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Sites in Reuse in Virginia

Abex Corp.
Site photo

The Abex Corp. Superfund site is located in Portsmouth, Virginia. The site operated as a brass and bronze foundry for 50 years. The foundry recycled used railroad journal bearings and recast the metal to produce new bearings. The disposal of foundry waste sands and emissions from the smelting furnaces contaminated on-site soil, surrounding residential yards, a small playground and a rehabilitation center. In 1990, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Under EPA oversight, the potentially responsible party (PRP) completed cleanup activities on a 3-acre portion of the site. Cleanup activities included demolishing foundry buildings, removing contaminated soil and placing institutional controls on the site property. Redevelopment has taken place on the cleaned up area, which now includes public service, commercial, industrial and recreational land uses. In 2001, the local community dedicated a new fire department headquarters and training facility at the site. The City of Portsmouth has continued redevelopment at the site, including a park, a beverage distribution center, a shopping center and the not-for-profit Portsmouth Community Health Center. Cleanup and investigation activities continue at additional areas on site.
Updated 2/2013

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Arrowhead Associates/Scovill Corp.

The 30-acre Arrowhead Associates/Scovill Corp. site is located in a rural area in Westmoreland County, Virginia. From 1966 to 1972, Scovill Corp. electroplated cosmetic cases. Arrowhead, Inc. of Delaware continued the electroplating operations from 1972 until 1979. Arrowhead Associates/Scovill Corp. ceased electroplating operations in 1979, abandoning machinery and process materials. Beginning in the early 1980s, Mattatuck Manufacturing fabricated automobile wire harnesses on a portion of the site. A.R. Winarick used another portion of the site to operate a facility that filled cosmetic cases. Site operators discharged treated electroplating wastes to the Scates Branch under a permit issued through the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System. Site investigations identified contamination in a ground water plume beneath the site, which extends off-site and into the Scates Branch and the South Fork Scates Branch. Investigations also identified contamination in the former disposal ponds. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Cleanup activities have included the treatment of contaminated ground water through use of a barrier to capture and breakdown contaminants, installation of an impermeable surface cap in 2002, and construction of a soil vapor extraction system. EPA continues to monitor ground water and sample ground water, surface water, sediments, indoor air and subsurface soil. A.R. Winarick’s operations at the site ended in the mid-1990s. Mattatuck Manufacturing ended operations and vacated the site in 2005. The O’Gara Group purchased the facility at the site and currently uses it as part of its full service tactical training facility and for the manufacture of barricades for use at its nearby training race track.
Updated 2/2013

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Atlantic Wood Industries, Inc.
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The 48-acre Atlantic Wood Industries, Inc. Superfund site is located in an industrialized waterfront area of Portsmouth, Virginia. Savannah Creosoting Company, later known as Atlantic Wood Industries, Inc., constructed a facility on the site and began site operations in 1926. Operations at the site continued through 1992 and included wood treating with creosote and pentachlorophenol. Site operations and waste disposal activities contaminated soil, ground water, and river sediments. In 1990, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). In 2003, crews completed the cleanup and restoration of a wetland adjacent to the property. Studies continued in order to determine necessary remedial efforts for on-site soil, ground water and sediments. In 2009, the site received $3.7 million in American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) funds to expedite site cleanup. The ARRA funding allowed the cleanup to begin in 2010, one year earlier than originally projected, and helped create jobs in the area. The cleanup includes soil stabilization, sediment dredging, soil excavation and consolidation, and wetland mitigation word. Currently, Atlantic Wood Industries, Inc. uses a portion of the site as a pre-stressed concrete production facility. In 2012, FIGG Bridge completed the South Norfolk Jordan Bridge over the Southern Branch of the Elizabeth River. The bridge runs through the site and FIGG has implemented part of the cleanup at the site. Cleanup and construction of the bridge at the site has spurred additional work on a grain export facility immediately downstream from the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Avtex Fibers, Inc. Alternative Energy Green Infrastructure
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The Avtex Fibers, Inc. site is located in Front Royal, Virginia. The site includes a 440-acre plant that manufactured rayon and other synthetics from 1940 to 1989. Plant waste disposed of in on-site impoundments and fill areas caused contamination of site ground water, nearby residential wells and the Shenandoah River. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. The rayon manufacturer abandoned the plant in 1989. EPA then initiated removal and remedial actions at the site. Cleanup actions included the removal of contaminated soil, building demolition, debris treatment and removal, sewer excavation and landfill capping. Cleanup actions to address ground water and surface water began in 2012, including the construction and operation of a ground water extraction and treatment system. The community developed site reuse plans, including a 240-acre conservancy park along the Shenandoah River and a 165-acre business park called the Royal Phoenix. In addition, EPA served in an advisory capacity to the local Economic Development Authority (EDA), the United States Soccer Foundation and FMC Corporation, as site stakeholders worked together to build four soccer fields and a skate park on a 30-acre parcel of land at the site. September 2006 marked the opening of the Skyline Soccerplex, the first completed redevelopment at the site. The EDA is moving forward with redevelopment efforts for a 160-acre commercial/industrial park east of the railroad tracks and a nature conservation area west of the tracks. Thanks to stakeholder restoration efforts, wildlife has already begun to return to the area.
Updated 2/2013

