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Sites in Reuse in Louisiana

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Agriculture Street Landfill

The Agriculture Street Landfill Superfund site is located in the eastern section of the City of New Orleans, Louisiana. The city first authorized use of the 95-acre site as a dump in 1909, when the city was engaged in an effort to phase out the dumping of municipal wastes and trash into various nearby canals and into the Mississippi River. The landfill remained open until the city constructed two incinerators in 1957. The landfill reopened in 1965 for approximately one year for a burning and disposal area for debris created by Hurricane Betsy. From the 1970s through the late 1980s, approximately 47 acres of the site were developed for private and public uses and currently support 67 single-family homes, multiple-family dwellings, retail businesses, an elementary school, a community center, a recreation center and an electrical substation. The rest of the site, approximately 48 acres, remains undeveloped and heavily vegetated. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1994. Prior to 1994, access to the undeveloped portion of the former landfill was unrestricted, allowing unauthorized waste disposal and exposure to contaminants. Between 1994 and 1997, EPA excavated and disposed of nearly 70,000 tons of material, replaced this material with over 125,000 cubic yards of clean sand backfill, capped and restored the site. EPA also replaced or repaired fences, gates, asphalt and concrete roadways, driveways, and sidewalks removed or damaged during the cleanup actions.
Updated 11/2012

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American Creosote Works, Inc. (Winnfield Plant)

The 34-acre American Creosote Works Superfund site is located in Winnfield, Louisiana. From 1901 to 1979, various companies conducted wood treatment operations on site. In 1981, Stallworth Timber Company purchased the site and resumed wood treatment operations at the site on a smaller scale. Operations at the site resulted in contamination in soil and storage areas on site. Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality site inspections between 1982 and 1986 identified chemical spillage, abandoned pits and containers and obvious off-site contamination. In December 1991, Stallworth Timber Company notified EPA that Reinhardt Investments had purchased the property. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1992. Cleanup activities included destruction of liquid contaminants, soil caps, soil treatment and monitoring of ground water and ecology. EPA is working with the City of Winnfield to transition the site to industrial use. Currently, a local construction firm uses about a third of this portion of the site to store heavy equipment.
Updated 10/2013

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Bayou Bonfouca Green Infrastructure
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Before becoming a popular attraction for boaters and outdoor enthusiasts, not to mention the location of city public offices, the Bayou Bonfouca Superfund site in Slidell, Louisiana, was an abandoned fire-singed piece of property with a legacy of contamination. American Creosote Works, Inc., a manufacturer of wood preservatives, operated on the site for almost 100 years until a fire destroyed the plant in the early 1970s. The fire ruptured on-site storage tanks, which added to the site’s contamination, building on years of contamination from regular plant operations. Past practices had released contaminants into the soil and water of the bayou and surrounding area. In 1983, EPA added Bayou Bonfouca to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA began the cleanup with a $140 million source removal effort in 1993. Additional cleanup actions included the dredging of Bayou Bonfouca’s contaminated sediments, on-site incineration of contaminated soils and sediments, and the extraction and treatment of contaminated ground water. During cleanup, EPA constructed several buildings on site to house equipment. Once EPA completed the cleanup, EPA transferred ownership of the buildings to the City of Slidell. Ground water treatment began in 1991 and continues to reduce the volume of contaminated ground water and prevent migration. The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ) now maintains the site and performs routine ground water monitoring. Today, the efforts of site owners, LDEQ, EPA and the city, have restored over a mile of the Bayou for aquatic life and recreational and public reuse. The city installed a public boat launch on the north shore of Lake Ponchartrain, which improved access for boaters and other outdoor enthusiasts. In addition, the 54-acre prime waterfront property, donated to the City by its former owners, houses the City’s public operations offices and other city services. The city is also considering future site additions such as a hiking and biking trail.
Updated 11/2012

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Central Wood Preserving Co.

The 17-acre Central Wood Preserving Co. Superfund site is located in East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana. From the 1950s to 1973, the Central Creosoting Company operated a wood treating facility at the site. Over time, wood treating products contaminated site soils, sediments and ground water. In 1991, the company filed for bankruptcy and closed the facility. Initial cleanup actions included removing tanks and contaminated soils near the main facility and installing a fence around the site to restrict access. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1999. Additional cleanup work completed since 1999 includes treating contaminated soils, filling excavated areas with clean soil, replanting these areas, and monitoring ground water. EPA worked with the community to integrate future use considerations into site cleanup and restoration plans. When EPA placed the property on the NPL, the Police Jury, in conjunction with EPA, developed a cooperative agreement for the preparation of a site redevelopment and reuse plan. Site grading and planting of Loblolly pine seedlings, Cherrybark Oak trees and grasses were completed in a manner that aligned with the East Feliciana Parish site reuse plan. One area of the property was left free of trees for a baseball field proposed in future reuse plans. While the parish has not yet been able to implement the reuse plan, the site is in beneficial reuse. The East Feliciana Parish uses the site as a staging area to hold brush and wood debris collected after hurricane/storm-related events (tree and limb debris only), and also brush and wood debris collected from residential tree maintenance. While site access need not be restricted based on the remaining contamination levels, the site is fenced and gates kept locked to prevent illegal dumping and unauthorized access.
Updated 5/2014

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Highway 71/72

The 215-acre Highway 71/72 Refinery Superfund site is located in Bossier City, Louisiana. Between 1923 and 1929, the Louisiana Oil Refining Corporation built a refinery for the production of home heating and fuel oil. The refinery ceased operations between 1944 and 1948, but the site continued to serve as a petroleum storage and distribution facility. In the mid-1950s, parties dismantled, removed and sold the refinery. In the mid-1960s, on-site construction began for interstate highway corridor I-20. The site owner began voluntary site cleanup efforts in 1966, but soon after the initial property cleanup and construction of the I-20 corridor, redevelopment of the site increased. Today, the refinery is gone and the site includes single-family homes, apartments, commercial buildings and light industrial establishments. About 3,500 people live within the former refinery boundaries. After the discovery of additional soil and ground water contamination in the mid-1980s, EPA and community leaders implemented a cleanup approach that accounted for the existing residents and businesses on the site. The cleanup plan included the removal of contaminated material; ground water cleanup, monitoring and use restrictions; indoor air pollution mitigation; and any necessary corrective action for all site-related contamination discovered during future earthmoving operations. EPA never finalized the site on the National Priorities List (NPL); instead, EPA is addressing the site using EPA’s Superfund Alternative approach. EPA allows structures it determines to be protective of human health and the environment to remain on site. EPA only requires additional soil cleanup if parties discover buried waste during future construction. For example, the demolition and excavation of a former hotel structure property allowed cleanup crews to access buried refinery waste. Construction of a new hotel complex began in November 2011, once construction crews completed the removal of buried refinery waste. Developers plan to complete the hotel complex in 2012. The complex will include an extended stay national brand hotel, a second national brand hotel, a swimming pool and a courtyard area.
Updated 11/2012

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Mallard Bay Landing Bulk Plant

The 10-acre Mallard Bay Landing Bulk Plant (MBLP) Superfund site is located in Cameron Parish, northeast of Grand Chenier, Louisiana. The site consists of two 5-acre tracts of land (referred to as the MBLP East and West facilities) separated by Talen’s Marine, an active marina and dock. From early 1980 through 1983, the MBLP facility operated as a crude oil refinery. In 1985, under new ownership, the facility resumed crude oil refining operations. The facility continued operations until early 1987, when the owners filed for bankruptcy and the facility closed. In 1993, an inspection revealed oily liquids and sludges present in several tanks and other environmental concerns. In 1998 and 1999, EPA conducted a range of cleanup activities, including the removal and off-site disposal of 866,304 gallons of oil and waste material from on-site tanks. In 2000, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) to address remaining site contamination. In 2003 and 2004, EPA removed all remaining tank sludges, contaminated soil and on-site structures. Cleanup levels allow a full range of uses at the site, including residential. Currently, Talen’s Marine is using the site as a staging and storage area.
Updated 11/2012

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