2000. Cleanup included repair of the leachate collection system, relining of three leachate ponds, repair of the eastern landfill soil cover, installation of a sentinel well and gas monitoring probes, planting trees and wetland vegetation, and construction of access roads. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2008. Long-term monitoring of the landfills and ground water continues. Open green space, trees and vegetation cover the landfills on site. The current property owner uses on-site structures for storage.
Updated 2/2013

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Berks Sand Pit

The 4-acre Berks Sand Pit is located in in Longswamp Township, Pennsylvania. The site consists of a contaminated ground water plume that at one time impacted 30 residences. Emergency response and EPA follow-up efforts did not identify the source of contamination detected in ground water. Contamination identified in ground water at the site included volatile organic compounds (VOCs) typically found in solvents and degreasers. Contamination threatened the bedrock aquifer as well as the Middle Branch of the Perkiomen Creek. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup activities have included pumping and treating contaminated ground water and temporarily connecting four impacted residences to an alternate water supply for area residents until ground water reached safe drinking water standards. Monitoring of residential wells and streams near the site is ongoing and residential land use continues at the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Boyle Galvanizing Alternative Energy
Site photo

The Boyle Galvanizing site is located on a 1-acre plot in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. When the steel galvanizing factory on the site closed, contaminated soil remained at the site. EPA conducted a removal action at the site in 1995 to address this contamination. Cleanup activities included excavating the contaminated soil and backfilling the site with clean soil. A local entrepreneur purchased the property in 1998 and cultivated an urban garden called Greensgrow Farm. As of 2012, the farm has grown to include a plant nursery, farm stand, a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program, beehives, chickens and a pig. Greensgrow Farm offers cooking classes and a food safety-training program. The farm recycles vegetable oil from its restaurant clientele to produce its own biodiesel. The site and the Greensgrow Farm exist as a model for the development of small agricultural enterprises in low income, urban areas.
Updated 2/2013

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Brodhead Creek

From 1888 until 1944, a coal gasification plant operated at the 12-acre Brodhead Creek site in the Borough of Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania. The plant, which operated along the west bank of Brodhead Creek, produced coal tar wastes containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during its operation. Site operators placed coal tar wastes in an on-site open pit. Waste disposal practices resulted in the contamination of ground water, soil and creek sediment at the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included the use of an underground slurry wall to contain the coal tar wastes and a ground water extraction and treatment system. These activities removed over 2,000 gallons of coal tar before site-specific constraints, including a flood control levee and on-site wetlands, deemed the activities technically unworkable. Institutional controls restrict use of ground water at the site and prohibit excavation without prior written approval. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2001. A sewage treatment plant and the Stroudsburg Gas Company continue operations on portions of the site classified as utility areas.
Updated 2/2013

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Brown's Battery Breaking
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The 14-acre Brown’s Battery Breaking site is an abandoned battery recycling facility located in Hamburg, Pennsylvania. The facility operated from 1961 to 1971. Three families lived on-site when the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania discovered high levels of lead in children living in residences at the site. EPA identified ground water, surface water and soil contaminated with lead and related metals from former site operations. In 1983, EPA temporarily relocated on-site residents. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. After additional site investigations, EPA permanently relocated residents and an on-site business in 1993. Cleanup activities included the excavation and treatment of contaminated soil, removal of contaminated battery casings, and treatment of contaminated ground water. Currently, a landscaping business leases a building on site for use as office space.
Updated 2/2013

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Butler Mine Tunnel

Constructed in the 1930s, the Butler Mine Tunnel site is located in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. The site serves as a collection and discharge point for mine drainage from an estimated five-square-mile area of underground coal mines. Parties disposed of hazardous materials in underground mine areas connected to the tunnel, which discharges directly to the Susquehanna River. In 1979, an oily discharge coming from the tunnel created an oil slick on the river. Investigations traced the contamination back to illegal dumping of hazardous chemicals into a bore hole that drained to the Butler Mine system. Sampling identified contamination in ground water and surface water. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. Cleanup activities for the site included the construction of access roads and anchors along the Susquehanna River’s edge and pre-purchasing materials for responding to potential future flushouts of the mine system. Continuous monitoring of the tunnel is ongoing and flushout-response system deployments for actual or potential future flushouts are in place. A highway auto repair and service center continues to operate on site, above the site’s underground features.
Updated 2/2013

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Butz Landfill
Site photo

The Butz Landfill site occupies about 13 acres in rural Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania. An 8.5-acre municipal dump formerly operated at the site. Unpermitted landfill operations resulted in ground water contaminated with solvents and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Residents near the site used ground water wells as a drinking water source. In 1982, EPA installed a water line to connect nearby residents to the public water supply. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. EPA installed a ground water extraction and treatment system at the site in 2001. In 2007, 2008, 2011 and 2012, EPA assessed vapor intrusion into homes near the site and determined that vapor intrusion does not pose an immediate threat. The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection took over operation and maintenance at the site in 2011. Also in 2011, a site owner began storing and recycling soil on a portion of the site.
Updated 2/2013

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C & D Recycling Green Infrastructure
Site photo

The 45-acre C & D Recycling site is located in Foster Township, Pennsylvania. From the 1960s to early 1980s, a metal-reclamation plant operated at the site. The plant incinerated lead and plastic-cased telephone cables or burned cables in pits, in order to melt off the plastic and reclaim the remaining copper wire. Operations included mechanically stripping plastic coverings before incineration and storing the coverings in piles on site. Site investigations identified high concentrations of heavy metals in soil and sediment, both on site and off site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. Cleanup activities included the removal, stabilization and off-site disposal of 90,000 tons of contaminated soil and sediment. Under EPA oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) demolished site infrastructure and removed remaining wastes and over 1,000 tons of cable casings from the site. The PRPs put erosion control measures in place and revegetated the site. The PRPs completed cleanup construction at the site in 1999. A private party purchased the site and deeded the property as a nature conservancy trust for open space. Cleanup and restoration activities have restored the site to its natural state.
Updated 2/2013

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Centre County Kepone
Site photo

The 32-acre Centre County Kepone site is located in State College, Pennsylvania. The chemical manufacturing facility on site produced pesticides between 1958 and 1974. Rutgers Organics Corporation (ROC) closed the chemical manufacturing facility in 2004. For nearly 20 years after operations began at the site, the site operator disposed of wastewater and sludge in drums and lagoons on site. Site investigations found that hazardous materials had leaked from the lagoons. Theses leaking materials contaminated ground water, soil, surface water and drainage ditch sediments. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Completed in 1999, cleanup activities included putting in a ground water treatment system; upgrades to surface water management controls; and removal and disposal of contaminated soil, sediment and waste materials. In 1998, a developer constructing a shopping center next to the ROC property cleaned up and redeveloped part of the drainage ditch into a storm drainage system, a sidewalk and a vehicle access lane under an EPA order. After EPA changed the site’s cleanup plan in 2003, ROC put in an enhanced soil vapor removal system to remove contaminants from subsurface soil at the site. EPA deleted an 8-acre area of the site referred to as the “Administration Parcel” from the NPL in 2004. This deleted area includes the ROC administration building, a parking lot and open areas. Currently, a roofing company uses a portion of the site as a storage and sales facility. The Pittsburgh Superstars, a cheerleading and dance company, opened a training center and dance studio on a portion of the site as well. Interim uses are underway at the site while ROC explores long-term redevelopment options for the property. ROC also completed cleanup of the Redevelopment Parcel area of the site in 2011. Ground water treatment and monitoring are ongoing. EPA is currently overseeing ROC’s vapor intrusion investigations at the site.
Updated 6/2014

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Craig Farm Drum Green Infrastructure

