Jump to main content or area navigation.

Contact Us

Superfund


   

Sites in Reuse in Ohio

Allied Chemical & Ironton Coke Green Infrastructure
Site photo

The 137-acre Allied Chemical & Ironton Coke Superfund site is located next to Ice Creek in Ironton, Lawrence County, Ohio. The site includes a former coke plant and five former lagoons, a former tar plant, portions of Ice Creek, and a former sand and gravel pit used for disposal of tar plant waste and foundry sand. The coke plant began operations in 1917, discharging its wastes into the on-site lagoons and Ice Creek. Ownership of the site’s facilities changed several times until coke plant operations shut down in 1982. Site operations resulted in contamination of ground water, soil and sediment at the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. The site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) has conducted cleanup activities at the site, including construction of an underground barrier to contain contamination, treatment of ground water and preparation of the site for possible future reuse. The ground water extraction and treatment system began operation in 1997. Between 1997 and 2001, the PRP removed and then treated or disposed of contaminated soil and sediment. In 2000, tar plant operations ended at the site. In 2003, the PRP completed decontamination and demolition work at the tar plant. In 2007, EPA selected a cleanup plan for the former tar plant area. The cleanup plan includes capping of contaminated soil, land-use restrictions to make sure the cap remains intact, and a project to dredge and then cap contaminated river sediment. Currently, the PRP is preparing designs to carry out the cleanup plan. The PRP continues annual monitoring of the wetland area at the site. As of 2011, recovery of the wetlands habitat is occurring through natural processes. The PRP prepared 37 acres of the site that do not require any further cleanup action for industrial reuse. The PRP transferred this area to the City of Ironton in 2002 as part of a brownfield redevelopment effort. Ironton then conveyed part of the area to the State of Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT). ODOT constructed a county garage for highway maintenance activities. ODOT also constructed office space for its county manager and clerical staff. In September 2011, EPA and the City of Ironton hosted a reuse assessment workshop in Ironton as part of the ongoing reuse planning process at the site funded by EPA.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Behr Dayton Thermal System VOC Plume
Site photo

The Behr Dayton Thermal System VOC Plume Superfund site is located in Dayton, Ohio. Since 1937, operators have used the site to manufacture vehicle air conditioning and engine cooling systems. Site operations resulted in the contamination of ground water beneath the site. In 2006, Ohio EPA and U.S. EPA identified high levels of contaminated vapors in soils and homes above the ground water plume. As a result, EPA installed vapor mitigation systems in over 200 residences above the plume. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2009. EPA continues to investigate remaining contamination at the site. The site includes residential, commercial and industrial properties.
Updated 10/2013

For more information:

Bowers Landfill Green Infrastructure
Site photo

The creation of wetlands along the Scioto River in Circleville, Ohio, has transformed the 12-acre Bowers Landfill Superfund site into a haven for plants, birds, fish and animals. In 1958, the site served as a gravel quarry and later became a residential landfill until 1968. After 1968, unauthorized dumping of chemical and industrial wastes, large appliances and used tires occurred at the site. Unauthorized dumping resulted in contamination of ground water and the nearby Scioto River. In 1983, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA worked closely with Ohio EPA, the Ohio Division of Wildlife, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and area residents to design and carry out a cleanup plan that converted much of the site into wetlands. Cleanup activities included removal of contaminated waste, capping and venting the landfill, and re-vegetating the landfill surface. Following the completion of cleanup activities, EPA placed land use restrictions on the site property and deleted the site from the NPL in 1997. The 7-acre wetland area in the Scioto River floodplain has helped prevent damage to the landfill cap by absorbing excess waters and releasing them slowly back into the environment. The site also provides new recreational opportunities, including hunting, fishing, canoeing and wildlife photography. The cleanup and ecological reuse of the site are contributing to the State of Ohio's restoration of wetlands state-wide. Ohio EPA and the current site owner are working to update restrictions on the site to allow for the sale of the property and continued recreational use for hunting and fishing.
Updated 9/2013

