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Superfund


   

Sites in Reuse in Wisconsin

Eau Claire Municipal Well Field
Site photo

The Eau Claire Municipal Well Field Superfund site is located in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. In the 1980s, State of Wisconsin routine ground water sampling found chemicals in the municipal water supply. EPA determined that the National Presto Industries Superfund site, located nearby, was the source of the ground water contamination. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup activities include providing an alternate water source to affected residents and treating contaminated ground water. The site consists of 15 municipal ground water wells in two well fields that provide drinking water to about 60,000 residential and commercial users.
Updated 10/2013

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Lauer I Sanitary Landfill

The 58-acre Lauer I Sanitary Landfill Superfund site is located in Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin. From the mid-1950s through 1972, the landfill accepted various municipal and industrial wastes. The landfill closed in 1973 and shortly thereafter, state inspectors identified leaking passageways between the landfill liquid (leachate) collection pond and a ditch that drains into the Menomonee River. Toxic substances and metals contaminated the leachate. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. In 1990, Waste Management signed an agreement with EPA and began designing a cleanup plan for the site. From 1996 to 1998, Waste Management improved the landfill cap and methane collection system at the site. The firm also collected leachate and sent wastewater to a treatment plant. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) and EPA work together to closely monitor surrounding wells and private wells near the site. Long-term protectiveness is underway as the WDNR and EPA continue to improve ground water, leachate and landfill gas monitoring. Waste Management integrated an asphalt-paved parking lot for garbage vehicles into part of the landfill cover.
Updated 10/2013

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Murray Machinery Incorporated

The Murray Machinery Incorporated site is located in Stettin, Wisconsin. A foundry was once located on site and primarily produced gray iron castings for the paper industry. Between 1966 and 1988, site operators disposed of foundry wastes in a landfill at the site and stored wastewater from emission control processes in a surface water impoundment. In 1993, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) discovered contamination in site soils, surface water, sediment and ground water. Additional site investigations discovered leaking underground storage tanks, which resulted in additional soil contamination. Murray Machinery installed a soil vapor extraction system and EPA initiated a Removal Action in 1994 after the company stopped short of achieving site cleanup goals. The Removal Action removed contaminated sediments and capped portions of the landfill. Wisconsin DNR also covered the landfill with an asphalt cap and provided for ground water monitoring. Brownfield Investments, LLC purchased the property following the completion of site cleanup activities. Currently, site operations include a non-metallic mining operation, a sand-and-gravel operation, an insulation distribution company and a wood truss manufacturing facility. A manufacturer of attachments for heavy equipment also leases a portion of the site’s refurbished foundry building. Today, site reuse provides valuable infrastructure and employment opportunities to the local community.
Updated 2/2013

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National Presto Industries Inc.

The 320-acre National Presto Industries Inc. Superfund site is located in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. The federal government purchased the site in the 1940s for the manufacturing of radar tubes and ordnance chemicals for the war effort. National Presto Industries Inc. (NPI) purchased the site in 1947 and began manufacturing household appliances, outboard motors, aircraft parts, artillery shells and other defense-related products. Beginning in 1966, site operators landfilled waste products on site. Landfilling operations resulted in ground water contamination at the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. During site investigations, EPA also identified site-related contamination at the nearby Eau Claire Municipal Well Field site. An air stripper was installed Eau Claire Municipal Well Field site to address ground water contamination. NPI, the site’s potentially responsible party (PRP), constructed and began operation of a ground water extraction system in 1987. NPI also connected affected residents to the public water supply in 1991 and placed a cap over contaminated wastes on site. Contracts between National Defense Corporation (NDC), a wholly owned subsidiary of NPI, and the U.S. Department of Defense ended in 1992. NPI dismantled most equipment on site. Remaining buildings on site currently operate as warehousing and diaper manufacturing facilities. The ground water extraction system and the soil vapor extraction system continue to operate at the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Northern Engraving Co.
Site photo

The Northern Engraving Co. Superfund site in Sparta, Wisconsin, is located next to homes, businesses and the La Crosse River. Past wastewater treatment and disposal practices used at the site resulted in soil, ground water and surface water contamination. As a result, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. A site remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) identified four areas of the site as sources of contamination. These areas included a sludge lagoon, a seepage pit, a sludge dump site and a lagoon drainage ditch. EPA’s 1987 site cleanup plan included the excavation and consolidation of contaminated soil and sludge, the installation of a cap over the lagoon, the imposition of site access and deed restrictions, and the implementation of ground water monitoring. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in October 1997 following the successful cleanup of the site. Northern Engraving Corporation continues to manufacture metal nameplates, dials and decorative trim for the automotive industry on the property.
Updated 2/2013

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Northwestern Barrel Green Infrastructure

The 18-acre Northwestern Barrel Superfund site is located on the Lake Michigan shoreline in South Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The site includes 13 acres of vacant property and a 5-acre portion of a residential area. A barrel reconditioning facility operated on the property from the early 1940s until 1964. Site operations included handling, washing and refurbishing steel drums and wooden barrels. Residuals and waste materials from the operations resulted in soil and ground water contamination at the site. EPA did not place the site on the National Priorities List. However, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) have conducted cleanup activities under EPA and Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources supervision. Cleanup activities have included removal of contaminated soil and waste, and installation of drain tile depressurization systems in on-site condominium buildings to collect and safely vent away any contaminated vapors from contaminated ground water beneath the buildings. These systems continue to operate. The PRPs also restored wetlands along the Lake Michigan shoreline and constructed erosion control. The PRPs completed cleanup activities in 2012. EPA and Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources are working with the PRPs to close out the site. Currently, City of South Milwaukee owns the vacant property at the site and residential use continues at the Marina Cliffs Condominiums.
Updated 2/2013

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Omega Hills North Landfill Alternative Energy

The 83-acre Omega Hills North Landfill Superfund site is located in Germantown, Wisconsin, outside of Milwaukee. From 1977 until 1982, the State of Wisconsin licensed the landfill on site to accept hazardous wastes. The landfill accepted 5,000 tons of hazardous waste and 15 million gallons of liquid waste each year from over 250 Wisconsin industries. The landfill stopped accepting solid waste in 1982 and liquid waste in 1983. Incorrect operation of the landfill’s leachate collection system resulted in ground water contamination. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. The landfill stopped accepting all wastes and closed in 1989. Under state oversight, the site’s owner conducted cleanup activities at the site. The site owner installed additional underground walls and a new system to collect leachate in order to prevent leachate from entering ground water. The site owner also installed a pretreatment plant for leachate. A landfill methane to electricity project begun in 1985 provides power via gas turbine electric generators. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1996.
Updated 2/2013

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Sauk County Landfill Alternative Energy

The Sauk County Landfill Superfund site is located in the Township of Excelsior, Wisconsin. The landfill occupies about 14 acres of a county-owned 320-acre parcel of land. Sauk County operated the site as a municipal landfill from 1973 to 1983. During that time, site operators disposed of municipal, commercial and industrial wastes at the site. The landfill contains approximately 750,000 cubic yards of waste, including 200,000 tons of foundry sand. Sauk County closed the landfill in 1983, and capped it with two feet of clay on the top and one foot of clay on the sides. EPA later investigated the site in 1984 and 1985 and found a plume of ground water contamination including volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and metals. Based on the presence of site-wide contamination, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List in 1989. Site cleanup activities include the installation of a multi-layered soil cap and gas extraction system at the landfill as well as ground water monitoring. Ground water data, collected over the past several years, indicates that ground water quality continues to improve down gradient of the landfill. The installation of 12 microturbines in June 2003 allowed the landfill to begin converting methane gas into electricity. Methane gas is an energy source collected from the landfill. Today, the facility has expanded to include 24 microturbines and sells enough electricity back to the utility to power over 300 homes. The facility is currently the largest landfill microturbine installation east of the Rockies.
Updated 2/2013

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Scrap Processing Co., Inc.

The 2-acre Scrap Processing Co., Inc. Superfund site is located in Medford, Wisconsin. Since the 1940s, the site has operated as a scrap yard, collecting scrap cars, aluminum and other waste metals. From 1955 to 1974 and periodically until 1981, site operations included reclaiming lead from lead and acid batteries. Site investigations identified soil and sediment contamination at the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. From 1984 until 1986, the site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) conducted cleanup activities under EPA oversight, including draining and disposal of liquid wastes from the unlined disposal pond on site and removal of contaminated soil and sediment. In 1994, the PRP removed additional contaminated soil and disposed of it at an off-site facility. Operation of the scrap yard continues at the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Tomah Armory
Site photo

The 10-acre Tomah Armory Superfund site is located in Tomah, Wisconsin. The City of Tomah operated an open, unlined landfill at the site from the late 1940s until 1955. The city sold a portion of the site in 1968 to the Wisconsin Department of Military Affairs (WDMA) for construction of the Wisconsin Army National Guard (ARNG) armory. The armory supports activities associated with the administration, logistical support and readiness of the unit. Prior to the purchase, parties removed a portion of the landfill and disposed of the materials at an off-site facility in order to construct buildings for the armory. Investigations in the 1980s identified soil and ground water contamination at the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. In 1996 and 1997, the site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) worked with surrounding property owners to place land use restrictions on impacted properties. Additionally, the city connected residents impacted by ground water contamination to the public water supply. In 1997, EPA selected a cleanup plan of no further action at the site, except for ground water monitoring to ensure that ground water continued to not pose a risk. The PRP continues ground water monitoring and cap maintenance at the site. The Wisconsin ARNG continues operation of the armory at the site. Additionally, the City of Tomah operates a wastewater treatment plant.
Updated 2/2013

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Tomah Fairgrounds

The Tomah Fairgrounds Superfund site is located in Tomah, Wisconsin. The site includes 15 acres of a 37-acre fairground. The City of Tomah operated the site as an open, unlined dump, accepting both industrial and municipal wastes from 1955 until 1960. Waste disposal methods included removing surface soil, landfilling waste materials, replacing the surface soil to cover the wastes and re-grading. Site operations also included burning wastes before burial. EPA investigations confirmed low-level ground water and soil contamination at the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. In 1996, the city placed land use restrictions on the site to limit use to recreational uses only. The city also instituted controls on the Tomah Fairgrounds and the area surrounding the fairgrounds, restricting use of ground water. Additionally, the city entered into an agreement with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) to monitor the ground water in and around the site. Following these activities, EPA selected a plan of no further action at the site, except continued ground water monitoring. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2001. Grass covers the site. During fairground events, the City uses the site as a parking lot.
Updated 2/2013

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Waste Research & Reclamation Co.

The 9-acre Waste Research & Reclamation Co. Superfund site is located in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. A roofing company operated at the site from the 1970s until 1981. The roofing company’s waste handling practices resulted in contamination of ground water, soil and surface water at the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Following site investigations, EPA transferred the site to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) program. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1993. Waste Research & Reclamation Co. (WRR) bought the site in 1981. WRR continues to operate reclamation and recycling businesses at the site. WRR’s sister company also operates on site.
Updated 2/2013

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