The Craig Farm site occupies 117 acres of land in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. Between 1958 and 1963, the Koppers Chemical Plant located in Petrolia, Pennsylvania deposited approximately 8,000 tons of drummed waste material from its production operations in two former strip mine pits at the site and covered the materials with topsoil. Waste disposal resulted in the contamination of ground water and soil at the site, as well as a nearby unnamed creek. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. The site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) conducted cleanup activities under EPA’s oversight. These activities included the excavation, solidification and placement of 8,200 tons of treated waste and 21,000 tons of contaminated soil into a 2-acre, double-lined landfill on site. The PRP then capped the landfill, covered it with soil, and seeded and fenced the area. The PRP also installed a seep interceptor system to collect contaminated water in an on-site storage tank for transport to an off-site wastewater treatment facility. The PRP constructed a 1-acre wetlands area at the site. In 2010, the PRP installed a cap over a portion of the site to reduce ground water discharges into the seep interceptor system. Ground water and surface water monitoring continue at the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Crater Resources Inc./Keystone Coke Co./Alan Wood Steel Co.
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The Crater Resources, Inc./Keystone Coke Co./Alan Wood Steel Co. site is located in Upper Merion Township, Pennsylvania. The site consists of four inactive quarries on a 95-acre parcel of land. Beginning in 1919, Alan Wood Steel Company disposed of wastes generated by its coking facility in Swedeland, Pennsylvania into three of the quarries at the site. In 1977, Keystone Coke Company purchased Alan Wood Steel Company. The firm continued to dispose of wastes at the site until 1980, when all operations at the facility ceased. Site investigations identified wastes, liquids, soil and sediment containing contamination within the quarries. Ground water at the site also contained contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1992. Cleanup activities at the site require removal of contaminated soil and sediment as well as construction of multi-layer caps. Crater Resources, Inc.; Each Parcel As Is, Inc.; Out Parcel, Inc., Liberty; RLA and RAGM Settlement Corporation own portions of the site within Renaissance Park, a commercial office park. Gulph Mils Golf Club also owns a portion of the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Crossley Farm
Site photo

The 24-acre Crossley Farm Superfund site sits atop Blackhead Hill in Hereford Township, Pennsylvania. The property has served as farm since 1927. From the mid-1960s to the mid-1970s, the Bally Case and Cooler Co. plant sent numerous drums containing liquid waste to Crossley Farm for disposal. A 1983 investigation conducted by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources found hazardous chemicals in residential wells near the site. In 1992, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). In conjunction with the state, EPA developed a cleanup plan that allowed the dairy farm to stay open during site remediation. The state issued an initial health advisory for the use of contaminated wells. The state also provided water to residents who depended on the wells. In 2000, EPA installed point-of-entry carbon filtration systems to remove contaminants from drinking water at 55 area residences. In 1995, cleanup activities included removal of contaminated soil and over 1,000 buried drums from the site. In 2009, the site received $6.5 million in American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) funds to begin construction of the ground water treatment system. Area residents and local government representatives celebrated the completion of a $10 million water treatment facility July 2012. With the facility completed, EPA will focus future cleanup efforts on ground water contamination. Crossley Farm remained in operation during the cleanup and has continued to operate as a farm.
Updated 2/2013

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Croydon TCE

The Croydon TCE site encompasses a 4-square-mile residential area between Croydon and Bristol Townships in Pennsylvania. The site also hosts several industrial complexes and small businesses. A 1985 investigation of an industrial plant adjacent to the site revealed a plume of ground water contamination originating from the site. EPA detected chemical components of solvents and degreasers in ground water and in eight residential wells. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. EPA connected residences impacted by ground water contamination to the Borough of Bristol Water and Sewage Department water supply. In 1995, EPA installed a ground water extraction and treatment system to address ground water contamination at the site. The system operated until 2009, when it was turned off for an on-going monitored natural attenuation (MNA) evaluation. In 2008, as part of an initial step in evaluating the potential for vapor intrusion (VI), EPA conducted sampling of shallow ground water in a residential area previously impacted by site contamination. The sampling results indicated that low levels of contamination in the area did not warrant any further VI sampling. EPA and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania continue to conduct long-term ground water monitoring. Residential, commercial and industrial land use continues at the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Cryochem, Inc.

The 19-acre Cryochem, Inc. site is located in Worman Township, Pennsylvania. The site has operated as a metals fabrication facility since 1962 and includes several production and storage buildings and an office complex. Site operators used solvents to clean finished metal parts and placed excess solvents in the shop drain system. This drain system discharged into nearby surface waters. Nearby residents depend on ground water as a drinking water supply. A site investigation found contaminants in an on-site production well and in nearby residential wells. Following the investigation, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Ground water treatment consists of extraction, treatment by air stripping and discharge to surface water. Area residences use regularly maintained carbon filtration systems on private wells. Currently, Apex Fabrication & Design, Inc. leases the property and continues to operate a metal fabrication facility on the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Dorney Road Landfill Green Infrastructure

The 27-acre Dorney Road Landfill site is located in Upper Macungie Township in Lehigh County. A small portion of the site extends into Longswamp Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania. The site first operated as an open-pit iron mine. From 1966 until 1978, the site operated as a municipal and industrial landfill that received wastes including industrial sludge, batteries and petroleum products. Site investigations detected contaminants in leachate and ground water. Soil at the site also contained contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup activities included construction of a multilayer landfill cap and installation of a passive gas vapor venting system. Additional activities included regrading, construction of a permanent drainage system for storm water control and wetland mitigation. Since initial planting, the wetlands have developed into quality habitat for a variety wildlife species.
Updated 2/2013

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Douglassville Disposal
Site photo

The 52-acre Douglassville Disposal site in Douglassville, Pennsylvania, operated as a waste oil recycling facility from 1941 to 1986. Beginning in 1941, site operators kept waste oil sludge in on-site lagoons. The contents of these lagoons washed into the Schuylkill River during flooding in 1970 and 1972. Additionally, site operators landfarmed sludge generated in the oil recycling process at the site. The operators stored approximately 700 drums, many leaking, at the site from 1979 until 1982. Site investigations detected contaminants in on-site ground water, surface water, soil and river sediments. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included dismantling the on-site tank farm and processing equipment as well as constructing a soil cap over the former waste lagoon and the landfarm areas in the northern portion of the site. Cleanup activities use lime-based stabilization technology to treat the oily filter cake wastes remaining at the site. Ground water monitoring continues to at the site. Currently, the site provides space for recreational activities including hiking, biking and hunting. The Schuylkill River Greenway Association has also extended its Schuylkill River Trail to the site, creating a walking trail on site along the abandoned railroad.
Updated 2/2013

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Drake Chemical

The 8-acre Drake Chemical site in Lock Haven, Pennsylvania, operated as a chemical plant from the 1960s to 1981. The plant manufactured chemical intermediates for pesticides and other organic compounds. The site contained six major buildings, including offices, production facilities and a wastewater treatment building. The process buildings included 60 process tanks and reactors as well as 10 large tanks used for bulk storage of acids, bases, and fuel oils outside of the buildings. The site also included two lined wastewater treatment lagoons and two unlined lagoons. Site operators filled open areas on site with chemical sludge and contaminated soil, resulting in widespread soil contamination. In addition, ground water, and various on-site structures contained contamination. In 1982, EPA removed 1,700 exposed drums and drained chemical tanks. In 1983, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). The Agency removed soil in the leachate runoff area and directed the runoff into a sewer line in 1986. Cleanup activities also included excavation of the lagoon where the leachate drained, on-site treatment of contaminated soil, demolition of buildings and other on-site structures and disposal of materials at an off-site facility. EPA excavated contaminated soil and treated it in an on-site incinerator. EPA completed construction of the ground water treatment system in 1999 and began operation of the system in 2000. EPA also completed construction at the site in 2000. The treatment system continues to operate. A commercial storage facility uses a portion of the site. A local municipality owns the remainder of the site and it is currently not in use.
Updated 2/2013

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Dublin TCE Site

The Dublin TCE site is located in Dublin Borough, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Over the last 50 years, several manufacturing facilities have operated at the 4.5-acre site. During its operation on the site, Kollsman Motor Corporation reportedly used and disposed of solvents at the site. In 1986, Bucks County Health Department identified contamination attributed to site operations in private drinking water wells. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. EPA selected a remedy in 1991 to construct an alternate water supply for impacted wells. Parties completed construction of the alternate water supply in 1998. Currently, the site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) is working with EPA to treat ground water contamination. The current site owner uses the site to store and repair antique cars and leases some of the space to other businesses.
Updated 2/2013

