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Sites in Reuse in Kansas

57th and North Broadway Streets Site

The 57th and North Broadway Streets site includes residential, industrial and commercial areas in Wichita, Kansas. Past activities at nearby businesses, including an oil refining plant, trucking company, abandoned gas station and abandoned paint factory, contaminated site ground water and soil with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and heavy metals. In response to the discovery of site contamination, EPA began providing bottled water to affected residents and small businesses in 1990. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1992. In 1994, two potentially responsible parties provided affected residents with connections to public water services. EPA selected a cleanup plan for the site in two Records of Decision (RODs) dated 1998 and 1999. Cleanup activities included in-well stripping of the site’s contaminated ground water and soil vapor extraction to address contaminated soil. Following additional site investigations, EPA changed the selected remedy to better address site contamination. The new remedy is ongoing. EPA’s cleanup plan allowed the continued residential, public, industrial and commercial use of the site. These uses include many single family residences, a used oil re-refinery, trucking firms, a municipal waste water treatment plant, an insurance impound lot, a school bus facility and other small business and agricultural uses.
Updated 2/2014

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Big River Sand Co.
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The Big River Sand Co. Superfund site is located in Wichita, Kansas. The 123-acre former sand and gravel mining operation sits one-half mile west of the Arkansas River. During the 1970s, site operators disposed of about 2,000 drums of paint-related waste on the site next to a five-acre sand quarry lake. In 1978, the Big River Sand Company bought 80 acres of the site. In 1982, under the sales agreement and a court order the previous owner, the firm started moving the drums to its side of the property. The State of Kansas’ investigation in 1982 verified that many of the drums on site were damaged, corroded and leaking. Waste solvents and paint sludge from several drums contained metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). State analysts also found solvents and heavy metals in nearby residential wells in 1982 and 1984. From 1982 to 1984, the state provided oversight of the removal and cleanup activities performed by the property owner. Cleanup activities included the off-site landfilling of 40 cubic yards of hazardous paint sludge and the recycling of 10,000 gallons of solvents. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. In 1988, a Record of Decision (ROD) determined No Further Action was required for soil and ground water cleanup. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1992. Currently, a sand quarry and junkyard operate on the site.
Updated 1/2013

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Chemical Commodities, Inc Green Infrastructure
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The Chemical Commodities, Inc. (CCI) Superfund site is located in the city of Olathe, Kansas. CCI was a chemical brokerage facility that operated at the site from 1951 until 1989. CCI conducted recycling activities with a filter press, which often spilled or leaked the hazardous chemicals passing through it. In addition, surrounding companies performed chemical repackaging and storage activities on the property. CCI stored chemicals of all types on the property in aboveground and underground storage tanks and drums. Nearby residents reported many fires and explosions at the site during the 1960s and 1970s. In response, the City of Olathe Fire Department cited CCI for unsafe conditions. EPA added the site to the Superfund National Priorities List (NPL) in 1994 and selected a cleanup plan in 2005. Cleanup activities included removing and disposing of contaminated soil, putting land use controls in place, treating and managing ground water contamination, and maintaining a vapor control system. The potentially responsible parties worked with EPA and other organizations to develop a walk-through educational natural habitat for Monarch butterflies on the site. Participating organizations include Monarch Watch, the Pollinator Partnership, Monarch Joint Venture, Wildlife Habitat Council and the CCI Community Advisory Group. Monarch Watch is an outreach program focused on education, research and conservation of monarch butterflies. The Pollinator Partnership is an outreach program that promotes the health of pollinators, critical to food and ecosystems, through conservation, education, and research. The Monarch Joint Venture is a partnership of federal and state agencies, non-governmental organizations, and academic programs working together to support and coordinate efforts to protect the monarch migration across the lower 48 United States. The Wildlife Habitat Council is a nonprofit, non-lobbying group of corporations, conservation organizations and individuals dedicated to restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat, protecting biodiversity and educating communities. The site includes habitat for birds, bees and butterflies; a tagging station for migrating butterflies; and informational kiosks along a walking trail. An October 2012 ribbon-cutting ceremony formally opened the former CCI Superfund site as the new Pollinator Prairie. The site provides a beautified landscape for the surrounding neighborhood and offers the local community an educational opportunity to learn the importance of pollination.
Updated 10/2013

