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Sites in Reuse in Utah

Davenport and Flagstaff Smelters Green Infrastructure

The Davenport and Flagstaff Smelters Superfund site is located in unincorporated Salt Lake County near Sandy, Utah, about 15 miles southeast of Salt Lake City. The site is in a residential and commercial area at the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon. The Davenport, McKay and Flagstaff smelters operated on the site throughout the 1800s. In 1991, the discovery of ladle casts in the Little Cottonwood Creek, near the Flagstaff Smelter location, prompted a study of historical smelter sites in the Salt Lake Valley. During investigations performed in 1992 by EPA and in 1994 by UDEQ, elevated concentrations of arsenic and lead were detected in soil at both smelter locations. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in April 2003. The residential area cleanup at the site was conducted from 2004 to 2008 by EPA under removal authorities. In 2006, under an agreement and with oversight by EPA and UDEQ, Little Cottonwood Canyon Partners LLC cleaned up a portion of the site to be developed into residential lots. A commercial area (restaurant) and undeveloped land designated as a watershed protection area were cleaned up under UDEQ lead in 2011. All the cleanups included the excavation, treatment when necessary, and proper disposal of contaminated soils. The site is in continued use as an established and developing residential area, a restaurant and watershed protection zone.
Updated 2/2013

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Eureka Mills
Site photo

The Eureka Mills Superfund site is located about 80 miles southwest of Salt Lake City, Utah. The historic mining site includes Eureka, a city of 800 residents, and some nearby areas. Mining activities started in the area in 1870, following the discovery of silver, lead and minerals. Parties extensively mined the area until 1958. Eureka has since suffered an economic decline as the result of the boom and bust cycles inherent in the mining industry. Another challenge Eureka has faced is legacy of mining contamination spread throughout the community. EPA started cleanup actions in 2000 and 2001 after EPA and the state confirmed high levels of contamination in the area. In 2002, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). Between 2001 and 2010, EPA completed the cleanup of more than 700 properties in Eureka. Other cleanup actions included capping mine waste piles near Eureka, constructing a disposal cell for contaminated soils, implementing institutional controls, and undertaking public health actions. With $26.5 million in funding provided under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009, EPA was able to complete site cleanup activities a year ahead of schedule. Since the Superfund site boundaries included the entire city, many properties in Eureka were already in use before and during the Superfund cleanup and remain in use now that EPA has completed the cleanup.
Updated 2/2013

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Hill Air Force Base

The Hill Air Force Base (AFB) Superfund site is an active U.S. Air Force base located in northern Utah, about 30 miles north of Salt Lake City. Established in 1940 as Hill Field, Hill AFB covers 6,670 acres across two counties and includes base residential housing. The base also administers environmental activities at the Utah Test and Training Range and Little Mountain Test Annex facilities. The processes personnel used in maintaining equipment and supporting flight-training missions produced a variety of wastes. Hill AFB began investigating releases in 1976, when a nearby resident reported an orange discharge from a spring on his property near the base boundary. EPA placed Hill AFB on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. The U.S. Air Force, the state and EPA are cooperatively investigating and cleaning up this contamination. Since the 1990s, parties have undertaken numerous site investigations and cleanup actions. Site investigations, cleanup and monitoring efforts continue. Numerous reuse and redevelopment activities are currently in progress on the west side of Hill AFB, known as the West-Side Redevelopment area.
Updated 2/2013

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Jacobs Smelter
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Waterman Smelting Works and Jacobs Smelter were both located in an industrial area known for smelting operations in the late 1800s in the northwest end of Stockton, Utah. Both operated in the 1870s and Waterman Smelting Works continued operations until 1886. The Chicago Smelter opened on the eastern shore of Rush Lake, two miles south of Stockton in 1873, and operated until the fall of 1880. These historic smelter operations contributed to the contamination of soil and surface water. EPA discovered contamination at the site in 1995 and added the Jacobs Smelter Superfund site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2000. In 1999, EPA's Emergency Response branch cleaned up the former Jacobs Smelter location and 29 of the most-heavily contaminated residential properties. This cleanup area remains in residential reuse and is called Operable Unit (OU) 1 or OU1. EPA deleted the area from the NPL in 2001. In 2001, potentially responsible party contractors completed removal actions in OU2 at several lots within a new subdivision. In 2010, EPA conducted additional removal actions at four lots within the subdivision not adequately addressed during the 2001 removal action. The area is in continued residential use. The railroad company completed the on-site cleanup of contaminated soil along a railroad at OU3 in 1999. EPA deleted this area from the NPL in 2005 and railroad operations continue today. Cleanup actions were conducted in other portions of the site (OU4 and OU5) in 2008 and 2012.
Updated 2/2013