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East Tenth Steet

The East Tenth Street site is located in an industrial area of Marcus Hook, Pennsylvania. Rayon and cellophane manufacturing started on the 36-acre site in 1910. Marcus Hook Business and Commerce Center obtained the property in 1986. The firm sold or leased many parcels and buildings and divided the site into 23 separate lots. Incorrect disposal and mishandling of materials during demolition resulted in ground water and soil contamination. EPA proposed the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1994. Site cleanup activities included securing or removing asbestos from the site, removing old transformers and contaminated cements from some buildings, and constructing fences to limit site access. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania has not concurred with listing the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). The Commonwealth has elected to pursue cleanup of the site under the Commonwealth’s Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act. Currently, industrial and commercial operations continue on leased lots at the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Enterprise Avenue
Site photo

The 57-acre Enterprise Avenue Superfund site is located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. From 1971 through 1976, the City of Philadelphia used the site to dispose of incineration residue, fly ash and bulky debris. Several waste handling firms also used the site to illegally bury drums containing industrial and chemical wastes. Improper disposal practices resulted in the contamination of soil and ground water. In 1983, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). The City of Philadelphia excavated and removed contaminated soil and placed a protective cap over the landfill. Ground water monitoring is ongoing at the site. EPA and the Philadelphia Department of Aviation are currently evaluating alternatives to accelerate the ongoing ground water cleanup. Following cleanup activities, EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1986. In 1999, the Philadelphia Department of Aviation completed construction of a 5,000-foot commuter runway over the site for the Philadelphia International Airport. The commuter runway reduces flight delays and traffic congestion at the airport. In 2008, the Philadelphia International Airport began designing plans to extend the commuter runway as part of an airport-wide expansion. Construction activities are currently underway.
Updated 9/2014

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Fischer & Porter Co.

The six-acre Fischer & Porter Co. site currently operates as an active commercial property in Warminster Township, Pennsylvania. Fischer and Porter Company (F&P), a producer of flow meters and process control equipment, formerly owned the property and used it for testing and manufacturing operations. F&P (now named ABB Instrumentation) continues to occupy some of the office space at the site, under lease from the current owner. In the early 1980s, EPA identified chemicals used by F&P during manufacturing activities in industrial supply wells on site and in public water supply wells in Warminster Township and the Borough of Hatboro. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Site cleanup activities included the installation of ground water extraction and treatment systems at both the industrial wells and public water supply wells. In 2000, Blue Marlin Associates purchased part of the undeveloped portion of the site property for construction of an 80,000 square-foot office, manufacturing and warehouse facility. Commercial business activities continue at the site while ground water treatment is ongoing.
Updated 2/2013

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Havertown PCP

The Havertown PCP Superfund site is located in Havertown Township, Pennsylvania. From 1947 to 1991, National Wood Preservers operated a wood treatment facility at the 12-acre site. The company reportedly poured liquid wastes on surface soil and disposed of liquid wastes in a well. The wastes leaked into ground water under the plant. Site investigations identified contamination in the site’s ground water, surface water and soil. EPA placed the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. A ground water extraction and treatment facility has been in operation since 2001 and continues treating ground water. Cleanup activities have included the removal and disposal of about 97,000 tons of liquids, 55 gallons of solids and 60 tons of sludges, all containing hazardous wastes. After removing all site infrastructure, remedial workers installed a 3-acre synthetic cap over areas of soil contamination on the property. In 2009, the site received $3.4 million in American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) funds to help with cleanup and monitoring efforts. Thanks to the ARRA funding, remedial workers completed the site’s cleanup in the summer of 2010. Two commercial establishments continued operations at the site during cleanup: a produce store and a fast food restaurant. On another portion of the site, demolition of the former Philadelphia Chewing Gum Corporation factory made way for a new $22 million YMCA facility. Once completed, site stakeholders expect the 70,000-square-foot YMCA facility to create 150 to 200 jobs in the community. Construction of the facility began in 2012. YMCA plans to open the facility which includes pools, a gymnasium and wellness center, locker rooms and an educational care center in 2013. Other companies are considering portions of the site for redevelopment and the City of Haverford and EPA will continue to work with interested parties to return the site to safe and productive reuse.
Updated 2/2013

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Heleva Landfill

The Heleva Landfill site in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania encompasses 93 acres of land which includes a 26-acre capped landfill. Open-pit iron ore mining operations in the late 1800s left four open, water-filled pits at the site. In 1967, the site began operations as a sanitary landfill. The landfill accepted general mixed refuse including paper, wood and orchard wastes. The landfill also accepted unconfirmed types and amounts of industrial wastes, including solvents. The landfill closed in 1981 and the landfill operators placed a 2-foot layer of clay over the wastes. Detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), chemical components of solvents, and degreasers resulted in EPA’s placement of the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities at the site included the installation of a new landfill cover, a passive gas venting system and a ground water pump-and-treat system. Cleanup activities also included the extension of the public water supply to 38 residences impacted by site contamination. Currently, the ground water pump-and-treat system continues to operate at the site. Additionally, a landscaping business uses a 1-acre area outside of the capped area for storage. The remaining areas of the site include the 26-acre capped area as well as wooded areas, surface water bodies and cleared areas used as farm fields.
Updated 2/2013

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Henderson Road

The 7-acre Henderson Road site is located in a commercial business area of Upper Merion Township, Pennsylvania. Beginning in 1975, O’Hara Sanitation Company, Inc. used the site for waste storage, waste recycling, vehicle maintenance and parking, and office facilities. Site operators used a former industrial water supply well to dispose of industrial liquid wastes during the 1970s. EPA identified ground water contamination as well as two other areas of concern at the site, including an area of previously ponded water and a landfill. The landfill contains approximately 158,000 cubic yards of material. Additionally, site operators had disposed an additional 21,000 cubic yards of trash and cinder fill on properties next to the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup activities included placement of a landfill cap and installation of a ground water pump-and-treat system. Ongoing cleanup activities at the site include ground water monitoring, vegetation maintenance, erosion repair, leachate monitoring and methane monitoring at the capped landfill on site. Currently, Browning Ferris, Inc. operates a trash truck repair facility at the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Jacks Creek/Sitkin Smelting & Refining, Inc.
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The 115-acre Jacks Creek/Sitkin Smelting & Refining, Inc. site is located in in a rural agricultural area of Mifflin County, Pennsylvania. From 1958 until 1977, Sitkin Smelting Company operated a smelting and precious metals reclamation facility on the site. Site investigations identified lead and other metals in ground water on site. Additionally, soil at the site contained lead, copper, zinc, cadmium and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) contamination. Sediment contamination identified along Jacks Creek, a recreational area for fishermen, prompted a consumption advisory for brown trout, bluegill, rock bass, fall fish and white suckers. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup activities included the demolition of on-site buildings; removal of underground storage tanks, ash material, transformers and drums; excavation and on-site treatment of contaminated soil; and construction of a multi-layer cap. Monitoring is ongoing and a metal scrap yard and aluminum recycling facility continue operations on a portion of the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Keystone Sanitation Landfill

The Keystone Sanitation Landfill site is located in Union Township, Adams County, Pennsylvania. The 40-acre landfill accepted municipal and industrial wastes as well as construction debris from 1966 until 1990. Site investigations identified contaminants in ground water, surface water and sediments. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987 and issued a Record of Decision (ROD) prescribing cleanup in 1990. The remedy was modified in 1999 to include ground water extraction and treatment and in 2000 to include enhanced landfill gas extraction. Operation of the ground water extraction and treatment system began in 2000, and operation of the landfill gas extraction system began in 2003. Both systems continue to operate as part of long-term remedial actions. Currently, grass covers the capped landfill portion of the site and one private residence is located on site.
Updated 2/2013