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Chisman Creek Green Infrastructure
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The baseball and soccer fields of Chisman Creek and Wolf Trap Parks in York County, Virginia, demonstrate how a partnership between private and public sectors can lead to the successful cleanup and reuse of a Superfund site. EPA, York County, Virginia Power and the local community teamed up to create a 31-acre recreational complex at the site. From 1957 to 1974, Yorktown Power Generating Station used the abandoned sand and gravel pits at the site for the disposal of fly ash. Fly ash is a byproduct created by burning fossil fuels. Site investigations found heavy metal contamination in ground water and nearby Chisman Creek. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Under EPA’s oversight, the site’s potentially responsible party (PRP), Virginia Power, conducted cleanup activities. These activities included a connection to the public water supply for nearby residents, placement of a cap and a soil cover over two separate portions of the site, installation of a ground water collection system, modification of surface water drainage pathways and monitoring of surface water. The local community actively supported the reuse of the site as a recreational complex. Following the completion of cleanup activities, Virginia Power worked with EPA, the state, local officials and the community, to design and build two recreational parks on the site. The recreational complex opened in 1991 and supports several sports teams, ponds and a County Memorial Tree Grove. The site’s cleanup became part of a larger water quality improvement effort that led to the reopening of the Chisman Creek estuary for private and commercial fishing.
Updated 2/2013

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Former Nansemond Ordnance Depot

The 975-acre Former Nansemond Ordnance Depot site is located in Suffolk, Virginia. The Army obtained the property in 1917 and used it for munitions storage, shipment, classification, reconditioning, loading, and destruction. The facility handled up to 1,300 tons of ammunition daily. At the end of World War II, the Army used the Depot for demobilization, including the destruction of unserviceable explosives, ammunition and chemicals. In the 1960s, several entities, including the Frederick Campus of Tidewater Community College (TCC), Dominion Power Company, General Electric Company (GE), Hampton Roads Sanitation District, and former County of Nansemond received portions of the site. A site inspection identified six major source areas containing hazardous substances. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1999. EPA has identified an additional 29 known or suspected contamination sources at the site. These areas include known or possible explosive magazine lines, burning grounds, disposal pits, fill areas, demolition areas, test areas, drum storage areas, other storage areas, holding/settling tanks, pongs, trenches, mounds, ground scars, piers and off-shore dumping areas. The site’s cleanup included the removal of munitions, explosives, contaminated debris and miscellaneous ordnance items as well as the excavation of contaminated soil. Due to ground water contamination, the City of Suffolk extended municipal water lines to the TCC campus. Of the 207 acres deeded to Dominion Power, 135 acres now include the Bridgeway Commerce Park, an office, technology, and research and development space. The City of Suffolk plans to acquire another portion of the site to develop the Hampton Roads Technology Park. This 158-acre commercial park with will feature office, research and development space; a high-technology workforce development center; hotels and corporate/conference centers; a restaurant; and a day-care facility.
Updated 2/2013

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H & H Inc., Burn Pit

The H & H Inc., Burn Pit site is located in Hanover County, Virginia, approximately 12 miles northwest of Richmond, Virginia, and 0.5 miles south of Farrington, Virginia. Between 1960 and 1976, Haskell Chemical Company, located in Richmond, Virginia, used the 1-acre site for the disposal of printing inks and paint manufacturing wastes. The company collected and transported the wastes to the site in drums and dumped the drums into a shallow, unlined pit for burning. Site investigations identified contamination in ground water and sediment at the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List in 1989. Under EPA oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) completed cleanup of contaminated sediment in the former pit area in 1998, and cleanup of downstream sediment in 1999. The ground water and soil vapor extraction and treatment system operated at the site from 2000 until 2011. EPA and the PRPs are currently evaluating alternative treatment technologies to address remaining ground water contamination at the site. The site owners operate a timber lot at the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Norfolk Naval Base (Sewells Point Naval Complex)

