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Sites in Reuse in Arkansas

Frit Industries

The 30-acre Frit Industries Superfund site is located in Walnut Ridge, Arkansas. Since 1973, Frit Industries has manufactured micronutrients and trace element additives for fertilizer. In 1979, a fire consumed portions of the facility, resulting in the release of 81,000 gallons of water contaminated with heavy metals. The contaminated water caused a fish kill in nearby Coon Creek. Operations at the site have caused further runoff problems, possible ground water contamination and air pollution. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included the removal of contaminated soil. Since 1981, Frit Industries has studied runoff, the potential for ground water contamination and the buildup of heavy metals in the sediments of drainage ditches and Coon Creek. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1997 and deferred the site to the state Resource Conservation and Recovery Act program. Frit Industries continues to manufacture fertilizer micronutrients on site.
Updated 10/2013

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Jacksonville Municipal Landfill
Site photo

The City of Jacksonville, Arkansas purchased the Jacksonville Municipal Landfill site in 1960 and operated it as a municipal landfill until 1973. Operators closed the landfill in 1973 when the Arkansas Department of Pollution Control and Ecology (ADPC&E), now known as the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality, refused to grant a landfill permit due to the high water table and poor drainage. In 1986, the City of Jacksonville fenced the site to prevent public access. In 1987, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1999, the city put restrictive covenants in place to keep residents from disturbing the soil cover in the excavated areas and from using the on-site ground water. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2000. The city continues to restrict access to the site and conduct operation and maintenance activities. The site encompasses approximately 40 acres of an 80-acre tract of land and is used for recreational purposes, such as hunting.
Updated 11/2012

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Mid-South Wood Products
Site photo

The 57-acre Mid-South Wood Products Superfund site is located in Mena, Arkansas. Past site activities included sawmill and wood preserving operations. The Nebraska Bridge Supply and Lumber Company developed the site as a wooden post and pole production facility in the late 1930s. In 1955, Nebraska Bridge Supply and Lumber Company, operating under the name of Three States Lumber Company, installed a pressure-treating system that preserved wood with creosote. Wood preservatives used on site included creosote, pentachlorophenol (PCP) and copper chromium arsenate (CCA). Site operators improperly handled and disposed of these preservatives on site during wood treating and milling operations. Investigations triggered by a 1976 fish kill downstream from the site found that site activities resulted in the contamination of ground water, surface water and sediment with PCP, arsenic and chromium. In 1983, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA documented a cleanup plan for the site in a 1986 Record of Decision (ROD). Cleanup activities included the excavation, consolidation and capping of contaminated soil an on-site landfill, installation of a ground water recovery and treatment system and ground water monitoring. Fencing and land use controls restrict use of the property. Cleanup activities began in 1988 and ended in 1989. Wood treating operations ceased in 1990. A new owner has since purchased the property and currently uses the site to store roofing materials.
Updated 10/2013

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Mountain Pine Pressure Treating

The 95-acre Mountain Pine Pressure Treatment Superfund site in Plainview, Arkansas, has several inactive, abandoned wood pressure-treating facilities that operated from 1962 until 1986. About 45 acres of the property is timberland and the remainder is grassland. Wood treating processes at three on-site facilities led to soil contaminated with metals and pentachlorophenol (PCP). EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in July 1999. EPA’s cleanup action included treating about 24,000 cubic yards of soil. EPA awarded the Town of Plainview a Superfund Redevelopment Initiative grant in 2001 to assist the town in developing potential reuse options for the site. The Town of Plainview developed a Land Use Development Plan, which assisted EPA in selecting a cleanup plan most appropriate for the town's reuse plans. In 2004, an on-site groundbreaking ceremony commemorated the commencement of construction for a steel plant, marking the site’s return to productive industrial reuse. The steel company has since gone out of business. The mulch company Mulch and More now occupies the site, employing approximately 10 people.
Updated 11/2012

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Vertac, Inc.
Site photo

The Vertac, Inc. site is located 15 miles northeast of Little Rock, near Jacksonville, Arkansas. The federal government built the first industrial facilities at the site during the 1930s and 1940s as part of the sprawling Arkansas Ordinance Plant munitions complex. Over the next forty years, chemical manufacturing facilities also produced insecticides and herbicides on site. Decades of improper waste disposal and production control practices led to soil and ground water contamination at the site. Following initial environmental investigations, EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup actions included the consolidation of contaminated debris, the excavation and disposal of tons of dioxin-contaminated soil in an on-site landfill and the incineration of drummed wastes. The southern portion of the site is a secure, fenced area comprised of the landfill, a wastewater treatment facility and the operating ground water pump-and-treat system. Deed restrictions are also in place for this area of the property. Following the completion of surface cleanup activities in 1998, the City of Jacksonville acquired the northern section of the property in 2000. A Superfund Redevelopment Initiative Pilot grant enabled the city to investigate and ultimately pursue different reuse options. Today, site reuses include a recycling center, office space and storage for the city’s Street Department, a fire department training facility, a driver training pad, a recycling education park, and a police firing range. Construction is underway for a new police and fire training center, City of Jacksonville Police Department facilities, and an emergency operations center and community safe room for use during severe weather. The city is also exploring how to turn part of the site into community green space with sidewalks and picnic tables.
Updated 11/2012

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