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Kimberton

The 45-acre Kimberton site is located in the Kimberton Borough, Pennsylvania. Since 1947, site operators have manufactured resins, textiles and asphalt products on the site. From 1947 to 1959, site operators disposed of various residues in eight lagoons at the site. In 1981, EPA identified volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in monitoring wells. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List in 1983 after confirming soil and ground water contamination. A series of early cleanup actions took place, including the removal of drums, excavation of lagoons and treatment of residential wells. The site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) provided an alternate source of drinking water to 25 nearby residences and businesses until completion of the municipal water connection in 1992. The site’s ground water extraction and treatment system began operation in 1993. The system continues to operate at the site. The Henry Company has operated the facility at the site since 1969 and has continued its operations throughout cleanup. The company’s facilities include a main plant, warehouse, office buildings and the ground water treatment plant on a 24-acre portion of the property. Private parties have purchased and entered into long-term leases for the remaining 21 acres of open, undeveloped land at the site but this portion is currently not in reuse.
Updated 2/2013

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Lansdowne Radiation Site

The Lansdowne Radiation site is located in Lansdowne, Pennsylvania. From 1924 to 1944, a University of Pennsylvania chemistry and physics professor processed enriched radium ore in the basement of his home on Stratford Avenue. Processing activities resulted in radium contamination of the three-story duplex house in which he lived, as well as two garages on the property, two garages on neighboring properties, approximately 243 feet of municipal sewer line, sidewalks, the street and soil on eight properties. Radioactive contamination, including radium, radon gas, and radon decay products, prompted EPA to place the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1985. In 1986, EPA conducted cleanup activities, including demolishing the house; cleaning up contaminated soil, sidewalks and portions of the street; repaving the street and replacing the sewer line. EPA disposed of contaminated materials at an off-site radioactive waste disposal facility and then backfilled and reseeded the excavate areas. EPA removed the site from the NPL in 1991. The site remains a residential neighborhood with private homes.
Updated 2/2013

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Lindane Dump

The Lindane Dump site is located in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. The site includes an upper project area and a lower project area. Redevelopment activities have restored a 14-acre portion in the upper project area of the site into a community park and recreational area. From 1850 until 1986, several companies used the site for waste disposal. Pennwalt used the site to dispose of wastes from mining, chemical manufacturing and electrical generation until 1959. From 1965 until 1986, Allegheny Ludlum disposed of wastes from steel manufacturing and building demolition at the site. In 1976, Harrison Township received 14 acres of the upper project area of the site for use as a recreational park. However, EPA identified contamination in ground water, soil and leachate in the lower project area of the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Under EPA oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) closed and dismantled the park as part of cleanup activities. These activities included capping the site and constructing a leachate collection and treatment system. Operation and maintenance activities at the site are ongoing. Following the completion of cleanup activities at the site in 1999, restoration of the Alsco Community Park took place, including planting of 150 trees. The park now includes tennis courts, baseball fields, a utility building, pedestrian paths, picnic areas, open space and an asphalt parking areas.
Updated 2/2013

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Lower Darby Creek Area Green Infrastructure
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The Lower Darby Creek Area site is located along Darby Creek in Philadelphia and Delaware Counties, Pennsylvania. The site consists of two landfills: the Clearview Landfill and the Folcroft Landfill. The landfills began operating in the 1950s. Folcroft and Clearview Landfills were ordered to be closed in 1973. Unpermitted waste management operations at Clearview Landfill continued through the late 1980s. During operations, the landfills accepted municipal, demolition and hospital wastes. Site operators placed wastes and landfill material along the edges of the creek. During and after operations, the landfill contributed contamination to surrounding creeks and wetlands through surface erosion, runoff and seeps. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2001. EPA has completed site investigations and studies and is preparing the proposed plan for the Clearview Landfill waste and soil portion of the site. EPA is conducting further investigations for ground water affected by the Clearview Landfill. Several businesses operate on the southern end of the Clearview Landfill. These businesses include a storage area, a snow plowing business, an auto repair and salvage business, and a drum recycling business. The United States Fish and Wildlife Service currently manages the Folcroft Landfill portion of the site as part of the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge. EPA is working with the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) to conduct site investigations and studies for the Folcroft Landfill portion of the site. Additionally, EPA is conducting human health and ecological risk assessments for the aquatic portions of the Site. The first phase of reuse planning efforts identified reuse goals and potential future uses for the site, including reuse options to support a regional recreational greenway along Lower Darby Creek. EPA is planning to conduct additional reuse evaluations for the Clearview Landfill as part of the remedy design process.
Updated 2/2013

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McAdoo Associates

The McAdoo Associates Superfund site consists of two separate areas, or operable units (OUs) about 1.5 miles apart: the McAdoo Kline Township (MKT) location (OU1) located in Kline Township, Pennsylvania and the McAdoo Blaine Street (MBS) location (OU2) in McAdoo Borough, Pennsylvania. Deep mining of anthracite coal from the 1880s to the 1960s, as well as metal reclamation operations occurred at OU1. Prior to 1972, OU2 operated as a heating oil and gasoline storage business. McAdoo Associates stored wastes at these sites from 1978 until 1979, when the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources (now the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection) revoked McAdoo's permit to operate. EPA investigations determined that site activities contaminated soil and ground water. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983 and selected a cleanup plan for the site in two Records of Decision (RODs), dated 1984 and 1991. Cleanup activities at OU1 included removal of above ground storage tanks, additional soil sampling, conducting a study of the potential collapse of mining areas, excavation of contaminated soil, installation of a soil cap over the area, and ground water monitoring. Cleanup activities at OU2 included emptying and removing the underground storage tanks, excavation of soils from around the underground storage tanks, conducting confirmatory soil sampling, off-site disposal of contaminated soil, backfilling of the excavated area, and installation of ground water monitoring wells. A 1995 Explanation of Significant Differences for OU2 requires manual extraction of contaminated ground water from wells on a periodic basis. OU1 remains capped and fencing surrounds the area. In 1998, a local business owner entered into a Prospective Purchaser Agreement (PPA) to purchase OU2. A PPA is a tool used by EPA that encourages the redevelopment of contaminated property by eliminating liability issues for the purchaser. With the PPA in place, the owner constructed a small warehouse/storage facility on the property for business operations. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2001.
Updated 10/2013

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Metropolitan Mirror and Glass Co., Inc.

The 8-acre Metropolitan Mirror and Glass Co., Inc. site is located in an industrial area of Frackville, Pennsylvania. Metropolitan Mirror and Glass, Inc. manufactured mirrors from 1959 until 1982, when it declared bankruptcy. Site operators disposed of wastes from use of silver solutions, paint strippers, paint thinner and other solvents in the manufacturing processes in four on-site lagoons. Site investigations identified contamination in soil and ground water. In 1992, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). St. Jude Polymer Company operated at the site from 1987 until its facility closed in 2010. St. Jude Polymer Company maintained a plastics recycling center at the site and operated throughout the cleanup process. In 2005, following the completion of cleanup, EPA deleted the site from the NPL.
Updated 2/2013

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Middletown Air Field

The 500-acre Middletown Air Field Superfund site is located between Middletown and Highspire in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. From 1898 through 1966, the federal government owned and operated the Middletown Air Field site as Army Camp George Gordon Meade and later as Olmstead Air Force Base. Historically, maintenance, overhauling and testing of aircraft took place at the site. The site also housed U.S. Air Force personnel. The Harrisburg International Airport has operated on the site since 1966. Operations at the site resulted in contamination of wells, ground water and soil on site. Ground water at the site provides water to approximately 3,500 area residents, as well as airline travelers and industry users. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Site investigations identified five disposal areas as potential sources of ground water contamination. As a result, cleanup activities included the removal of all contaminated materials from these areas and installation of ground water treatment and monitoring systems. A follow-up investigation in 1996 resulted in a cleanup plan requiring no further action. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1997. Currently, the Harrisburg International Airport continues operation at the site. The site also houses a Pennsylvania State University Campus, several industrial properties, and a storage and vehicle maintenance area for the Middletown School District.
Updated 2/2013

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Mill Creek Dump Green Infrastructure
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The 124-acre Mill Creek Dump Superfund site is located in Erie, Pennsylvania. The site includes 84 acres of former freshwater wetlands and a 40-acre strip of land next to Conrail railroad tracks. From 1941 until 1981, the site operated as an industrial and municipal dump, as well as an unpermitted dump area. For 40 years, the site accepted foundry sands, solvents, waste oils and other industrial and municipal wastes, filling all but four acres of the site. The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources closed the dump in 1981. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup activities began in 1987. The remedy included construction of a ground water treatment system, construction of a soil cap and a flood retention basin, and replacement of lost wetland habitat areas. In 1996, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) and Millcreek Township worked with EPA to modify the cap design to allow for development of a golf course over the cap. In 1998, the PRPs identified eight acres next to the site for construction of replacement wetlands to compensate for habitat lost through cap construction. Construction of the golf course concluded in 2001. PRPs donated the 9-hole golf course and driving range property to Millcreek Township in 2002. In 2006, Erie International Airport completed the final design for its runway expansion project, which included acquisition of portions of site property. The expansion required 12 acres of the cap and golf course area for the runway expansion and easements. EPA, Erie International Airport, the PRPs and Millcreek Township worked together to reconfigure the golf course layout in order to accommodate the runway expansion and necessary easements. Runway expansion construction began in 2011 and the golf course shut down for the duration of construction. The extended runway opened to air traffic in November 2012. The reconfigured golf course and driving range are scheduled to reopen to the public in 2013.
Updated 2/2013

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Modern Sanitation Landfill Alternative Energy

The Modern Sanitation Landfill site is located in the townships of Windsor and Lower Windsor Township, York County, Pennsylvania. The site consists of an original 66-acre unlined landfill, which is part of the 371-acre permitted active Modern Landfill. Republic Services, Inc. owns and operates Modern Landfill. The total property area of Modern Landfill is 535 acres. Once a farm, the 66-acre area of the site operated as a landfill for open domestic dumping in the 1940s. Between 1976 and 1979, the unlined landfill reportedly accepted hazardous wastes. Site investigations identified volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination in ground water, surface water and soil. Additional investigations found contamination in private wells near the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Cleanup activities involved placing a low-permeability cap over 62 acres of the landfill portion of the site in 1989 and 1990. Under a permit modification in 1999, construction of double-lined landfill cells took place on top of the site. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania provides oversight of the permitted active Modern Landfill, which includes a leachate collection system, a ground water extraction and treatment system, and a gas collection system. Since 1998, methane from the landfill has powered a reciprocating engine, which produces electricity.
Updated 2/2013

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North Penn - Area 1

The North Penn - Area 1 site is located in Souderton, Pennsylvania. The site is one of 12 Superfund sites identified in the North Penn area contributing to area-wide ground water contamination. The site includes three facilities that contributed to contamination. The first facility, Gentle Cleaners, operated as a dry cleaning business from 1953 to 1983. The second facility, Granite Knitting Mills (GKM), also maintained a dry cleaning operation from 1967 to 1979. The third property, Parkside Apartments, once included a dry cleaning operation. Dry cleaning operations contaminated ground water and site soil. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. EPA excavated 428 tons of contaminated soil from the GKM and Gentle Cleaners properties. EPA also installed a ground water extraction system, which operated until 2005. After additional site investigations in 2008 detected elevated levels of contamination at a monitoring well, EPA installed a pump to extract contaminated water and discharge it to a sanitary sewer. EPA continues to monitor ground water at the site. Currently, several commercial businesses operate on the GKM and Gentle Cleaners properties. The Parkside Apartments have continued to operate as a residential community throughout the cleanup of the site.
Updated 2/2013

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North Penn - Area 2

The North Penn - Area 2 site is located in Hatfield, Pennsylvania. The site is one of 12 Superfund sites identified in the North Penn area contributing to area-wide ground water contamination. The site originally included eight properties. However, investigations have identified contamination on two properties. Therefore, cleanup activities have taken place at the 87-acre former Ametek facility and the former Steiert property. From 1963 to 1986, manufacturing operations took place at the former Ametek facility. The facility produced precision springs, reels, and measuring and controlling apparatus. The manufacturing process used up to 4,500 gallons per week of trichloroethylene (TCE) as a degreasing solvent. In 1980, the North Penn Water Authority detected TCE and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in on-site and down gradient wells as well as in soil. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Two separate cleanup efforts, in 1987 and 1995, removed contaminated soil and sediments, stabilized them in an on-site berm, and capped and seeded the berm. In 2007, cleanup activities included excavation and disposal of lead contamination from a portion of the former Steiert property. In 2009, EPA selected a final remedy for the former Ametek facility, which included soil and sediment removal, as well as upgrades to the system that pumps contaminated ground water off-site for treatment. This work was completed in 2012. Penn Color, Inc., a pigment production facility, currently operates at the former Ametek site. Flexible office space is under construction on the former Steiert property.
Updated 2/2013

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North Penn - Area 5 Green Infrastructure

The North Penn - Area 5 Superfund site occupies 35 acres in Hatfield and New Britain Townships, Pennsylvania. The site is one of 12 Superfund sites identified in the North Penn area contributing to area-wide ground water contamination. Since the late 1940s, various industries have operated at the site. These industries include an electronic communication systems and components manufacturing facility and a gas spring manufacturing facility, which produced components for the automobile industry and other mechanical equipment. Site investigations found contamination in on-site and off-site wells. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. EPA identified three areas of contaminated ground water at the site. In 2004, EPA issued a cleanup plan for two areas on site, which included in-situ chemical oxidation and ground water extraction and treatment. In 2011, EPA issued an interim cleanup plan which included bioremediation of ground water, land use restrictions and additional site delineation. Design of cleanup activities at the site is ongoing. Commercial and industrial businesses, residences, undeveloped woodlands, parkland and farmland continue to occupy various portions of the site.
Updated 2/2013

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North Penn - Area 6

The North Penn - Area 6 site is one of 12 Superfund sites identified in the North Penn area contributing to area-wide ground water contamination. The site encompasses ground water contamination in and around the Borough of Lansdale, Pennsylvania. Investigations have found chemical components of solvents and degreasers in ground water at the site. EPA identified 26 facilities in the Lansdale area as possible sources of contamination due to their use of site-related solvents. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Since initial site investigations began, EPA has arranged for the connection of approximately 20 residences with contaminated wells to the public water supply. Cleanup activities have addressed contaminated soil at several properties. Ground water extraction and treatment systems continue to operate. The site currently houses a variety of light industrial, commercial and residential land uses.
Updated 2/2013

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North Penn - Area 7

The North Penn Area 7 Superfund site is located in North Wales, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. The site is one of 12 Superfund sites identified in the North Penn area contributing to area-wide ground water contamination. The site covers 650 acres and includes five industrial facilities that use or previously used solvents. Ground water and soil at the site contain contaminants from former process wastes. An estimated 91,000 people get drinking water from public and private wells within three miles of the site. Public water supplies in the area come from ground water and the Delaware River. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Individual facilities have started cleanup activities, including soil excavation, soil aeration and pumping of contaminated wells. Through a Prospective Purchaser Agreement (PPA) and a removal action consent order, one of the properties has undergone a soil removal action. The property owner has constructed an apartment complex on the site. The site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) continue to conduct risk assessments on a portion of the site under EPA oversight. EPA and the PRPs completed cleanup of the Spra-Fin Inc. portion of the site in 2011. EPA and the PRPs completed a site-wide ground water investigation in 2011 and continue to conduct ground water studies in order to develop a cleanup plan. A vapor intrusion study is ongoing at the facilities on site. Several industrial facilities continue operations on several portions of the site.
Updated 2/2013

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North Penn - Area 12
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The North Penn - Area 12 Superfund site includes the 25-acre Transicoil, Inc. facility in Worcester, Pennsylvania. The site is one of 12 Superfund sites identified in the North Penn area contributing to area-wide ground water contamination. Electric motor manufacturing took place at the site from 1952 until 1991. The company disposed of solvent and waste oils in an underground storage tank. In 1979, the state discovered contamination in the ground water. In 1990, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA extended the public water supply to affected residences and businesses and constructed a ground water treatment system. Techni-Tool Inc., a catalog tool company, purchased the site through a Prospective Purchaser Agreement (PPA) with EPA in 1998. In 2000, Techni-Tool Inc. completed construction of a new distribution facility on site and began operations.
Updated 2/2013

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Occidental Chemical Corp./Firestone Tire & Rubber Co.

The 250-acre Occidental Chemical Corporation site is located in Lower Pottsgrove Township, Pennsylvania. Since before World War II, site owners have disposed of industrial wastes at the site. From before World War II until 1944, the site operated as an airplane engine manufacturing facility. Firestone Tire and Rubber occupied the site from 1945 until 1980, making tires and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) resins. Occidental Chemical Corporation bought the property in 1980 and continued to manufacture PVC resins at the site. On-site disposal of industrial wastes in landfills and unlined earthen lagoons caused contamination of ground water. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. The site ground water remedy involves extracting and treating ground water, as well as long-term ground water monitoring. Cleanup activities, completed in 2008, included the excavation and removal of PVC sludge materials in earthen lagoons and restoration of the area with clean fill. Occidental Chemical Corporation has ended operations, but long-term ground water treatment and monitoring continues at the site. A warehouse facility, owned by BCW, Inc., currently occupies approximately 40 acres of the original 250 acres.
Updated 2/2013

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Ohio River Park
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The Ohio River Park Superfund site is located on the western tip of Neville Island, Pennsylvania. Neville Island lies in the middle of the Ohio River, five miles from the Pittsburgh airport. Beginning in the 1930s, the site served as a municipal landfill accepting domestic waste and construction debris. From 1952 to 1966, Pittsburgh Coke & Chemical Co. (PC&C) owned the site. PC&C used the site as a disposal area for its industrial manufacturing wastes. Site operators placed wet waste in trenches and piled dry waste on the ground. Improper storage of waste resulted in contamination of soil, sediment, surface water and ground water. This contamination posed a threat to the people and ecology of the island. It also posed a threat to the municipal water wells of the Borough of Coraopolis, which is located across the river from Neville Island. In 1976, before the discovery of site-related contamination, Neville Land Co. (NLC) donated the island to Allegheny County for use as a park. After spending $2.4 million for developing the park, Allegheny County discovered the industrial waste. The county returned the land to its previous owner. In 1990, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). NLC took responsibility for the cleanup and coordinated remediation with redevelopment goals under the supervision of EPA, state, and county officials. NLC removed contaminated soil, covered concentrated waste with a multi-layer cap and covered remaining site areas with an erosion cap. Following the placement of property use restrictions on the deed, developers began construction of a 32-acre sports complex in 1998. The Island Sports Center began its first full season of operations in the winter of 1998 and 1999. The Center includes a golf training facility, a fitness center, a restaurant, a covered golf dome, an outdoor site for soccer and baseball, a shot put practice area, a 5-acre building housing two Olympic indoor ice skating rinks, and accompanying parking lots and sidewalks. The 250-by-300-foot covered golf dome lies on the eastern section of a 7-acre area covered by a multilayer cap. Another capped area supports an ice rink and a restaurant. In 2004, Robert Morris University purchased the property and added a new track area, a lacrosse field and a practice field to the inventory of existing athletic facilities. NLC remains responsible for the environmental monitoring as well as operation and maintenance at the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Old City of York Landfill

The 178-acre Old City of York Landfill site is located in Seven Valleys, Pennsylvania. The site includes a 56-acre landfill operated by the City of York, Pennsylvania from 1961 until 1975. During operation, the landfill reportedly accepted industrial wastes. In 1981, site investigations identified contamination from the landfill in ground water and nearby domestic wells. Contaminants found in ground water included volatile organic compounds (VOCs), iron, magnesium and mercury. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included restoring 16 acres of soil cover that had eroded from a portion of the landfill, installing a ground water pump-and-treat system, removing contaminated sediment from the on-site leachate vaults and monitoring surface water. In 2000, operations of the ground water pump-and-treat system ended and monitored natural attenuation began at the site. A private owner has resided in a permanent residence at the site since 1978.
Updated 2/2013

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Palmerton Zinc Pile Green Infrastructure
Site location map

The Palmerton Zinc Pile Superfund site is located in the Borough of Palmerton, Pennsylvania. Former primary zinc smelting operations from two plants in Palmerton (east and west plants) resulted in area-wide contamination. The several-thousand-acre site includes Blue Mountain, a large smelting residue pile called the Cinder Bank, and much of the surrounding valley north of Blue Mountain. For nearly 70 years, the New Jersey Zinc Company disposed of 33 million tons of smelting waste at the site. In 1981, Horsehead Industries, Inc. (HII) purchased the smelters and began operating the east plant facility as a hazardous waste recycling plant. Today, HII continues operations at the site, processing electric arc furnace dust. Former smelting operations emitted heavy metals into the valley, resulting in the defoliation of approximately 4,000 acres on Blue Mountain. The defoliated area allowed for surface water contamination from erosion of contaminated soils into Aquashicola Creek and the Lehigh River. Heavy metals, such as lead, cadmium, zinc and copper contaminated dust, soil, shallow ground water and surface water. The presence of lead in blood samples triggered public health and environmental investigations. EPA placed the site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. The site’s cleanup plan includes revegetation of Blue Mountain, surface water diversion and treatment, and soil cleanup on private properties. EPA is currently developing a cleanup plan for shallow ground water and surface water. In 2002, the Lehigh Gap Nature Center (LGNC) purchased over 750 acres of property along the Kittatinny Ridge. LGNC began erosion stabilization and revegetation of the property with native grasses in 2003. In the same year, they officially opened the Lehigh Gap Wildlife Refuge to the public. Today, over 13,000 trees, including the American chestnut, and native grasses cover 3,000 acres of Blue Mountain. The refuge provides valuable habitat for local wildlife and migratory species. The refuge has a vast trail system for hikers, birders and outdoors enthusiasts. It also offers programs in environmental education, wildlife viewing and native habitat restoration research. In 2010, a new visitor and education center opened at the site. The center includes a lobby, research library, classroom/laboratory and restrooms. In September 2014, EPA Region 3 awarded the LGNC with an “Excellence in Site Reuse” award. The award highlights the organization’s efforts to reuse a large portion of the site as a wildlife preserve that promotes ecological conservation and education.
Updated 10/2014

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Presque Isle Green Infrastructure
Site photo

The Presque Isle site is located on the Presque Isle State Park peninsula in Erie County, Pennsylvania. From the early 1970s until the early 1980s, discharge of a noxious hydrogen sulfide-bearing black liquid released hydrogen sulfide into the air and contaminated soil and shallow ground water near Beach No. 7 within the park. Investigations identified an unplugged natural gas well, which was dug in 1910 and abandoned in 1920, as the source of the discharge. The discharge contaminated soil and ground water. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included plugging the leaking well with cement down to 900 feet. Monitoring has not detected discharge since 1982. Further site investigations did not find contamination in the air, surface water, ground water or soil. EPA removed the site from the NPL in 1988. Today, Presque Isle serves as a public recreational area used for picnicking, swimming and fishing. The park contains an ecological reservation, which provides a natural habitat for deer, squirrels and waterfowl. Approximately 4 million people visit the Presque Isle State Park each year.
Updated 2/2013

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Publicker Industries Inc.
Site location map

The Publicker Industries Inc. Superfund site is located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, along the Delaware River near the Walt Whitman Bridge and cover about 40 acres. Publicker Industries Inc. produced liquor and industrial alcohols at the site and later used the site as a petroleum product and chemical storage facility. Publicker discontinued operations and abandoned the site in 1986. The abandoned site included tanks, drums, chemical laboratories, production buildings, warehouses, a power plant, and aboveground and underground process lines. Solid and liquid gas streams, highly-reactive lab wastes and gas cylinders posed a threat of fire and explosion. Wastes and former operations caused contamination of ground water, soil and debris. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Site cleanup involved the removal and off-site disposal of contaminated debris, containers, building materials and soil; the capping and sealing of ground water wells; asbestos removal; and remediation of electric and storm water utilities. The site represents one of the first sites in the country where the Prospective Purchaser Agreement (PPA) led to redevelopment and economic revitalization at the site. Site stakeholders finalized the PPA in 1994 and amended the document in 1996, allowing the new site owners to purchase and redevelop the site without liability for contamination caused by previous owners. EPA recognized the site as the nation's 500th construction complete Superfund site in 1997. In 2000, EPA deleted the site from the NPL. Currently, the Site is used for the storage and as a parking lot for the marine terminal next to the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Recticon/Allied Steel Corp.
Site location map

The five-acre Recticon/Allied Steel Corp. site is located in East Coventry Township, Pennsylvania. The site includes two properties: the former Recticon facility and the Allied Steel Products Corporation facility. Recticon, a subsidiary of Rockwell International, manufactured silicon wafers at the site from 1974 to 1981. Allied Steel Products Corporation fabricated steel at the site beginning in 1972. Manufacturing activities at the site contaminated on-site and private wells. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Residents impacted by contaminated ground water received water filtration systems until their connection to municipal water supply lines in 1999. Site cleanup activities included the excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated soils and the installation of a ground water extraction and treatment system. In 2002, a pilot program for ground water treatment used enhanced bioremediation at the site with periodic use of the pump-and-treat system. The Longstreth Corp. purchased the Allied Steel property through a Prospective Purchaser Agreement (PPA) with EPA and currently operates a women’s sports equipment business and retail store. Additionally, a marble and granite showroom operates on the Recticon property.
Updated 2/2013

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Revere Chemical Green Infrastructure
Site photo

The Revere Chemical Co. Superfund site is located in Nockamixon Township, Pennsylvania. Until abandoning the property in 1970, Revere Chemical Co. operated a processing facility for acid and metal-plating waste at the site. The company stored hazardous wastes at the site in drums, piles and unlined earthen pits. Wastes contaminated surrounding soil, ground water and Rapp Creek, which flows through the heart of Nockamixon. In 1987, EPA added the 113-acre site to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA worked with the Pennsylvania Department of Health and the Revere Steering Committee, a group of 12 potentially responsible parties (PRPs), to clean up the site and prepare it for reuse. The PRPs installed a cap over the contamination and planted wildflowers and other warm season foliage on top of the cap. In 2002, Nockamixon Township took ownership of the site. The site now provides habitat to a diverse population of migratory birds and other wildlife. Additionally, Nockamison Township allows use of the site for bird watching and star gazing activities. EPA and the PRPs have placed a covenant on the site property to make sure both the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and EPA receive notice of and opportunity to comment on any proposed reuse of the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Ryeland Road Arsenic Site Green Infrastructure
Site photo

The Ryeland Road Arsenic site consists of five parcels of land covering seven acres, as well as a forested wetland in a former nursery property in Heidelberg Township, Pennsylvania. Standard Chemical Works Corporation (SCWC) and Allegheny Chemical Corporation (ACC) used four of the parcels, located on the north side of West Ryeland Road, for manufacturing pesticides, fungicides, paints and varnishes, as well as wastes disposal until 1942. In the late 1970s, residential development began on these four parcels of land. SCWC and ACC used the fifth parcel, located on the south side of West Ryeland Road, primarily for waste disposal. Site investigations identified elevated levels of arsenic and lead in soil at the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2004. In 2006, cleanup activities began, including the permanent relocation of the residents of three on-site homes, demolition of vacated homes, and excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated soil. Cleanup activities also removed contaminated soil from adjacent residential properties. EPA conducted innovative cleanup and restoration activities on the forested and wetland-covered portion of the site. In 2009, EPA vacuum dredged the spring-fed creek at the site to minimize the impact on the stream, woods and wetlands. The Agency continues to plant hyper arsenic-accumulating ferns to help reduce arsenic concentrations in soil and wetland sediment. Ground water studies continue at the site. Residential land use continues on a portion of the site and the remainder of the site has transferred to Heidelberg Township. Heidelberg Township has constructed a pole building on the parcel on the south side of Ryeland Road. A local youth sports league leases the building for equipment storage.
Updated 2/2013

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Saegertown Industrial Area
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The 100-acre Saegertown Industrial Area Superfund site is located in Saegertown, Pennsylvania. For the past 40 years, a number of companies have operated at the site. General American Transportation Corporation (GATX) cleaned and repaired railroad tank cars from the mid-1950s to 1965. The Saegertown Manufacturing Co. began producing small steel components in 1965 and continues operations today. Spectrum Control Inc. manufactured ceramic capacitors. The Lord Corporation continues to produce adhesives, urethane coatings and rubber chemicals at the site. In 1980, the state identified contamination in the Saegertown Municipal Water Authority's Well #2. In 1990, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA selected cleanup activities for the site including on-site biodegradation for the ground water, sludge, and soil contamination; removal of over 32,000 tons of soil and sludge from the GATX area; and treatment and disposal of contaminated soil and sludge. The site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) conducted cleanup under EPA oversight and then backfilled the site with clean soil and reseeded. Ground water treatment and operation and maintenance activities as well as industrial operations continue at the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Sharon Steel Corp Green Infrastructure
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The 400-acre Sharon Steel Corporation (Farrell Works Disposal Area) site is located in Mercer County, Pennsylvania, near the Pennsylvania/Ohio state border. Starting in 1900, the Sharon Steel Corporation used the area to dispose of blast furnace slag, electric arc furnace slag, basic oxygen furnace slag and sludge. From 1949 to 1981, site operators dumped millions of gallons of spent pickle liquor acid over the slag in order to neutralize the acid with the carbonates in the slag. Leachate from the slag and sludge migrated into soil and ground water, leaving the site contaminated. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1998. Site cleanup included re-grading, contouring and treating contaminated slag and sludge with a biosolid cap; stabilizing eroded banks next to a river; implementing institutional controls to protect the remedy and to restrict land and ground water use; and developing a long-term monitoring plan for ground water, surface water and sediment at the site. Mercer County acquired the site through foreclosure and the site is currently for sale. In 2000, under a Prospective Purchaser Agreement (PPA), EPA worked with local companies to reuse the slag at the site for construction and road projects. Ongoing monitoring and cleanup activities include the restoration of 100 acres of wetlands at the site. Possible future reuse includes revegetation of portions of the site for recreational purposes.
Updated 2/2013

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Stanley Kessler

Since the 1960s, degreasing and repackaging operations have taken place at the 3-acre Stanley Kessler Superfund site in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. The Stanley Kessler Company operated a welding wire degreasing and repackaging business at the site until 2000. During operations, solvent degreasers ran into floor drains that fed into an underground septic tank and then into an in-ground tank without a structural bottom. In 1979, sampling detected contaminants in the Upper Merion Reservoir. Located about one-half mile north of the site, the reservoir provides water for the Philadelphia Suburban Water Company. In response, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Industrial operations continued at the site during cleanup. Three tenants continue industrial operations in the building on site. Institutional controls on the site property prohibit construction of new wells. Ground water treatment and monitoring are ongoing.
Updated 2/2013

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Tobyhanna Army Depot
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The 1,293-acre Tobyhanna Army Depot (TYAD) Superfund site is a military facility located in Monroe County, Pennsylvania. Past site operations included waste burning and burial, drum storage and the operation of a landfill and firing range. Wastes handled on the site included garbage, construction rubble, scrap metal, unexploded ordnance (UXO), drums and solvents. The U.S. Army first discovered volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in an on-site drinking water well in 1981. Sampling of nearby residential wells identified additional VOC contamination. In response, the U.S. Army provided affected residents with an alternate water source. Additional investigations confirmed that waste disposal activities contaminated site soil and ground water with volatile organic compounds. In 1990, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA documented a cleanup plan for the site in five separate Records of Decision (RODs) between 1996 and 2000. Cleanup activities included the excavation of contaminated soil, natural attenuation of contaminated ground water, institutional controls and long-term ground water monitoring. Remedy construction concluded in 2000. EPA’s cleanup plan allowed for the continued operation of base activities. In addition, several acres of previously contaminated land were cleared of UXO in accordance with the ROD to build a state of the art radar testing facility. Currently, TYAD is a communications-electronics maintenance and supply depot assigned to the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command. TYAD is the largest communications-electronics overhaul facility in the U.S. Army.
Updated 10/2013

