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Sites in Reuse in Georgia

Camilla Wood Preserving Company
Site photo

From 1947 until 1991, wood preserving activities at the 54-acre Camilla Wood Treating Superfund site in Camilla, Georgia resulted in the contamination of site soils and ground water with dioxin, pentachlorophenol (PCP), creosote and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Site operations included the common wood preserving process of treating railroad ties and poles with creosote. EPA performed investigations and short-term cleanups called removal actions at the site from 1991 through 1997. Activities included treatment or disposal of on-site surface water, gathering and storage of drums with spent chemicals from the treatment process, and removal of equipment and debris off site. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List, the Agency’s list of top-priority Superfund sites, in August 1998. The City used Superfund Redevelopment Initiative Pilot funding to commission a reuse planning process and to share the results with EPA. The City worked with a community-based Land Use Committee and a consultant team to develop a conceptual reuse framework plan. The Committee discussed and defined reuse priorities for the site, and concluded that the most appropriate reuse of the site would be a community park serving the needs of Camilla’s residents and visitors. The conceptual reuse framework plan, presented to the Camilla City Council in June 2003, included the following components: a community park, recreation and community facilities, a fire and rescue training area, a stormwater management area, and ecological areas. In late 2006, the Superfund Redevelopment Initiative provided additional resources so that the City of Camilla could work with EPA Region 4 to update the 2003 conceptual reuse framework plan to both inform and reflect the removal actions future land use implications. Since the development of the first reuse framework plan, a significant increase in demand for soccer fields has developed within Mitchell County. The Land Use Committee determined that the site would be an ideal location for a soccer complex, given its close proximity to major access roads, athletic fields, Mitchell-Baker High School and residential neighborhoods. The Committee also identified the need for basketball courts, walking trails, a flexible open space area, a small RV park, and the potential for use of the existing office building as the Mitchell County Parks and Recreation Department Headquarters. Final cleanup activities for the western portion of the site began in November 2006 with successful completion of the remedy construction in January 2008. Today, several soccer fields and an RV park provide the public with new recreational opportunities. Cleanup of the eastern portion of the site began in May 2012 with completion scheduled for mid-2014. The City and county are once again collaborating with site agencies to integrate remedy and reuse considerations, including access points, utility connections and grading. The City and county have drawn up initial plans to accommodate remaining priority recreational uses identified by the community, including basketball courts, baseball fields, batting cages, a playground, picnic tables and a volleyball court. Walking and biking trails could also be extended across the entire site and connect to downtown Camilla following cleanup.
Updated 1/2013

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Cedartown Industries
Site photo

The Cedartown Industries, Inc. Superfund site is located about 60 miles from Atlanta in Cedartown, Georgia. The 6.8-acre site includes a concrete block office building with a truck scale, a truck maintenance building and the foundation of a former foundry. Industrial activities performed at the site since 1874 include iron-ore smelting, secondary lead smelting, and pump and plow blade manufacturing. In 1986, the Georgia Environmental Protection Division (EPD) conducted a site inspection. The inspection found that site activities contaminated site soil, sediment and ground water with heavy metals. In 1990, initial removal actions included the removal and proper disposal of slag, contaminated debris, soil, wastewater and sediment. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990 and selected a final cleanup plan in a 1993 Record of Decision (ROD). Cleanup activities included the excavation and treatment of contaminated soil, long-term ground water monitoring and land use and ground water use restrictions. Following the completion of remedy construction in 1997, EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2006. The successful cleanup of the site allowed the continued operation of an on-site business throughout cleanup activities. The current owners purchased the site property in August 1984 and currently lease the property to H&W Transfer Company for truck parking and maintenance.
Updated 10/2013