For more information:

Feed Materials Production Center (USDOE) Green Infrastructure
Site photo

The Feed Materials Production Center (USDOE) Superfund site is located in Fernald, Ohio, 18 miles northwest of Cincinnati. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) constructed and operated the facilities at the site. From 1951 to 1991, the site’s facilities produced high purity uranium metal in support of national defense programs. Operations included purifying a variety of feed materials, converting uranium compounds into uranium metal, casting the metal into various shapes and machining the castings. As a result, the primary contaminants at the site are radionuclides, including uranium, thorium and radium. Uranium processing operations led to contamination of the site’s soil, surface water and ground water. In 1986, DOE entered into a Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement with EPA that required site investigations. Operations at the site ended in 1989. The same year, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) and the site’s production mission formally ended as cleanup began. Between 1991 and 2006, EPA and DOE completed 30 removal actions at the site. Remedial techniques included excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated material, demolition of on-site structures, disposal and stabilization of materials with cement, and ground water extraction and treatment. Parties completed cleanup activities in 2006; however, ground water treatment is ongoing. DOE issued a draft Natural Resources Restoration Plan for the site and an Environmental Assessment on the Final Land Use of the Fernald Closure Project in 1998. Restoration began during the cleanup process. Integration of remedial actions with environmental restoration projects resulted in an innovative and cost-effective cleanup. The restoration transformed the site into a publicly accessible ecological preserve. Wetlands, prairie and forest ecosystems provide valuable wildlife habitat and educational exhibits help tell the story of the site’s history, cleanup and ongoing restoration. DOE restoration activities have restored more than 900 acres for ecological use and public access on 7.4 miles of walking trails. The site also houses a recently renovated Visitors Center, which achieved the U.S. Green Building Council’s certification for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED). The Visitors Center provides educational opportunities for the public to learn about former site operations, contamination, remediation and restoration, and long-term surveillance and maintenance at the site.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Industrial Excess Landfill Green Infrastructure
Site photo

The 30-acre Industrial Excess Landfill Superfund site is located in Stark County, Ohio. Prior to 1966, sand and gravel mining operations took place at the site. Beginning in 1966, landfill operations used the mining and excavation pits. The landfill at the site received industrial wastes from nearby rubber industries, hospital wastes, septic tank wastes from cleaning firms, and general municipal wastes. The landfill operated until 1980. Site investigations identified contamination in ground water at the site in 1984. As a result, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Between 1985 and 1988, EPA constructed a methane gas venting system to control migration of methane and other landfill gases. EPA also removed industrial waste drums from the site and installed air strippers in the affected residences to remove contaminants from drinking water wells. The site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) connected 100 residences to the public water supply in 1991 under EPA and state oversight. Cleanup activities at the site also included construction of a vegetative cover over the landfill and monitoring of ground water. In 2004, the site’s PRPs planted 8,424 trees and shrubs at the site as part of the vegetative cover to provide a stable, protective soil covering and to foster development of a diverse wildlife population. The PRPs also removed invasive species and installed kestrel nest boxes, bluebird boxes and bat boxes to attract wildlife back to the site. Site stakeholders have discussed potential future recreational reuse at the site.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Miami County Incinerator

The 65-acre Miami County Incinerator Superfund site is located in Miami County, Ohio. In 1968, an incinerator and several landfills opened at the site to process and dispose of municipal and industrial wastes. Landfill operations generally incinerated combustible wastes and landfilled non-combustible wastes. However, site operators landfilled large volumes of combustible wastes along with non-combustible wastes. Landfilling operations continued until 1978 when the site converted to a solid waste transfer station. Improper waste disposal practices resulted in contamination of ground water, soil and sediment. Ground water contamination threatened the sole source aquifer for the surrounding population. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. The site’s potentially responsible parties (PRP) connected impacted residents to the public water supply between 1989 and 1990. The PRPs also constructed an impermeable cap, a soil vapor extraction (SVE) system and a ground water extraction and treatment system. The SVE system operated until 2000. Ground water extraction and treatment is ongoing at the site. Miami County currently owns the site. The county operates several county entities on site, including the county sheriff's office, a prison, a juvenile detention center and the county engineering offices, in addition to the solid waste transfer station.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