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Valmont TCE Site

The Valmont TCE Site (Former – Valmont Industrial Park) is located in West Hazleton, Pennsylvania. The site consists of the former Chromatex plant in the Valmont Industrial Park. It also includes an area of ground water contamination that extends to the north and south from the plant. From 1978 until March 2001, Chromatex manufactured upholstery fabric at the site. In 1987, EPA identified contamination in ground water at the site and several residential wells in the area. As a result, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2001, and provided municipal water to the neighborhood. In 2004, EPA removed more than 18,000 tons of contaminated soil from the site for disposal at an off-site facility. EPA addressed vapor intrusion in nearby residences by installing vapor reduction systems in homes during 2006 and 2007. Also in 2007, EPA constructed a soil vapor extraction system inside the former Chromatex plant to address contaminated subsurface soils beneath the foundation. The soil vapor extraction system ran until 2009; the residential vapor mitigation systems continue to operate. In 2011, EPA selected final cleanup activities for the site. These activities include treatment of contaminated ground water, monitoring of ground water, operation of treatment systems and placement of institutional controls. While cleanup activities are ongoing, the plant on site continues to operate as a storage facility for detergent products.
Updated 2/2013

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Wade (ABM)
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The 3-acre Wade (ABM) Superfund site is located in a light industrial area along the west bank of the Delaware River in Chester, Pennsylvania. From 1950 until the early 1970s, a rubber recycling facility operated at the site. Illegal industrial waste storage and disposal also took place at the site until 1978. Parties stored wastes in drums on site or dumped the wastes directly onto the ground or into trenches. In 1978, an intense fire at the facility destroyed one building and extensively damaged two others used for storing drummed wastes. The fire and waste disposal activities resulted in contamination of ground water and soil. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. EPA removed 15,000 gallons of waste and 155 tons of contaminated soil and site debris from the site for off-site disposal. EPA capped and re-graded the site, covering it with topsoil and seeding it to minimize erosion. Following the completion of cleanup activities, EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1989. In 2003, EPA and the Chester Parking Authority entered into a Prospective Purchaser Agreement (PPA). The Chester Parking Authority purchased the site and redeveloped it as a parking area for the City of Chester’s Barry Bridge Park complex in 2004. Redevelopment activities included improvements to the cap, installation of a storm drainage system, and resurfacing the site for parking and green space. These activities significantly upgraded the existing remedy and supplemented the redevelopment of the adjacent park area, which includes a new public access fishing pier, boat ramp and a riverwalk recreational area. In 2008, demolition of most of the open space of the Barry Bridge Park complex took place to prepare for the construction of Chester’s new professional soccer stadium on that property. The site area remains as a paved parking area. The parking area has undergone modifications including widening of the existing asphalt driveway on the property, and extending and improving the paving for the river walk.
Updated 2/2013

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Walsh Landfill Green Infrastructure

The 7-acre Walsh Landfill Superfund site is located along a forested ridge in Honey Brook Township, Chester County, and Caernarvon Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Unpermitted dumping took place at the site from 1963 until 1977. Improper disposal practices contaminated ground water and residential well water. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. EPA removed drummed wastes from the site and provided an alternate water supply to 44 homes with contaminated well water. In 1998, EPA connected 45 residences to a municipal water supply. In 2006, a group of potentially responsible parties (PRP group) installed an evaporation/transpiration cover system over the site to reduce infiltration to the landfill and subsequent chemical leaching to ground water. The PRP group planted 4,100 deep-rooting hybrid poplar trees and shallow rooting plants on top the cover system. These plantings absorb rainwater and prevent excess water from collecting on top of the cover and potentially damaging it. Vegetation covers the site and most trees planted on the cover now stand 16 to 20 feet tall. The PRP group continues to inspect the site and conducts routine ground water monitoring.
Updated 2/2013

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Westinghouse Electric Corp. (Sharon Plant)

The 58-acre Westinghouse Electric Corp. (Sharon Plant) Superfund site is located in Sharon, Pennsylvania. From 1922 to 1985, Westinghouse Electric manufactured electrical transformers at the site. Spills during plant operations resulted in the contamination of soil, ground water and sediment of the nearby Shenango River. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Under EPA oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) completed cleanup activities for soil, ground water and sediment. The PRPs continue to conduct monitoring activities at the site. Industrial enterprises currently own and operate the site. Industrial operations include galvanized steel and coil manufacturing, as well as steel tube warehousing and storage.
Updated 2/2013

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Westinghouse Elevator Co. Plant

The Westinghouse Elevator Co. Plant Superfund site is located in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Westinghouse Elevator Company (known as Schindler Elevator Corporation since 1989) has manufactured elevators and moving stairways at the site since 1968. Years of solvent spills at the site contaminated area ground water and well water. In 1986, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). In one on-site well, trichloroethylene exceeded safe drinking water levels by a factor of 8,000. To stop the spread of ground water contamination, the site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) installed a full-scale ground water pump and treatment system under EPA oversight. The treatment system continues to operate and ground water monitoring is ongoing. Schindler Elevator Corporation as well as two other businesses operate at the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Westline

The 40-acre Westline Superfund site is located in McKean County, Pennsylvania. For almost 40 years, the Westline Inn on the site has served as a landmark destination for tourists that come to visit the nearby Allegheny National Forest. Few would suspect that property where the inn resides was once a hazardous waste site. From 1901 to 1952, the Day Chemical Company operated at the site. The firm converted lumber into charcoal, methanol and acetic acid. The plant changed owners three times before equipment deterioration, declining profits and a fire forced its closure in 1952. The Westline Inn began operating in the old house on the site in 1975. EPA discovered toxic tar deposits from the former operations in soil and ground water in the early 1980s. EPA removed the exposed tar and placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. EPA developed a cleanup plan that included removing several additional tar deposits and monitoring ground water. Following cleanup activities, EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1992. The Westline Inn has continued to operate throughout the cleanup and remains a popular McKean County attraction.
Updated 2/2013

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Whitmoyer Laboratories
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The 22-acre Whitmoyer Laboratories Superfund site is located in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania. A veterinary and pharmaceutical manufacturing plant operated on the site from 1934 to 1984. Site operators disposed of arsenic compounds in unlined lagoons at the site. These practices resulted in the contamination of site soil, ground water and surface water. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. The site’s cleanup began in 1993 and included ground water treatment and the removal of on-site buildings, contaminated soil and 50,000 tons of hazardous waste. In 2004, EPA entered into a Prospective Purchaser Agreement (PPA) with Jackson Township to help facilitate the township’s purchase of the site for recreational use. Jackson Township opened Jackson Recreational Park in 2005. The local community enjoys recreational facilities at the site, including baseball and soccer fields as well as a scenic walking trail surrounded by trees, shrubs and plants. The trail links to other local and regional natural resources, such as Tulpehocken Creek and the historic Union Canal.
Updated 2/2013

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York County Solid Waste and Refuse Authority Landfill Alternative Energy Green Infrastructure

The 135-acre York County Solid Waste and Refuse Authority Landfill Superfund site is part of a larger 300-acre area in Hopewell Township, Pennsylvania. From 1974 to 1985, the York County Solid Waste Authority (YCSWA) operated a permitted landfill on site. It received about 400 tons of solid waste each day. The dumping of wastes into unlined pits contaminated ground water. The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) discovered the contamination in 1982. PADEP ordered YCSWA to stop operations in 1985. EPA added the site to the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. YCSWA led the cleanup. The remedy included ground water treatment and use of carbon filtration systems in affected homes. Monitoring of the landfill’s gas ventilation system and ground water wells, ground water treatment, and landfill cap maintenance are ongoing. YCSWA also established legal controls to prohibit new wells and activities that may disturb the landfill cap. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 2005. Today, Hopewell Township and YCSWA reuse portions of the site for recreational and ecological use in addition to alternative energy generation. YCSWA and York County Solar Partners, LLC launched a 2-acre solar array, consisting of 806 panels, to generate power for the site’s general energy needs, including ongoing management of ground water treatment systems and office buildings. Annually, the array generates 300,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity. The array became operational in July 2014 and reduces the facility’s dependence on fossil fuels. YCSWA and Hopewell Township also made a portion of the site part of the 200-acre Hopewell Area Recreation Complex. Trails, playgrounds, athletic fields, picnic pavilions, wildlife habitat and two wildlife viewing areas are located there. The recreation complex opened in 2007. The wildlife habitat attracts over 122 different species of birds, including raptors, wood peckers and doves.
Updated 9/2014

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