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Kennecott (North Zone)
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The Kennecott (North Zone) site is an industrial area at the north end of the Oquirrh Mountains, west of Salt Lake City, Utah. Starting in 1906, the Kennecott Utah Copper Company (Kennecott) used the area to process metals, including copper and lead. The wastes produced by mining activities at the site resulted in contamination of sludge, soils, surface water and ground water. This contamination forced a moratorium on well drilling in the area and the closure of contaminated drinking water wells. EPA proposed the site for the National Priorities List (NPL) in January 1994. In 1995, Kennecott, EPA and the state signed an agreement stating that Kennecott would continue the cleanup and in turn, EPA would postpone adding the site to the final NPL. Kennecott is cleaning up the site with oversight by state and federal agencies. Cleanup activities have included the excavation and on-site disposal of contaminated soils, sediments and sludges. Kennecott is currently treating ground water and residences and businesses are connected to public water supply lines. Today, Kennecott maintains active mining operations on a portion of the site. A portion of the site is in continued use by the residential community of Magna. In addition, residents continue to enjoy the recreational opportunities offered by the portion of the site bordering the Great Salt Lake.
Updated 2/2013

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Kennecott (South Zone)
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The Kennecott (South Zone) site is an industrial area along the edge of the Oquirrh Mountains, west of Salt Lake City, Utah. Mining activities at the site began in the 1860s and continue to the present at the large Bingham Canyon open-pit mine. Historic mining operations produced lead, zinc, silver, copper, molybdenum and gold ores. Starting in 1906, the Kennecott Utah Copper Company (Kennecott) also used the area to process metals. The wastes produced by mining and processing activities at the site resulted in contamination of sludge, soils, surface water and ground water. This contamination forced a suspension of well drilling in the area and the closure of contaminated drinking water wells. EPA proposed the site for the National Priorities List (NPL) in January 1994. Kennecott completed removal of more than 25 million tons of lead- and arsenic-contaminated mining wastes in 1999. In 2008, EPA officially withdrew its proposal to place the site on the NPL, after signing an agreement with Kennecott outlining future cleanup activities. Cleanup activities have included the excavation and on-site disposal of contaminated soils, sediments and sludges. The long-term treatment of contaminated ground water at the South Zone is ongoing. The Kennecott Land Company (KLC) has redeveloped 4,126 acres of the site into the Daybreak community. KLC designed the development to be a model of environmentally and socially responsible growth, with all 13,600 homes and 9.1 million square feet of commercial building space constructed in accordance with EPA Energy Star efficiency guidelines. The community also features 1,250 acres of parks, a recreational lake, pedestrian-friendly town centers, shops, restaurants, grocery stores, churches, schools and mass transit. Kennecott’s owner Rio Tinto also opened a LEED-certified corporate office within the Daybreak community. The Daybreak community continues to grow through development of public transportation corridors, additional homes, commercial businesses, light industry and agricultural land use.
Updated 2/2013

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Midvale Slag
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The 446-acre Midvale Slag Superfund site is located in Midvale City, 12 miles south of Salt Lake City, Utah. From 1871 to 1958, five smelters processed lead and copper ore at the site. Site operations left behind large amounts of slag containing toxic levels of heavy metals. Site investigations found contaminated ground water and soils in the area, including on residential properties. As a result, EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1991. EPA worked together with state agencies, Midvale City, local citizens and the site’s owner to link the site’s cleanup and redevelopment with a protective remedy and land revitalization goals. Midvale City became the first community in EPA Region 8 selected as an EPA Superfund Redevelopment pilot project. This led to the groundbreaking publication of the Bingham Junction Reuse Assessment and Master Plan in 2000. Today, Bingham Junction has become the thriving mixed-use development envisioned for the site by the community. The outcomes are striking: about 800 jobs, $1.8 million in annual property tax revenues and a $145 million increase in the value of the site property. Builders have completed over a 1,000 residential units on the site property and plan to complete approximately 1,000 more. The site also houses office buildings, a supermarket and other stores. FL Smidth, an international engineering company, operates Gold and Silver LEED-certified office and laboratory buildings on site and employs over 400 workers. Developers plan to create up to two million square feet of commercial office and retail space on the site. Sections of Bingham Junction’s Riverwalk Park have opened, providing the community with enhanced access to the Jordan River. Finally, to increase accessibility to the park and other commercial and residential areas of the site, crews completed the construction of a Utah Transit Authority (UTA) light rail station and a light rail track in the summer of 2011.
Updated 2/2013

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Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) Green Infrastructure
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The Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) Superfund site is located in rural San Juan County, in and near the City of Monticello in southeastern Utah. A vanadium mill operated on the property from 1942 until 1960. The mill produced uranium and vanadium for the U.S. nuclear weapons program. Milling activities generated thousands of cubic yards of ore tailings containing trace amounts of uranium. In 1989, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns the site and leads cleanup activities under a Federal Facilities Agreement with EPA and the state. DOE has removed the most heavily contaminated soil from the former mill site and supplemental areas. Ground water cleanup efforts continue. The site is extensive and can safely support a variety of uses with proper implementation and observance of land and ground water use restrictions. The site supports ranching, farming, residential and recreational land uses. In June 2000, after DOE completed the cleanup of the former mill site areas, DOE completed the transfer of 383 acres of land to the City of Monticello through the Federal Lands-to-Parks Program. The city then restored the mill site as a public park in accordance with an approved design, and landscaped the park with native plants. In 2003, EPA deleted several portions of the site, removing them from the NPL. By 2004, DOE and the city had successfully restored three backwater wetlands along Montezuma Creek, re-creating a meandering creek channel and planting it with willows to promote wetlands and riparian habitat for wildlife. In 2012, the USDOE sold 175.4-acres of excess property east of the Pond 4. The General Administration Service handled the property sale.
Updated 2/2013

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Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties

The 4-square-mile Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Superfund site consists of 424 private and commercial properties in and around the City of Monticello, Utah. A vanadium mill operated on the property from 1942 until 1960, producing uranium and vanadium for the U.S. nuclear weapons program. Milling activities generated thousands of cubic yards of ore tailings containing trace amounts of uranium. Contamination of properties is the result of multiple factors. First, contaminated dust from the tailings piles blew onto some of the adjacent properties. Additionally, residents improperly used tailings from the mill site as construction material, backfill and as sand mix in concrete. In 1986, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) led site cleanup activities under a Federal Facilities Agreement with EPA and the state. The cleanup included all properties within an 8-mile radius of the mill site and property owners beyond that range could choose to have their land assessed for cleanup as well. In 2000, DOE completed the cleanup of all affected properties and deleted the site from the NPL. EPA continues to conduct in-depth reviews of the site every five years.
Updated 2/2013

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Murray Smelter
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The Murray Smelter Superfund site in Murray City, Utah, is a Phoenix Award-winning example of excellence in Superfund redevelopment. This 142-acre former mineral processing site was once the largest lead smelter in the country. Site testing showed contaminated soil, surface water, ground water and sediment. EPA Region 8 and Murray City entered into a unique agreement. This agreement established a formal role for the city in identifying potential future land uses at the site, participating in the development of cleanup options, and implementing institutional controls. EPA and Murray City coordinated closely to simultaneously develop the site’s cleanup and redevelopment plans. Murray City brought together site property owners and potentially responsible party ASARCO to discuss the site’s redevelopment. The parties committed to installing cleanup structures, establishing institutional controls and following the Murray City General Land Use Plan. Based on outcomes from these discussions, EPA was able to select a remedy that incorporated consideration of the site’s anticipated future use. Contaminated soils would be disposed of off site or consolidated on site and capped. Ground water contamination is being monitored. Statistical studies conducted in 2012 have provided information regarding the natural attenuation of the contaminants in the ground water. Based on this information, the frequency of monitoring will be reduced but the length of time to monitor the ground water increase. Today, on-site reuse supports over 5,612 jobs and contributes more than $260 million in annual employment income to the local community. The site is home to a Utah Transit Authority light rail station with a 300-space parking lot and a designated connector road; the Inter-mountain Medical Center, a 1.5 million-square-foot, $362.5 million hospital facility; a commercial retail warehouse; a police training center; a school; a cement company; and assorted small businesses . EPA Region 8 and Murray City will continue to work together to promote the safe and beneficial reuse of the site as expansion of office space and shopping areas remains ongoing.
Updated 2/2013

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Ogden Defense Depot (DLA)

Ogden Defense Depot, a former military installation, is located in Weber County, about 40 miles north of Salt Lake City, Utah. The former installation covered about 1,139 acres. Activated in 1941, it served as a warehousing and distribution facility. Ogden Defense Depot was one of seven warehousing and distribution depots operated nationwide by the Defense Logistics Agency, or DLA. At one time, it served as a storage and distribution facility for medical, industrial, construction and electronic supplies; food; clothing; and petroleum products to military installations and other federal agencies. Because of soil and ground water contamination, EPA added Ogden Defense Depot to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. The U.S. Army is leading the cleanup under oversight from EPA and the state. The cleanup approach for Ogden Defense Depot called for removing contaminated soil and debris and treating ground water. In 1994, the U.S. Army completed the cleanup of soil and debris. Ground water treatment began that same year and continues. Congress approved Ogden Defense Depot as a Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Act installation in 1995. In 1997, the federal government deeded the installation to the City of Ogden. Today, the site operates as the Business Depot Ogden (BDO) business park. The BDO is currently leasing out units to about 60 companies. Uses at the business park have included light manufacturing, warehousing, medical-laser manufacturing, rail manufacturing, medical storage and food supplement production.
Updated 2/2013

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Ogden Railroad Yard
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The Ogden Railroad Yard Superfund site is located on the west side of the City of Ogden, about 41 miles north of Salt Lake City, Utah. For almost 150 years, the site has been the location of railway operations. Spills and improper handling of materials containing hazardous substances resulted in contaminated ground water, sediment, soil and sludge. Initial cleanup actions began in 1994. Extensive site investigations under EPA oversight began in the late 1990s. In 2004, EPA issued the site’s long-term cleanup plans, which called for capping contaminated lake sediments, removing contaminated soils and implementing institutional controls, among other actions. EPA also agreed to allow the contaminated ground water to recover naturally. Ongoing ground water monitoring has shown that the ground water contaminant levels are stable or decreasing. Modeling work conducted in 2012 provided information to determine additional wells could be installed in 2013. Today, the Utah Transit Authority (UTA) FrontRunner commuter rail line extends across the site. The rail line provides service from Pleasant View to Salt Lake City. UTA coordinated the line’s development with the site’s cleanup, working closely with EPA. Ultimately, UTA also located a flyover bridge and passenger station at the site. EPA has also worked with the community to integrate local reuse priorities with the site’s remedy. For example, the former 21st Street Pond property has been renamed Goode Ski Lake, and is being returned to use as a fishing area and a water skiing park. Awarded a prestigious Phoenix Award in 2011 for achievement of excellence in Superfund site reuse, the City of Ogden is also developing plans for new commercial development at the site. Originally constructed on the site in 1924, Union Station now houses four museums as well as an art gallery, shops, restaurant and a visitor center.
Updated 2/2013

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Pallas Yard
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The Pallas Yard Superfund site is located in Murray City, Utah, about 15 miles southeast of the Great Salt Lake. The site is an active railroad yard that currently includes five sets of tracks. Union Pacific and the Denver & Rio Grande railroads laid the original Pallas Yard rail lines around the turn of the century to support a growing smelter industry. During development of the rail yard, construction workers placed fill material contaminated with arsenic and lead underneath the tracks. The arsenic leached through the soil, eventually contaminating ground water. The Utah Transit Authority (UTA) purchased the site in 1995 as part of the TRAX Light Rail Transportation Project in preparation for the 2002 Winter Olympics. UTA, in partnership with EPA and the state, cleaned up the site. To clean up the site, UTA removed the contaminated soil and placed it in eight-foot high, capped berms built along the tracks to muffle sound of the passing trains. Since cleanup, UTA uses the site as a thoroughfare for TRAX. Ground water monitoring at the site continues.
Updated 2/2013

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Richardson Flat Tailings

The Richardson Flat Tailings is a proposed Superfund site spans about 258 acres near Park City, Utah. The site contains a 160-acre tailings pond that holds about 7,000,000 tons of tailings. The site consists of a tailings dam and an impoundment area, and is adjacent to Silver Creek and the surrounding watershed. Prior to the 1950s, mining companies extracted minerals and metals and left mine tailings, which are mining wastes containing heavy metals and other contaminants, on site. Between 1953 and 1982, United Park City Mines (UPCM) leased the site and their mines to various mining firms, including the Anaconda Copper Company and the American Smelting Company. These firms operated the mines, used the site for tailings disposal and left 450,000 tons of tailings on site. In 1989, EPA and state environmental officials found mining residues from the site entering Silver Creek. Additional investigations found ground water and surface water contamination in surrounding areas. EPA proposed the site for the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1992. Cleanup activities undertaken by UPCM included covering mine tailings, seeding the area with grass and improving runoff drainage ditches, and restoring habitat. EPA continues working with UPCM to clean up the site and restore impacted areas of Silver Creek. Creek restoration work will improve aquatic habitats, including wetlands and stream channels, and restore water quality. Crews will revegetate these areas with native plant species. Part of the site now includes land managed by the Bureau of Land Management and a former Union-Pacific railroad right-of-way that the Utah Division of Parks and Recreation currently manages as a recreational area.
Updated 5/2014