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Cherokee County Green Infrastructure
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Native grasses, streams and wildlife have replaced barren rock and gravel at the Cherokee County Superfund site in Cherokee County, Kansas. One hundred years of lead and zinc mining left the land looking like the desolate surface of the moon, strewn with contaminated debris and soil that caused the contamination of area ground water. As a result, EPA added the site to its National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. EPA took action to prevent the area’s dangerous levels of lead, cadmium and zinc from further endangering nearby residents, vegetation and wildlife and damaging the area's soil, surface water and ground water. In 1993, after ensuring that area residents with private wells had safe drinking water, EPA consolidated surface mine wastes and buried them on site in abandoned shafts and mine pits. Remedial workers covered land with clean soil, diverted streams to avoid the stored wastes and planted the entire site with native vegetation. In 2009, the site received $14.5 million in American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) funds, which EPA is using to support cleanup activities at the Badger, Lawton, Baxter Springs and Treece sub-sites. The ARRA funding supports ongoing cleanup efforts and will enable EPA to complete the project in about seven fewer years than originally anticipated. Today, EPA cleanup has restored a 25 square-mile portion of the 115 square-mile site to its natural state as a wildlife habitat and restoration efforts continue. Cleanup of this site has preserved the delicate natural environment and reduced human health risks from contamination.
Updated 1/2013

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Fort Riley
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The 100,656-acre Fort Riley Superfund Site is located in northeast Kansas. The site occupies portions of Clay, Geary and Riley counties. Since 1953, the U.S. Army has owned and operated the site. Investigations in the 1970s and 1980s identified the release of hazardous substances, both actual and potential. Sources of contamination included landfills, open burning and detonation range areas, incinerators, military munitions response program sites, specialty shops (printing, dry cleaning and furniture) and pesticide storage facilities. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Cleanup activities include ground water treatment, restrictions on land use, monitoring, and soil excavation and disposal or treatment. The U.S. Army continues to use the site for military training, equipment supply and maintenance activities.
Updated 10/2013

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Strother Field Industrial Park

The 2-square-mile Strother Field Industrial Park Superfund site is located near Winfield and Arkansas City, Kansas. Until 1946, the site operated as a military facility for aircraft construction and maintenance. During the U.S. Army's tenancy, land uses on site were typical of a military air base, including aircraft maintenance and support, housing and barracks, and related personnel facilities. Site operators disposed of various industrial wastes in two on-site landfills. In August 1982, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) detected dissolved organic solvents in water supply wells at the site during an on-site survey. Additional site investigations verified site-wide soil and ground water contamination due to previous on-site operations. EPA issued a cleanup plan in 1996. This plan included ground water extraction and treatment and ground water monitoring to show the progress of natural attenuation. In addition, EPA capped two areas with concrete to help prevent the movement of precipitation and surface water runoff through area soils. The site now consists of about 30 industrial and commercial businesses, as well as two inactive solid waste landfills. Much of the land remains undeveloped.
Updated 1/2013

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Wright Ground Water Contamination

The Wright Ground Water Contamination Superfund site is located in Wright, Kansas. In 1988, sampling from a private well identified contamination at the site. The individual who collected the sample notified the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) following the discovery of pesticides, heavy metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the ground water sample. KDHE conducted further sampling in wells throughout Wright, confirming area-wide ground water contamination. Since Wright did not have a municipal water supply, all residents received water from private wells. As a result, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1996. A 1997 EPA removal action provided a municipal water line for the citizens of Wright. EPA issued a cleanup plan in 2007, including natural attenuation, a ground water monitoring program and institutional controls.
Updated 1/2013

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