The 4,630-acre Norfolk Naval Base (Sewells Point Naval Complex) Superfund site is located just north of Norfolk, Virginia. The site is an active naval base providing Atlantic Fleet command and support for U.S. Navy vessels and aircraft. Industrial activities at the site generated hazardous products, including corrosives, petroleum, paint waste, electroplating waste and solvents. Site investigations in 1994 revealed on-site contamination with the potential to affect neighboring waterways. EPA added the site the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1997. Cleanup actions involved removal of soil, sediment and buried drums; capping; treatment of ground water in place; and installation of ground water extraction and treatment systems. The site reached construction completion in September 2010. The Virginia Department of Transportation is currently assessing potential designs for a highway connector to the Norfolk airport that would cross the site. Though highway construction is not yet underway, workers have relocated and rebuilt facilities located on the future highway paths. These facilities, including soccer and recreational sports fields, were rebuilt on a former landfill area of the site and are now open for use. The naval station continues to provide ocean-front space, facilities and logistics support for U.S. Navy vessels and aircraft. Currently, the Norfolk Naval Base is the world’s largest naval outpost. Maintenance, optimization and monitoring of in-place remedies and institutional controls continue.
Updated 10/2013

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Saltville Waste Disposal Ponds Green Infrastructure
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The Saltville Waste Disposal Ponds Superfund site is located on the border of Smyth and Washington Counties along the North Fork of the Holsten River in Virginia. The site covers 125 acres and includes two large former waste disposal ponds as well as the former location of a chlorine manufacturing plant. The plant operated from 1950 to 1972. Site investigations in the 1970s initially identified high mercury levels in site soil, ground water and sediments of the North Fork of the Holston River as far as 75 miles downstream of the site. The two waste disposal ponds on site contained mercury and high-pH waste material. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. The site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) conducted cleanup activities. These activities included dredging mercury-contaminated sediments from the river, diverting clean surface water around the disposal ponds, and installing and operating a treatment plant to remove mercury from ground water contaminated by leachate from the waste disposal ponds. In 2003, the PRP installed caps and covers over the two waste disposal ponds and planted grasses, shrubs and trees to support a valuable wildlife habitat area.
Updated 2/2013

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Saunders Supply Co.

The 7-acre Saunders Supply Co. Superfund site is located in Suffolk County, Virginia. The site operated as a wood treating plant until 1991. Improper use, treatment and disposal of wood treating chemicals resulted in contamination of soil and ground water both on site and off site. In 1981, the Virginia State Health Department investigated a complaint from the adjoining property owner, who found chemical liquid resembling wastewater sludge in the postholes dug on his property. In 1984, Saunders Supply Company excavated the contaminated material and disposed of it in a landfill. The company also installed a recovery well and used the recovered water as process water for wood treating operations. EPA discovered further contamination at the site, and added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. EPA selected a cleanup plan, which included disposal of contaminated material, soil incineration, ground water monitoring and placement of institutional controls on the site property. Later, EPA included ground water treatment to protect Godwins Millpond, a source of drinking water for the City of Suffolk. The Saunders Supply Company’s lumberyard continued operations during the cleanup. Cleanup operations ended in 1999 and ground water treatment and monitoring continue at the site. Saunders Supply not only operates a wholesale lumberyard on site, but also owns and operates a hardware store just south of the site. Contamination also impacted the adjacent Kelly Nursery. Kelly Nursery continued operations during remediation and has since expanded its operations, including building additional greenhouses.
Updated 2/2013

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U.S. Titanium

The U.S Titanium Superfund site is located on the north side of Piney River in Nelson County, Virginia. The site includes 50 acres of a 175-acre titanium dioxide manufacturing plant that operated from 1931 to 1971. By-products of titanium dioxide manufacturing and heavy metals contaminated soil, surface water and ground water at the site. Six major fish kills occurred in the Piney and Tye Rivers between 1977 and 1981. Acidic ground water seeps and acidic storm water runoff from on-site waste piles and ponds contributed to these fish kills. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Under EPA oversight, the site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) removed, neutralized and buried 67,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil in a containment cell. The PRP also neutralized acidic stream beds and adjacent soil and constructed an on-site ground water treatment plant. Re-grading, slope stabilization, soil cover and establishing vegetation reduce overland contamination. Following cleanup activities, a group of citizens in Amherst and Nelson Counties, in cooperation with the local governments, obtained Rails-to-Trails grant funding. They converted the former Blue Ridge Railroad right-of-way on site to a hiking path for public recreational use.
Updated 2/2013

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