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Rose Park Sludge Pit
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The Rose Park Sludge Pit Superfund site is located at Rosewood Park in Salt Lake City, Utah. Utah Oil and Refining Company disposed of acidic waste sludge in an unlined pit on site from the 1930s until 1957. A petroleum refinery located east of the site served as the source of the waste material. Salt Lake City purchased the property in 1957. The city rediscovered the waste disposal site during expansion of the adjacent city park in 1976. The sludge pit covered an area of about 5 acres and the waste material extended as deep as 20 feet below ground surface. At the request of the State of Utah, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. The site cleanup plan involved the construction of a slurry wall around the site perimeter. Cleanup activities also included capping waste material to prevent exposure to the acid waste sludge and prevent further ground and surface water contamination. Following the successful cleanup of the site, EPA deleted the site from the NPL in June 2003. The City of Salt Lake identified the former Superfund site as an area to expand and improve the amenities of Rosewood Park. Residents of the Rose Park neighborhood frequently use this recreational park. EPA closely collaborated with the state, the City of Salt Lake and the responsible party to expand the park. The expansion included additional parking areas and a dog park, which was the first area in the neighborhood where dogs could play unleashed. As part of the park expansion, the city also built a new playground, exercise equipment and sidewalks and installed new landscaping. The city also converted a property adjacent to the west side of the site into a skate park. The expansion of the park onto the site has provided several added amenities to the community while improving remedy protectiveness by prohibiting motor vehicle access to the cap.
Updated 2/2013

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Sharon Steel Corp. (Midvale Tailings)
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The 470-acre Sharon Steel Corp. (Midvale Tailings) Superfund site is located in Midvale, Utah. Now known as Jordan Bluffs, the site originally housed a former smelting and ore milling facility that produced lead, copper, zinc and other metals from 1906 to 1971. Site investigations found contaminated ground water and soils on the site. As a result, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. There are two main areas of the site: 1) a capped 10-million cubic yard waste tailing pile consisting of approximately 270 undeveloped acres, and 2) approximately 200 acres and 600 residential and commercial properties. EPA and the State of Utah cleaned up the site by: fencing the site, stabilizing the banks of the Jordan River, spraying the tailings to control blowing dust; removing an old mill building; capping tailings and reclaiming surrounding areas; installing ground water monitoring wells on the perimeter of the site to ensure contaminated ground water is not migrating from the site; and removing contaminated soil from more than 600 mostly residential properties and replacement with clean soil. By 1999, workers completed site cleanup and EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2004. A wide range of redevelopment can occur on or off the cap, as long as a reuse plan demonstrates how the integrity and stability of the cap will be maintained and the institutional controls are followed. If deemed appropriate, the reuse plan can incorporate mixed uses including residential, office/commercial, business park/industrial and open space. The reuse plan must be specific to the development proposal under consideration at the time, and must be approved by the City of Midvale.
Updated 2/2013

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Tooele Army Depot (North Area)

The Tooele Army Depot (North Area) Superfund site is located in the City of Toole, 30 miles southwest of Salt Lake City, Utah. The site has operated as an active U.S. Army base since the early 1940s. Ammunition storage and equipment repair at the site resulted in contamination of soil and ground water. In 1990, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). The U.S. Army removed contaminated soil and explosives from portions of the site. During this time, the U.S. Army also built and began operating one of the country's largest ground water treatment plants to address the site’s ground water contamination. In 1996, the Army transferred a 41-acre portion of the site to a private party for use as an engine refurbishing plant. In 1999, the U.S. Army transferred a 1,700-acre portion of the site to the City of Toole’s Redevelopment Agency under the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Early Transfer Authority. The city’s redevelopment agency then sold the area to a commercial developer. The U.S. Army continues to use 22,000 acres of the site for conventional ammunition storage, maintenance and demilitarization. Operation and maintenance activities continue at the site.
Updated 2/2013

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