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Hercules 009 Landfill
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The Hercules 009 Landfill Superfund site is located in Brunswick, Georgia. From 1948 through 1980, Hercules, Inc. manufactured toxaphene at the 16.5-acre site. Toxaphene is an agricultural pesticide used to control boll weevils, ticks and mites on cattle. Hercules used seven acres at the northern end of the site, known as the 009 Landfill, to dispose of wastewater sludge and toxaphene-contaminated drums, rubble and trash. In March 1980, the Georgia Environmental Protection Division (EPD) collected soil and water samples from drainage ditches around the site as part of a state investigation. The samples revealed toxaphene in both soil and water samples. As a result, the EPD canceled Hercules, Inc.’s permit to operate the landfill. In 1982, EPA banned the use of toxaphene and site operations ceased. Based on the presence of site-wide contamination, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. In 1991, EPA issued an interim cleanup plan to address potential ground water contamination around local private wells. EPA issued a second cleanup plan in 1993. This plan included stabilizing onsite soil and sludge; installing a cap over the landfill to reduce rain infiltration and direct contact with treated soil; monitoring ground water, surface water and sediment in the on-site pond and the drainage ditch next to the site; and maintaining the landfill cap for at least 30 years. Taking advantage of the location of the landfill cap, a car dealership directly north of the site worked with the potentially responsible party to put the site back into reuse without harming site cleanup efforts. The car dealership fenced and paved the top of the capped landfill to create a parking lot. The dealership uses this parking lot to display its cars. This use has helped to further preserve the integrity of the capped landfill beneath.
Updated 1/2013

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LCP Chemicals Georgia
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The LCP Chemicals Superfund site is located in Brunswick, Georgia and consists of approximately 550 acres, the majority of which is a tidal marsh. Process buildings, an administration office and a caustic brine ground water treatment system occupy the remaining portion of the site. An oil refinery, a paint manufacturing company, a power plant and a chlor-alkali plant all operated at the site between the early 1920s and 1994. Manufacturing activities contaminated the site with mercury, lead, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). EPA added the site to the National Priorities List in June 1996 and remedial efforts remain ongoing. EPA recently endorsed a tract of site property as being able to support reuse and Glynn County seized this opportunity. The County has decided to use a portion of the LCP Chemicals site for a new county detention center. The Honeywell Corp., the current site owners, and the County finalized a $475,000 agreement for use of a 35-acre tract of property to house the new 610-bed jailhouse. The County began clearing the property for future construction in the fall of 2012 and the estimated total cost of the project is $22.8 million.
Updated 1/2013

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Luminous Processors
Site photo

A McDonald's fast food restaurant and playground have replaced an abandoned, contaminated factory on this one-acre former Superfund site in Athens, Georgia. For more than 35 years, Luminous Processors used radioactive isotopes to manufacture glow-in-the-dark watch and clock dials. The company abandoned its property in 1980, leaving behind a contaminated building and radioactive soil. In 1981, EPA proposed adding the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) and provided funds to the State of Georgia to carry out the cleanup. State contractors excavated approximately 18,000 cubic feet of contaminated soil, shipped off more than 2,400 drums, and disposed nearly 500 millicuries of radium-226. Excavated areas were then backfilled with clean fill, seeded with grass and closed from access to the public with fencing and warning signs. The cleanup of the Luminous Processors site was complete by December 1982, only five short weeks after the start of cleanup activities. After EPA, in consultation with the State, determined that all appropriate Superfund-financed cleanup action under the Superfund law had been implemented, and that no further cleanup action by responsible parties was appropriate, the site was deleted before it was finalized on the NPL. The thorough cleanup of the site in an area experiencing tremendous growth not only increased surrounding property values, but also attracted the McDonald's Corporation to the property. Today, a McDonald's restaurant occupies the former Superfund site, providing jobs and a convenient fast food restaurant for local shoppers.
Updated 1/2013

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Marzone, Inc./Chevron Chemical Co.
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The 8.9-acre Marzone Inc./Chevron Chemical Co. Superfund site is located in a rural area just outside the City of Tifton in south-central Georgia. For approximately 30 years, the 20-acre site supported a pesticide manufacturing plant whose poor operating practices resulted in contamination of the soil, sediment and ground water. In 1989, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA cleanup activities included the decontamination of buildings and equipment and the excavation and proper disposal of contaminated soils and over 1,700 tons of waste materials. Chevron Chemical Company owned and operated a pesticide and herbicide formulation plant on a portion of the site EPA refers to as Operable Unit-1 (OU-1) from 1950 to 1970. Light industry, including equipment storage and metal recycling operations, currently operate in the north and south warehouses on OU1. The Banner Grain & Peanut Company continued operations throughout the cleanup of the pesticide contamination. Once cleanup is complete, the Banner Grain & Peanut Company will be able to expand its operations utilizing more of the property. The success of the groundbreaking cleanup and cooperation among the stakeholders not only maximizes the benefits to the Banner Grain & Peanut Company, but also enables further economic growth in the surrounding area.
Updated 1/2013

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Monsanto Corporation

Chemical plant operations involving the production of phosphoric acid began at the Monsanto Corporation Superfund site in 1962. The 75-acre site is located in an industrial park in Richmond County, Georgia, three miles southeast of Augusta. Over the years, Monsanto dumped arsenic-laden wastes and sludge in two small landfills on the property. Contamination from these landfills eventually spread to the ground water. In 1984, EPA added the site to the Superfund National Priorities List (NPL). Under direction of EPA and the State, the Monsanto Corporation cleaned up the property, removing the contents of both landfills and transporting the waste to a licensed facility. The company also built a system to clean the contaminated ground water. Due to the success of site cleanup activities, EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1989. The cleanup not only protects the health and safety of the public and the environment, but also enables the on-site facility to continue to operate, retaining jobs and income in the community. Prayon Inc., the current owner of the facility who purchased the property from Monsanto in 1999, plans to continue phosphoric acid manufacturing operations.
Updated 1/2013

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Peach Orchard Rd PCE Groundwater Plume Site

The 350-acre Peach Orchard Road PCE Groundwater Plume Superfund site is located in Augusta, Georgia. Known or possible users of tetrachloroethylene include dry cleaning facilities, gasoline service stations, auto salvage yards and automotive repair shops. EPA determined that four of nine identified area dry cleaners contributed to PCE contamination in ground water. In 2005, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities include ground water treatment, sampling and analysis and soil treatment and excavation. The site is located in a residential and commercial area.
Updated 10/2013

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Woolfolk Chemical Works, Inc.
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For years, the properties surrounding the old Woolfolk Chemical Works Superfund site in Fort Valley, Georgia, were contaminated eyesores. Today, following cleanup, these properties feature government and community spaces, including an office, a welcome center and a 15,000-square-foot public library. For more than 60 years, the Woolfolk Chemical Plant produced a variety of agricultural pesticides. Over time, many of the chemicals used daily at the plant seeped into the ground near homes and businesses and polluted the ground water. In 1990, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA worked quickly to clean up polluted soil, contaminated ground water and residences. Today, homes affected by the site’s contamination are clean and remain in use. In 2009, the site received $1.8 million in American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) funds to support additional on-site cleanup efforts, such as soil removal and treatment, backfilling, stockpiling for off-site disposal, grading, closing and re-vegetating the property. The stimulus funds enabled EPA to redirect resources to expedite the cleanup by 6 to 12 months and the expedited cleanup allowed the City of Fort Valley to begin reuse planning and redevelopment earlier on certain sections of the site. EPA also supported the community’s efforts to develop a reuse plan for the site with a Superfund Redevelopment pilot grant. Today, Fort Valley's new library, office space and welcome center stand as a testament to the successful collaboration between EPA and the community of Fort Valley, Georgia. EPA continues to work with the local community to integrate local reuse priorities as part of the cleanup for remaining parts of the site. A bus company reuses a paved portion of the site to park buses. The City of Fort Valley also uses the property to host several local festivals, including the ComSouth Hambone Jam and an annual fall festival. These site uses generate tax revenue that the City can then invest in additional redevelopment activities.
Updated 8/2013

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