South Dayton Dump & Landfill Green Infrastructure

The 80-acre South Dayton Dump & Landfill Superfund site is a former industrial landfill in Moraine, Ohio. From 1941 until 1996, the landfill accepted drums, metal turnings, fly ash and other industrial waste. Site operators burned combustible wastes. Following landfill activities, site operators filled in areas with sand and gravel and sold or leased portions of the site property to local businesses. Site investigations began in 1985 and have identified contamination in ground water, soil and sediment of the neighboring Great Miami River. EPA proposed the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2004. Under EPA oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) began investigations to evaluate cleanup options for the site in 2008. Investigations are ongoing. EPA is working with the PRPs to design a cleanup plan for the site. In 2012, EPA’s Superfund Removal Program began sampling for soil gas and collected data indicating the presence of vapor intrusion at harmful levels in several buildings on site. EPA issued an Action Memorandum for the site to address vapor intrusion and protect on-site businesses while allowing them to remain open and in their current locations. The PRPs have expressed that they will continue to address vapor intrusion. Currently, commercial and industrial continue operations on a 40-acre area of the landfill. In addition, the Miami Conservancy District owns a floodway in the southern part of the site.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

South Point Plant
Site photo

The 610-acre South Point Plant Superfund site is located in the Village of South Point, Ohio. From the 1940s until the late 1990s, manufacturing facilities at the site produced explosives, industrial chemicals and fuels. The site contains three unlined landfills that contain a variety of wastes, including fly ash, plant refuse, coal cinders and small quantities of chemicals. Numerous activities have contributed to the contamination of site ground water and soils, including a number of major spills. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. EPA’s cleanup plan included the excavation and proper disposal of contaminated soil, containment of contaminated ground water through a pump-and-treat system, and the implementation of land use and ground water use restrictions. Through collaboration with the Lawrence Economic Development Corporation (LEDC) and local governments, EPA supported redevelopment of the site. EPA awarded the site a Pilot Grant in 2001. LEDC used the grant to evaluate how cleanup at the site could support reuse. In 2004, EPA issued the site the first Ready for Reuse determination in the Midwest. Following the site’s cleanup, The Point business park opened for business in 2001. Today, The Point hosts more than 10 businesses and offers employment opportunities to the local community. Future plans for The Point include additional tenants, expanded facilities and construction of an intermodal facility to serve as a vital road, rail and river transportation resource for the region.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Zanesville Well Field
Site photo

The 28-acre Zanesville Well Field Superfund site is located on the east and west banks of the Muskingum River in Zanesville, Ohio. American Encaustic Tiling Company, a ceramic products manufacturer, constructed the original facilities on the west bank in 1893. Since then, several companies have owned and operated the facilities. United Technologies Automotive (UTA) acquired the property in 1974 and conducted manufacturing operations at the site until 1991. Waste handling practices during various operations on site and disposal of waste-containing drums in an on-site well resulted in contamination at the site. In 1983, UTA installed a ground water extraction and treatment system and an air stripper to address ground water contamination, removed contaminated debris and 121 drums from an on-site well, and then closed the well. In the same year, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). UTA implemented a soil vapor extraction system in 1985 to supplement the ground water remediation system. After EPA selected a final remedy for the site and reached a settlement agreement with UTA, UTA excavated contaminated soils from the site in 1996. In 2008, a new company purchased the property. The firm does not operate at the site, but leases space in existing on-site buildings to other businesses. Several businesses have moved into existing site buildings since 2009, including a sign fabrication company and a lawn care company. A candy company moved into a 350,000-square-foot building on the southern portion of the site in 2010. Under EPA oversight, UTA assessed the building on site for vapor intrusion. This assessment, completed in 2011, did not observed any potential risks.
Updated 2/2013

For more information: