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Sites in Reuse in California

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Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (Building 915)

The Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (Building 915) Superfund site is located in Sunnyvale, California. Advanced Micro Devices (Building 915) is situated on a 25-acre parcel. Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) used the site for semiconductor manufacturing. Built on former agricultural land in 1973, Building 915 functioned as storage for waste solvents. In 1981, the company identified contaminants from leaking underground storage tanks in ground water wells on site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Cleanup activities included the excavation and removal of contaminated soil and the removal of a 47,000-gallon underground acid neutralization system. Extraction wells and pumps currently contain ground water contamination and ground water treatment continues at the site. EPA, together with the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, are also working with AMD on vapor intrusion investigations at and downgradient of the AMD property. In 2003, AMD transferred ownership of the property to Spansion LLC, a company specializing in flash memory devices. The company continued operations at the site in 2005.
Updated 2/2014

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Aerojet General Corp. Alternative Energy
Site photo

The Aerojet General Corp. (Aerojet) Superfund site covers about 5,900 acres near Rancho Cordova, 15 miles east of Sacramento, California. Since 1953, Aerojet and its subsidiaries have researched, designed and manufactured rocket engines and formulated a number of chemicals. Disposal and operating practices led to soil and ground water contamination. EPA listed the site on its National Priorities List (NPL) of contaminated sites in 1983. Since then, efforts have been underway to contain and address contaminated ground water using multiple ground water pump-and-treat systems. Aerojet is carrying out two EPA-approved cleanup plans to contain the ground water contamination, pumping-and-treating 25 million gallons of water per day. Aerojet is also investigating how to further prevent the spread of contaminants and to clean up soil and ground water contamination sources. In 2008, Aerojet began planning to convert a portion of its facility into a solar farm to help power the site’s extensive ground water cleanup program. Aerojet also viewed this as an opportunity to reduce the company’s carbon footprint and improve energy use as part of parent company GenCorp’s Sustainability Initiative. Installed in 2009 and 2010, 22 solar arrays now track the daily course of the sun, generating 6 megawatts (MW) of power. The electricity produced provides more than 20 percent of the energy needed to power the site’s ground water cleanup program. Aerojet continues to operate on this Superfund site and also has tenants using the site for a variety of office, commercial and light industrial activities. Aerojet has begun the planning process to re-use portions of its site for mixed-use development including residential and commercial transit-oriented uses.
Updated 2/2013

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Alameda Naval Air Station

The Alameda Naval Air Station Superfund site is located on Alameda Island, next to Alameda, California, along the eastern side of the San Francisco Bay. Now known as Alameda Point, the site is a closed U.S. Navy installation. The former installation covers approximately 1,600 acres of dry land and 1,000 acres of submerged land. Before becoming a naval facility in 1936, the site supported a borax processing plant, an oil refinery and an airport for Alameda. In 1936, the U.S. Navy acquired the area and used it to provide support services to fleet aviation activities until closing it in 1997. Past operations resulted in the contamination of ground water, surface water, soil and sludges. Contamination also threatened both fresh- and salt-water wetlands. EPA listed the air station as a Superfund site on EPA’s National Priorities List (NPL) in 1999. In 2001, the U.S. Navy and EPA signed a Federal Facility Agreement to investigate and clean up the site. The state signed the agreement in 2005. Since signing the agreement, the U.S. Navy has completed numerous investigations and cleanup actions. Investigations and cleanup actions continue. A year before the air station closed, the City of Alameda adopted the Naval Air Station Alameda Community Reuse Plan to guide the conversion of the former installation to civilian use. As part of the city’s reuse planning efforts, the City of Alameda hired consultants to develop reuse plans for two areas of the site with funding from the Superfund Redevelopment Pilot Program awarded in 2001. Today, the former installation includes a major airfield; a deep-water port; aircraft and ship maintenance facilities; 1,500 units of family and barracks-type housing; and industrial, retail, warehouse and recreational facilities.
Updated 2/2013

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Applied Materials

The 9-acre Applied Materials Superfund site (also known as the Applied Materials -Building 1 (AM1) Facility) is located in Santa Clara, California. A large industrial building occupies most of the site. Applied Materials began semi-conductor wafer manufacturing operations in the building in 1974. In 1983, monitoring wells on the site indicated the presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Leaking pipes leading to underground tanks associated with an acid neutralization system may have resulted in site contamination. In 1984, Applied Materials installed a system to pump and treat contaminated ground water. In 1985, Applied Materials excavated underground storage tanks and some of the surrounding soil. In 1987, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1990, EPA chose to continue using the existing pump-and-treat system. In 1993, potentially responsible parties determined that the surface soils are not contaminated and the ground water treatment system would address the saturated soils under the building. Ground water treatment continued through 2002. Ground water monitoring continues. In 2003, Applied Materials converted the building to offices and educational facilities, eliminating research and manufacturing activity on-site.
Updated 2/2013

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B.F. Goodrich
Site photo

The B.F. Goodrich Superfund site is located in Rialto, California, about 60 miles east of Los Angeles. In 1942, the U.S. Army used a portion of the site to store ammunition and weapons. After World War II, the land was sold and used by defense contractors and fireworks manufacturers. The firms included West Coast Loading Corporation, B.F. Goodrich Corporation, Pyrotronics and American Promotional Events. Operators from these companies handled perchlorate salts and other chemicals and disposed of chemical wastes on site. Eventually the chemicals seeped into the ground and contaminated the underground water supply. Many residents receive drinking water from the water supply underneath Rialto, so the site quickly became a priority candidate for cleanup. The California Regional Water Quality Control Board led initial efforts to respond to the contamination. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in September 2009 and released a cleanup plan for a portion of the site in 2010. Goodrich Corp. and Emhart Industries (a corporate successor to West Coast Loading Corporation) have both entered into agreements with EPA to pay for cleanup work at the site. While cleanup work continues, Pyro Spectaculars Inc. and American Promotional Events still operate and test fireworks on site.
Updated 10/2013

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Barstow Marine Corps Logistics Base

The Barstow Marine Corps Logistics Base Superfund site covers 5,687 acres east of Barstow, California. The site consists of three areas: the Nebo area, the Yermo area and the Rifle Range. The base was established at the Nebo location in 1942, when the U.S. Navy transferred command to the U.S. Marine Corps. The base has two major functions: providing equipment maintenance, repair, overhaul and rebuilding, and receiving, storing, maintaining, issuing and shipping materials. Vehicle-related and war surplus wastes made up the majority of historically site-generated wastes. Vehicle-related wastes include waste oils, grease, hydraulic fluids, fuels, battery acids, bilge waters and antifreeze. The maintenance, rebuilding and preservation of vehicles in the repair division generated a majority of the site’s industrial wastes. Some hazardous or suspected hazardous wastes were contained in war surplus materials received at the base, including ammunition, various sources of low-level radiation and chemicals such as pesticides, herbicides and raw materials. Investigations by the U.S. Marine Corps discovered 38 separate areas of contamination on the base, including contamination of site ground water with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and soil with contaminants including VOCs and heavy metals. In response to the discovery of area ground water contamination, an alternate drinking water supply was provided for personnel on the base. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Site cleanup activities included the excavating and treating contaminated soil and sludge, ensuring the integrity of surface features to control water infiltration, and containing the on-site landfill under a concrete cap. Continued ground water monitoring and the installation of fencing around the site ensure the effectiveness of the site’s remedy. Today, the Barstow Marine Corps Logistics Base supports U.S. Marine forces west of the Mississippi, as well as forces located in the Far East and Asia. The Nebo area currently functions as base headquarters and is the main facility for administration, storage, recreational activities, shopping and housing functions. The Yermo Annex is primarily a storage and industrial complex and the third site area consists of the base’s rifle and pistol ranges.
Updated 2/2013

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Beckman Instruments (Porterville Plant)

The Beckman Instruments (Porterville Plant) Superfund site is located in in Porterville, California, about 50 miles north of Bakersfield. The 160-acre site includes the 12-acre Beckman plant property and other privately owned commercial, agricultural and residential properties located to the west of the Beckman plant. The company has manufactured printed circuit boards and electronic instrument parts at the facility since 1968. Wastes generated from these operations included solvents, acid solutions and heavy metals. From 1974 until 1983, facility operators disposed of these wastes in an evaporation pond on site. This pond is the most likely source of ground water contamination in the area surrounding the Beckman facility. Investigators also identified lead contamination in the soil. In 1985, Beckman began operating a ground water pump-and-treat system and expanded the system in 1987. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. In 1989, EPA selected a cleanup plan, which included addressing contaminated soil and expanding the ground water treatment system. In 2005, EPA agreed to discontinue use of the ground water treatment system and allow the ground water to recover naturally. Ground water monitoring continues. The plant continues to operate.
Updated 3/2013

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Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base Alternative Energy
Site photo

The 125,000-acre Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base Superfund site is located on the northern edge of San Diego, California. Established in 1942, the base serves as a training facility for the U.S. Marine Corps and supports about 36,000 military personnel and 4,600 civilian employees. Military family housing and recreational areas occupy portions of the base as well. Throughout the base’s history, operators improperly disposed of raw sewage, burned solid waste, and mishandled various hazardous substances. Together, these actions created contaminated areas scattered throughout the 125,000-acre property. Between 1984 and 1988, the U.S. Navy assessed the base and identified soil and ground water requiring cleanup from decades of improper waste disposal practices. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in November 1989. From 1995 to 1997, the U.S. Marine Corps removed and treated contaminated soil from the base. They then installed several monitoring wells. The ground water supply, which provides drinking water for the entire base, currently meets drinking water standards. In addition, the U.S. Marine Corps built a protective cap over the base’s solid waste landfill. In 2010, Kyocera Solar constructed a solar array on the landfill. The alternative energy project generates up to 2.7 megawatts of power for on-site use. The U.S. Marine Corps continues to use the base as a training center.
Updated 10/2013

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Castle Air Force Base (6 Areas)

The 2,777-acre Castle Air Force Base (6 Areas) Superfund site is located in Merced, California. From 1941 until 1995, an air crew training facility operated on site. Initially, the U.S. Army used the base. In 1946, the U.S. Strategic Air Command assumed responsibility for the base. Aircraft maintenance, fuel management and fire training activities on the base generated waste, including fuel, oil, solvents and cleaners. U.S. Air Force personnel disposed of waste in pits at landfills around the base until 1977. U.S. Air Force personnel incinerated fuel and waste oil during fire training exercises on the base. These activities resulted in the contamination of ground water and soil. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. Cleanup activities included treatment of some soils, and excavation and disposal of tanks and some soils. Cleanup activities also included landfill cap maintenance, land use controls to prevent people from tampering with landfill caps, and ecological monitoring. Ground water cleanup activities included ground water treatment, closure of wells to prevent moving contaminated ground water between ground water layers, and ground water use controls to prevent the installation of ground water supply wells. The site achieved EPA’s Site Wide Ready for Anticipated Use (SWRAU) performance measure in 2007. In December 2006, complete transfer of the property occurred. The U.S. Air Force no longer owns property at the site. The County of Merced received over 1,900 acres of land, including the airfield. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the U.S. Bureau of Prisons, the City of Atwater and Castle Gardens Redevelopment also received land. Current and future land use at Castle Airport includes a civilian airport; educational, industrial, medical and housing facilities; and a federal prison. Commercial and educational entities, including AT&T Call Center, Big Creek Lumber and University of Merced, operate on site.
Updated 10/2013

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Coalinga Asbestos Mine Green Infrastructure
Site photo

The Coalinga Asbestos Mine Superfund site is located in western Fresno County, California. The site includes a 120-acre tract of land used for mining-related operations from 1962 until 1977 and a 107-acre area in the City of Coalinga that operated as an asbestos milling, manufacturing, storage and transportation center. The site shares the City of Coalinga operable unit (City OU) with the nearby Atlas Asbestos Mine Superfund site. Coalinga was founded because of the asbestos boom that centered on mining of the nearby Diablo Mountain Range. From 1957 to 1977, the city carved out a unique niche as a prime asbestos storage area. However, EPA discovered that the city's reserve of asbestos had migrated from the storage areas and polluted several buildings as well as soil and ground water throughout the city. This led EPA to add the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. As part of the City OU cleanup effort, potentially responsible parties demolished the storage buildings, excavated 26,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil and debris, and capped the site with an impermeable clay cover. These actions helped eliminate the risks from asbestos, making the property suitable for development. After cleanup, the city promoted the property, catching the eye of several developers. K-mart opened its new Coalinga store in 1992, providing almost 100 new jobs and a vital service to this community. The partnership between EPA and the city helped lead the way to the successful cleanup and reuse of this site. In 1998, EPA deleted the site from the NPL. Other developments have included a 43-unit apartment complex and a 47-lot subdivision. Following a 2006 site review, EPA conducted further site sampling to determine whether the City OU presented any exposure issues of concern. The results of the sampling showed that the cleanup of the site continued to be protective of human health and the environment and no further cleanup was necessary.
Updated 2/2013

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Coast Wood Preserving
Site photo

The 8-acre Coast Wood Preserving (CWP) Superfund site is located three miles south of Ukiah in northern California. Historically, CWP facility operators used a solution of sodium dichromate, copper sulfate, and arsenic acid to pressure-treat and preserve wood products. Over the years of operation, dripping and spillage of the chemical solution contaminated the soil and ground water on and off site. In 1983, CWP began treating ground water and conducting additional cleanup actions. That same year, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). Since the site’s listing, CWP has taken further cleanup actions to address soil and ground water contamination, including paving over soils to prevent water penetration. In 2004, CWP began using a different chemical solution for its wood treating operations. CWP continues to operate on the site. Long-term monitoring of site ground water continues.
Updated 2/2013

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Cooper Drum Co.

The 3.8-acre Cooper Drum Co. Superfund site is located in South Gate, California. From 1941 until 1992, Cooper Drum reconditioned closed-topped steel drums that previously held a variety of industrial chemicals. The reconditioning process consisted of flushing out and stripping the drums for painting and resale. Workers performed heavy duty cleaning called hard washing in the northeast portion of the site. Beginning in 1976, reconditioning activities took place within the present-day drum processing area located in the central portion of the site. Open concrete pits and trenches collected fluids generated by reconditioning and hard washing activities, resulting in contamination of soil and ground water beneath the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2001. Potentially responsible parties are performing the cleanup of soil and ground water contamination at the site under EPA oversight. The soil treatment system began operating in 2011. Ground water treatment systems began operating in 2012. In 2003, Cooper Drum ceased all drum processing operations and removed all drum processing equipment from the site. Afterward, a pallet company, a trucking and towing company, and two automotive repair/ salvage companies operated at the site. As of June 2006, the automotive repair/salvage companies moved operations off site and the pallet company expanded its operations to the entire property.
Updated 2/2013

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Crazy Horse Sanitary Landfill Alternative Energy

The 160-acre Crazy Horse Sanitary Landfill (CHL) Superfund site in northern Monterey County is located about five miles directly northeast of the City of Salinas. From the early 1970s until about 1982, a local manufacturing plant disposed of large quantities of rubber materials, carbon black, other fillers, oils and mixed solvents in an area of the site known as Module 1. The city installed a ground water pump-and-treat system in 1988 to mitigate the effects of the contamination. In 1990, EPA listed the landfill area as a site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Following the site’s listing, the city undertook a range of initial actions to address site contamination. EPA is currently reviewing the effectiveness of initial Superfund cleanup actions to determine whether the site needs additional cleanup measures. The CHL stopped accepting waste and closed to the public in May 2009. As part of the final landfill closure plan, the city revised the final cover to enable the future use of photovoltaic (PV) technology on the landfill cover system. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is currently conducting a feasibility study to evaluate renewable energy production at the site as part of the RE-Powering America’s Land initiative. In addition, beginning in 1987, Pacific Energy and then Covanta Energy operated a landfill gas collection system for electricity generation on the site. This system was recently dismantled and will likely be replaced by a similar system.
Updated 2/2014

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CTS Printex, Inc.
Site photo

The CTS Printex, Inc. Superfund site is located in Mountain View, California, northwest of Santa Clara. From 1966 to 1985, the manufacturing of printed circuit boards took place on a 5.5-acre property. Waste management practices resulted in soil and ground water contamination. CTS Printex began cleanup activities in 1985. In 1990, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). The site includes the former facility property and an area of impacted ground water extending beyond the former facility boundary. CTS Printex cleaned its waste collection system, removed contaminated soil and treated the underlying ground water. In 2006, a developer acquired the former CTS Printex property. Construction crews completed two phases of residential townhome development and are now completing a third. EPA worked closely with CTS Printex and the site developer to make sure the site could safely support residential development. Initial ground water treatment successfully removed much of the contamination. In 2011, EPA required additional actions to address ground water contamination as well as vapors that might enter into buildings located above contaminated ground water.
Updated 2/2013

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Del Amo

The 280-acre Del Amo Superfund site is located in Los Angeles, California, in an area known as the Harbor Gateway. The Del Amo synthetic rubber plant operated from about 1943 until 1972 and consisted of three separate plants dedicated to styrene, butadiene and rubber production. The manufacturing generated various sludge wastes and wastewaters. Site operators disposed of some of these wastes in unlined pits and unlined evaporation ponds on the property. In the 1970s, most of the site was transformed into an industrial park. The state began directing environmental investigations at the site in 1981 and then required the excavation and off-site disposal of waste material and soil from one of the waste pits. In 1997, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) to more fully investigate and clean up the site. Cleanup efforts to date have included capping the waste pits and extracting contaminated vapors from the soil beneath the waste pits. Soil cleanup beneath the waste pits continues. EPA is also working with potentially responsible parties (PRPs) to address contaminated ground water. Limited soil removal actions have also occurred throughout the site, during construction and redevelopment activities. All but about 10 of the 280 acres that make up the site have been developed for industrial and commercial uses, including light manufacturing, warehousing and offices.
Updated 3/2013

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Del Norte Pesticide Storage
Site photo

The 1-acre Del Norte Pesticide Storage Superfund site is located just north of Crescent City, California. From 1970 to 1981, Del Norte County operated a temporary pesticide storage area at the site and accepted containers from local agricultural industries. In the process, operators released contaminated waste and rinse water into an unlined basin. The contaminated shallow ground water threatened the residences, farmland and private wells surrounding the site. In 1984, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA removed contaminated soils and installed a water treatment system in 1989. The system removed about 95 percent of the contamination within the first four years of treatment. The California Department of Toxic Substances Control and the Del Norte County Department of Health and Human Services actively monitored the contamination. The spread of the low levels of the one remaining chemical was stopped by 2002, and EPA removed the site from the NPL in September 2002. The Del Norte County Agriculture Department office and related facilities are now located at the site. Del Norte County has been developing plans for using parts of the site to support land use growth in the surrounding area.
Updated 10/2013

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Fairchild Semiconductor Corp. (Mountain View Plant)
Site photo

The 56-acre Fairchild Semiconductor Corp. (Mountain View Plant) Superfund site is located in Mountain View, California. Fairchild Semiconductor operated at the site from 1968 to 1981. The site is part of the Middlefield-Ellis-Whisman (MEW) Study Area, which also includes the Raytheon Company Superfund site, the Intel Corp. – Mountain View Superfund site, and portions of the former NAS Moffett Field Superfund site where MEW and Navy ground water contamination has mixed. In the 1960s and 1970s, several industrial companies involved in semiconductor, electronics, and other manufacturing and research contaminated area soil and ground water. Operations at the former NAS Moffett Field also resulted in ground water contamination. Between 1986 and 1991, EPA listed these four sites on the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1989, EPA issued a cleanup plan to address soil and ground water contamination across the MEW Study Area. Soil cleanup actions are complete. Ground water treatment and monitoring continue. Efforts to address subsurface vapor intrusion into buildings are also underway. A prospective purchaser agreement between EPA and a developer helped facilitate the purchase and redevelopment of more than 38 acres of the Fairchild Semiconductor site by 1998. Google now occupies a number of properties at the Fairchild site.
Updated 3/2013

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Fairchild Semiconductor Corp. (South San Jose Plant)

The 22-acre Fairchild Semiconductor Corp. (South San Jose Plant) Superfund site is located about nine miles southeast of downtown San Jose, California. The site is a former semiconductor manufacturing facility. The facility operated from 1977 until 1983. Manufacturing operations required the use and storage of industrial solvents. In 1981, Fairchild discovered that an underground organic solvent waste tank had failed, resulting in soil and on- and off-site ground water contamination by a mixture of solvents. Afterward, Fairchild started several initial cleanup actions that have decreased ground water contamination in the area. After finding contamination in a nearby public water supply well, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. In 1992, EPA required a number of cleanup actions to address ground water and soil contamination. These included soil excavation, construction of a slurry cut-off wall surrounding the site, construction of a ground water pump-and-treat system, soil vapor extraction and treatment, ground water monitoring, and implementation of institutional controls. Fairchild completed the construction of the required cleanup systems in 1992. Fairchild completed the slurry cut-off wall around the site in 1986 to contain the contaminants within the site boundaries. Fairchild ended active cleanup in 1998. EPA is currently allowing ground water to recover using natural processes. The site was vacant from 1983 until companies redeveloped it between 1998 and 2000. The shopping area currently contains retail shops, restaurants and parking.
Updated 2/2013

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Firestone Tire & Rubber Co. (Salinas Plant)

The 256-acre Firestone Tire & Rubber Co. Superfund site is located in an agricultural area in Salinas, California. The Firestone Tire & Rubber Company used the facility for tire manufacturing from 1963 until 1980. During this period, factory operators used a variety of chemicals that contaminated the soil and ground water. After the facility closed, Firestone undertook interim cleanup measures, including constructing and operating a ground water treatment system and removing contaminated soil. In 1987, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) and required that Firestone expand its ground water treatment system. Ground water was successfully treated to meet the ground water standards. After the tire manufacturing facility closed, the site was developed into the Firestone Business Park that provides space for several small and medium-size businesses. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2005.
Updated 2/2013

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Fort Ord Alternative Energy
Site photo

The 28,000-acre Fort Ord Superfund site is located near Monterey Bay in northwestern Monterey County, California, about 80 miles south of San Francisco. A former military installation, the site is next to the cities of Seaside, Sand City, Monterey and Del Rey Oaks to the south and Marina to the north. Past practices at Fort Ord resulted in contaminated ground water, soil and sludges. Unexploded ordnance, munitions and explosives may also pose safety hazards. The U.S. Army began investigation and cleanup activities in 1986. EPA added Fort Ord to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. That same year, the U.S. Army signed a Federal Facility Agreement with EPA and the state to investigate and clean up the site. Although the U.S. Army is leading the cleanup across most of the site, the Fort Ord Reuse Authority is cleaning up about 3,500 acres of the site under a private cleanup effort. Parties have completed a number of cleanup actions and continue to carry out others. In 1991, the federal government selected Fort Ord for decommissioning and formally closed the post in 1994. Reuse at the former military base includes the California State University, Monterey Bay campus; a wetlands preserve; public golf courses; the local municipal airport; a Veterans Transition Center; and Fort Ord Dunes State Park. Local residents are also using other portions of the site for mountain biking, hiking, dog training, bird watching and youth education activities. The U.S. Army continues to operate an annex and reserve center, which provides a full set of support services for U.S. Army personnel, on a small portion of the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Fresno Municipal Sanitary Landfill
Site photo

The 145-acre Fresno Municipal Sanitary Landfill Superfund site is located four miles southwest of Fresno in Fresno County, California. The City of Fresno began operating the landfill in 1935. While conducting tests in 1983, the California Department of Health Services found that methane gas and vinyl chloride had migrated from the landfill to the surrounding areas. These tests also found that contaminated ground water had migrated off site to several private residential wells located nearby. In 1984, the city installed wells around the edge of the landfill to monitor methane and ground water. The city also constructed landfill gas migration barriers on the east and west sides of the landfill to prevent methane from spreading off site to nearby homes. The city closed the landfill in 1989, the same year EPA added the landfill to the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1990 and 1991, the city removed contaminated landfill gas spreading from the site. Between 2000 and 2001, the city capped the landfill and constructed landfill gas control and surface water management systems. Between 1999 and 2001, the city constructed a ground water treatment facility. The systems continue to operate. In 2001, the city redeveloped part of the site into the Fresno Regional Sports Complex. The complex includes soccer and softball fields. The construction of the cleanup systems took place at the same time as the construction of the sports complex.
Updated 2/2013

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Frontier Fertilizer Alternative Energy
Site photo

The 8-acre Frontier Fertilizer Superfund site is located near the City of Davis in north-central California. Operations in the 1970s and 1980s consisted of pesticide and herbicide storage, mixing and delivery, resulting in contamination of site soils as well as ground water, the primary drinking water source in the area. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1994. Today, the site serves as a prime example of innovative green remediation and renewable energy at a Superfund site. For the first time nationwide, solar energy is providing all of the power for a Superfund ground water cleanup. EPA first installed solar panels at the site in 2007. The initial system partially offset the site ground water treatment system’s electrical power needs, but could not fully power the remedy. In 2010, $350,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds facilitated an expansion of the solar energy system, which now provides 100 percent of the power for the ground water treatment system. The new solar panels cover half an acre, resulting in a green cleanup method that generates plenty of solar energy and offsets non-renewable energy use. The installation of the solar panels and the starting of the new system resulted in a $15,000 reduction in the site’s overall annual energy costs and a reduction of more than 54 metric tons of annual carbon dioxide emissions. Heating of the source area, completed in October 2012, will accelerate the site’s estimated cleanup duration by about 120 years, reducing the time for ground water cleanup achievement from 150 years to 30 years. To further “green” the site, the project team is also evaluating options to reuse treated ground water for local irrigation needs.
Updated 2/2013

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George Air Force Base

The George Air Force Base Superfund site is a former U.S. Air Force Base that occupied over 5,000 acres in the Mojave Desert near Victorville, California, about 75 miles northeast of Los Angeles. The base opened in 1941 for tactical fighter operations and training for aircraft and maintenance personnel. Base operations resulted in contaminated soil and ground water. EPA listed the base as a Superfund site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. That same year, the U.S. Air Force signed an agreement with EPA and the state to investigate and clean up the site. The U.S. Air Force began cleanup in 1991and has since completed a number of cleanup activities. Some cleanup and monitoring activities continue. In 1988, the Base Realignment and Closure Commission recommended the realignment and closure of 145 military installations, including George Air Force Base. The base closed in 1992. Today, agencies and businesses are using most of the base property. The most prominent redevelopment projects at the former base include a $100 million Federal Bureau of Prisons complex and an international airport, known as the Southern California Logistics Airport.
Updated 2/2013

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Hewlett-Packard (620-640 Page Mill Road)

The Hewlett-Packard (620-640 PAGE MILL ROAD) Superfund site in Palo Alto, California, housed optoelectronic equipment manufacturing facilities on 10 acres from 1962 to 1986. In 1981, at least 300 gallons of waste solvents leaked from a buried storage tank. The company excavated the tank and about 100 cubic yards of contaminated soil in 1981 and transported the materials to a hazardous waste facility. Since 1982, the company has been pumping and treating contaminated ground water. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990, because of contaminated ground water and soil. Between 1987 and 1992, Hewlett-Packard excavated and disposed of about 11,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil from the site. Hewlett-Packard treated soil vapors from 1994 to 1997. Stanford University owns the primary site property. After stopping operations in 1986, Hewlett-Packard began redevelopment in 1992 with the construction of a new office building. Hewlett-Packard sold the building and associated land lease in May 2007. The current owner of the building and land lease is NOP Page Mill Road. A law firm currently occupies the building.
Updated 2/2013

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Industrial Waste Processing

The Industrial Waste Processing (IWP) Superfund site occupies 0.5 acre in the Town of Pinedale, California. From about 1967 to 1981, IWP operated a chemical reclamation facility for glycols and solder wastes on the site. From 1977 to 1983, IWP also distributed various chemical solvents for Ashland Oil. After 1983, IWP used the site for storage of chemicals and equipment. In 1988, EPA removed 19,000 gallons of hazardous liquids and 290 cubic yards of contaminated soils from the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990 after investigators found that contamination remained in the soil. In 1999, potentially responsible parties excavated and disposed of the contaminated soils, backfilled excavated areas with clean material, and conducted confirmation sampling. In 2001, the site owner sold the site to Pacific Tent & Awning, a manufacturer of fabric awnings and accessories, which then redeveloped the site. The site currently houses an 8,192-square-foot warehouse/office facility that covers about 80 percent of the site area. Asphalt, concrete and a limited amount of landscaping cover the rest of the site. EPA continues to monitor and evaluate the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Intel Corp. (Mountain View Plant)

The 2-acre Intel Corp. (Mountain View Plant) Superfund site is located in Mountain View, California. Intel manufactured semiconductors at the site from 1968 until 1981. The site is part of the Middlefield-Ellis-Whisman (MEW) Study Area, which also includes the Raytheon Company Superfund site, the Fairchild Semiconductor Corp. (Mountain View Plant) Superfund site, and portions of the former NAS Moffett Field Superfund site where MEW and Navy ground water contamination has mixed. In the 1960s and 1970s, several industrial companies involved in semiconductor, electronics, and other manufacturing and research contaminated area soil and ground water. Operations at the former NAS Moffett Field also resulted in ground water contamination. Between 1986 and 1991, EPA listed these four sites on the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1989, EPA issued a cleanup plan to address soil and ground water contamination across the MEW Study Area. Soil cleanup actions are complete. At the former Intel Corp. property, a pilot study has been conducted to test the use of bioremediation to clean up ground water. Efforts to address subsurface vapor intrusion into buildings are also underway. Cogenra Solar Inc., a developer of commercial-scale solar cogeneration projects, currently operates on the Intel Corp. site.
Updated 3/2013

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Intel Corp. (Santa Clara III)

The Intel Corp. (Santa Clara III) Superfund site is located in Santa Clara, California. Intel Corporation operated a plant on a 4-acre property to perform quality control of chemicals and to test microprocessors from 1976 until 2008. Regulators first detected ground water contamination at the site in 1982. Investigators never positively identified the source of the contamination. In 1985, Intel constructed and began operating a ground water treatment system to remove the contaminated ground water. In 1986, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) because of the threat posed by the ground water contamination to the ground water drinking water supply source for Santa Clara Valley residents. Under EPA’s approved cleanup plan, Intel continued to operate the ground water pump-and-treat system until 1994. EPA later approved a cleanup plan to allow ground water to naturally recover. Only a limited area of ground water contamination remains. Ground water monitoring continues. From 2008 to mid-2010, the site was unoccupied. Most recently, Vantage Data Centers purchased the property and redeveloped it as a data storage center.
Updated 2/2013

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Intel Magnetics
Site photo

The 3-acre Intel Magnetics Superfund site, commonly referred to as the Intel Magnetics/Micro Storage Corporation or IM/MSC site, is located in Santa Clara, California. The site is in an industrial area, formerly dominated by the electronics and semiconductor manufacturing industries. Past activities at the IM building and nearby MSC building resulted in shallow ground water contamination. Investigators identified two main but distinct sources of contamination: the IM facility underground waste-solvent storage tank and the chemical storage area at MSC. EPA added the IM site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. In 1988, EPA included the MSC site with the IM site as one combined Superfund site on the NPL. A ground water pump-and-treat system operated on the site from 1986 until 1995. Ground water monitoring continues. Ground water contamination has not affected the confined Santa Clara Valley Ground Water Basin. Microsemi RFI and Micro-Chem currently operate in the former IM and MSC buildings and use them for administration and high-tech related manufacturing.
Updated 2/2013

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Intersil Inc./Siemens Components

The Intersil Inc./Siemens Components Superfund site is located in Cupertino, California. Intersil, Inc. and Siemens Components manufactured semiconductors for several years on two nearby locations covering 15 acres. Investigations conducted in 1982 as part of the California Regional Water Quality Control Board's underground storage tank leak detection program found contaminants in soils on the site. The contamination may have resulted from localized spills and from leaking underground storage tanks and piping from the two companies. At the Siemens facility, operators used four underground tanks to store waste solvents. At the Intersil facility, possible sources of contamination included waste neutralization systems and concrete scrubber pit sumps. Intersil stopped manufacturing at the site in 1988. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Cleanup included activities included the removal and disposal of about 40 cubic yards of soil, installation of a soil vapor extraction and treatment system, and ground water treatment. The building on the former Intersil property was demolished in the 1990s and has been replaced by an unoccupied two-story commercial building. Kaiser Permanente now occupies the building on the former Siemens property and uses it as part of a medical facility. Ground water treatment continues. Monitoring of ground water and soil will continue to verify the contaminants remain within health-based levels.
Updated 2/2013

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J.H. Baxter & Co.
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The 205-acre J.H. Baxter & Co. Superfund site is located in the City of Weed in northern California, less than 40 miles south of the Oregon border. J.H. Baxter & Co. and Roseburg Forest Products each partially own the site. Various companies have operated at the site, conducting wood treatment and related activities continuously since 1937. Wood treating operations resulted in contaminated ground water, surface water, soil and sludges, and the contamination of a nearby creek. In 1986, potentially responsible parties (PRPs) installed a fence to limit site access. In 1989, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). PRPs began cleanup activities in the late 1990s. Although much of the cleanup is complete, ground water treatment and monitoring continues. J.H. Baxter & Co. continues to operate a wood treatment plant on the site. Roseburg Forest Products operates a lumber mill and veneer plant. Pacific States Treating also leases a portion of the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Jibboom Junkyard
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The 9-acre Jibboom Junkyard Superfund site is located in Sacramento, California along the Sacramento Riverfront. Associated Metals Company began using the site for metal salvaging operations in 1950. Salvaging operations stopped in 1965, the same year the California Department of Transportation purchased the property to construct an elevated freeway. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. From 1985 until 1987, cleanup crews excavated and disposed of over 11,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil from the most highly contaminated areas, replacing the excavated areas with clean fill. Interstate 5 covers the remaining 6.7 acres of the site. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1991. The portion of the site between the elevated freeway and the Sacramento River now houses the Robert T. Matsui Waterfront Park. The city began designing the current park in the 1990s, noting the site’s aesthetic potential and convenient central location along the Sacramento River Parkway bicycle trail. Major development plans in the mid-2000s called for residential development in the nearby former Sacramento Railyards with various improvements at and around the park on the site. EPA conducted a Five-Year Review in 2007 and concluded that the site’s remedy remained protective of human health and the environment for the expanded use of the site. The Department of Parks and Recreation added several more feet of clean soil to provide a better view over the Sacramento River levee and connected the park with a new water intake structure in the Sacramento River. This improved on the site remedy, while providing a destination attraction for neighborhood residents and region-wide bicyclists, runners and walkers. Crews are completing park construction in phases. The first phase is complete and includes an arc-shaped pedestrian walkway linking a fountain plaza to a smaller pedestrian overlook on a pier with interpretive signage. The park has an open green space area, planted with native grasses, trees and vegetation for picnicking and viewing the river. The bicycle path next to the site receives regular bicycling commuting traffic during the week as well as recreational use year-round. State agencies are leading oversight of development at an adjacent property that also had cleanup issues. In 2012, the state approved the City of Sacramento’s design plans for a Powerhouse Science Center. This will include a large group picnic area with shading structures, picnic tables, community grilling area and a parking lot.
Updated 2/2013

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Lorentz Barrel & Drum Co.

The 7-acre Lorentz Barrel & Drum Co. Superfund site is located in San Jose, California. The site includes a former drum recycling facility that operated from 1947 until its closing in 1987. During that time, the facility accepted over 2 million drums from more than 3,000 parties. The facility emptied, cleaned, resealed, repainted and resold the used drums, which typically contained residues of solvents, acids and caustic chemicals. Contamination of soils, ground water and a nearby creek resulted from the improper handling of wastes in the drums and those generated during the recycling process. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Since that time, the site has been the focus of major removal actions and cleanup activities. Cleanup activities have included excavating and removing remaining drums and contaminated soils, installing a cap over the property, and installing a ground water treatment and monitoring system. Property owners routinely inspect and maintain the cap. Ground water treatment continues. Numerous auto dealers use a large portion of the site for fenced parking. A paper recycling company, Newark Recovery and Recycling, operates on the remaining portion of the site.
Updated 2/2013

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McColl
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The McColl Superfund site is located in Fullerton, California, about 20 miles southwest of Los Angeles. Once home to an open pit of acidic sludge, the site now hosts inviting green grass and sand traps for local golfers. From 1942 to 1946, oil companies dumped refinery waste into 12 on-site pits. The waste seeped into the soil and ground water, creating a hazard for the neighbors. In 1983, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). Between 1996 and 1997, potentially responsible parties (PRPs) covered the pits, placed a multi-layered cap on top, and installed a gas collection system and ground water equipment for monitoring. Through a series of public and community technical advisory group meetings, the community informed EPA of its desire to fold the McColl property into a neighboring golf course. EPA, the community, Orange County and the owners of Los Coyotes Country Club worked successfully to transform this property into three championship holes of golf. The site is now located entirely within the boundaries of the Los Coyotes Country Club. The portion of the golf course built over the site opened in 1998. Routine site operation and maintenance activities continue.
Updated 2/2013

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Moffett Field Naval Air Station
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The Moffett Field Naval Air Station (NAS) Superfund site is located 35 miles south of San Francisco, California, near San Francisco Bay. Portions of Moffett Field, including a federal research center and Hangar 1, fall within the Middlefield-Ellis-Whisman (MEW) Study Area – a large area of ground water contamination, which also includes three Superfund sites in Mountain View. Commissioned in 1933, the air station eventually became the largest naval air transport base on the west coast. From the end of World War II until its closure, Moffett Field hosted the development and use of several generations of land-based, anti-submarine warfare and maritime patrol aircraft. Naval operations involved the on-site disposal of solvents and sludges into ponds and landfills and directly onto the ground. Because of soil and ground water contamination, EPA listed the station on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. The U.S. Navy signed a Federal Facility Agreement with EPA and the state in 1990 to investigate and cleanup the site. Cleanup actions and monitoring continue. On July 1, 1994, the federal government closed NAS Moffett Field and turned over the facility to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center. The Housing Areas were transferred to the U.S. Air Force, and then to the U.S. Army. The Army is the current property owner of the Wescoat Housing Area and former Orion Park Housing Area. The Wescoat Housing Area has been redeveloped with new homes (Wescoat Village) and 30 acres of the former 77-acre Orion Park Area has been redeveloped with a new Armed Forces Reserve Center, which includes the U.S. Army Reserve 63rd Regional Support Command Headquarters building and associated support facilities. Currently, NASA Ames Research Center, an airfield, and a large master-planned redevelopment area known as NASA Research Park, are located on the former NAS Moffett Field. NASA has also tenant agreements with a number of entities that occupy a number of buildings. NASA is developing NASA Research Park as part of a public-private partnership. One outcome of this effort is a new residential area. Other uses planned for NASA Research Park include educational, office, and research and development facilities, a museum, a conference center, and retail spaces. NASA Ames Research Center also has plans to redevelop unimproved land at Moffett Field into sustainable research facilities that will include office, recreational and living spaces. Although some former airfield buildings have been demolished, historic structures will be preserved.
Updated 2/2013

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National Semiconductor Corp.

Starting in 1967, National Semiconductor Corp. manufactured electronic equipment at this 60-acre Superfund site in Santa Clara, California. Site investigations, which began in 1982, identified volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in area soil and ground water. The site consists of 14 separate sources of contamination. Likely sources of the contaminated ground water and soil included underground storage tanks, sumps and pipes. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. National Semiconductor Corp. has since taken leaking tanks out of service, instituted a program of pumping and treating the ground water, and removed contaminated soil from selected areas of the facility. National Semiconductor Corp. maintains ownership of the property, but manufacturing activities have ceased. The company currently uses the facility as offices, laboratories and support services.
Updated 2/2013

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Newmark Ground Water Contamination
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The Newmark Ground Water Contamination Superfund site is located in San Bernardino, California. The site includes two large areas of ground water contamination (plumes) as well as the source area. The contaminants of concern are volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Newmark Plume is located on the east side of the site and extends for 5 miles. The Muscoy Plume is located on the west side of the site and extends 4 miles. These ground water plumes are several hundred feet deep, and have not impacted city development. Land uses above the two plumes include light industrial, commercial and residential. Land use within the source area is primarily industrial and commercial, although portions include residential development. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989 after the state identified the two large plumes. The ground water treatment system for the Newmark Plume began operating in 1998. The ground water treatment system for the Muscoy Plume began operating in 2005. Both systems continue to operate. EPA is continuing to identify sources of contamination and develop a comprehensive cleanup plan for the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Norton Air Force Base (Landfill #2)

The Norton Air Force Base (Lndfll #2) Superfund site is a former U.S. Air Force Base located about 65 miles east of Los Angeles, California. The base began operating in 1942 and served as a major overhaul center for jet engines and the general repair of aircraft. Past practices resulted in the contamination of soil, sludges and ground water. Contaminated ground water also affected several public drinking water wells. In 1987, EPA listed the base as a Superfund site on the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1989, the U.S. Air Force, EPA and the state signed a Federal Facility Agreement to ensure the parties would investigate the site and take appropriate cleanup action. The U.S. Air Force first focused on specific contaminated areas and then began addressing the entire site. The U.S. Air Force has completed all cleanup actions but continues to monitor and maintain a landfill (Landfill 2) and monitor site ground water. In 1989, the federal government identified Norton Air Force Base as one of several military bases for closure. Norton Air Force Base officially closed in 1994. Since that time, the U.S. Air Force Real Property Agency has transferred base property to local entities for reuse and development purposes. The property now supports San Bernardino International Airport; aircraft maintenance, cargo handling and warehousing facilities; and an office park development. The Inland Valley Development Agency and San Bernardino International Airport Authority are joint powers authorities that act as the local reuse agency for redevelopment. In addition to the airport facilities, most of the remaining property supports large warehouse distribution centers used by corporations such as Stater Brothers, Mattel and PEP Boys.
Updated 2/2013

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Pemaco Maywood Alternative Energy
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The 4-acre Pemaco Maywood Superfund site is located along the Los Angeles River in Maywood, California. The site operated as a chemical mixing facility from the 1940s until 1991, when the facility closed. In 1993, a fired destroyed the facility. EPA then undertook a series of actions to stabilize the site. Follow-up EPA investigations confirmed the presence of hazardous chemicals in soil and ground water. As a result, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1999 and then began implementing long-term cleanup actions. EPA completed treatment of site soils with high contaminant concentrations using a method known as electrical resistive heating in 2008. A carbon-based treatment system for soil vapors and ground water continues to operate, and a solar powered energy system provides supplemental energy to the treatment plant. The 3.4-kilowatt-hour solar energy system produces about 5,600 kilowatt hours annually, offsetting about 3.3 tons of carbon dioxide emissions each year. EPA estimates it will take two to five years to recover the cost for the solar powered energy system. The City of Maywood, together with the Trust for Public Land, incorporated the site into a community park as part of the Los Angeles River Greenway project. Maywood Riverfront Park opened in May 2008 and offers athletic and recreational facilities to a heavily populated urban area.
Updated 2/2013

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Ralph Gray Trucking Co.

The Ralph Gray Trucking Co. Superfund site is located in a 23-acre residential neighborhood of Westminster, Orange County, California. During the 1930s, the site was the Murdy Dairy Farm. Beginning in 1936, Ralph Gray collected acid sludge, oil field wastes and oil refinery wastes and disposed of them in four unlined pits at the farm. Ralph Gray abandoned the disposal pits in the late 1930s and the pits remained undisturbed until the construction of 75 homes in the late 1950s. At that point, the development company buried hazardous substances from the pits in two unlined trenches cut through the backyard areas of about 25 of the lots before building the homes. After repeated complaints from residents when black sludge and seep material appeared in their yards, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1992. EPA removal actions included razing and restoration of backyard improvements, such as house additions, swimming pools, decks, landscaping and other structures. Cleanup and restoration contractors razed and reconstructed several houses built directly above waste deposits. The contractors removed visible material and excavated at least five additional feet into the clean soil. After the excavation work, EPA restored affected yards and structures. EPA also provided financial compensation to owners of homes demolished as part of the cleanup effort so that owners could rebuild or replace their homes. EPA completed all restoration work 1997. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2004.
Updated 2/2013

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Raytheon Corp.
Site photo

The Raytheon Corp. Superfund site is located in Mountain View, California. Raytheon formerly manufactured semiconductors on a 30-acre property. The site is part of the Middlefield-Ellis-Whisman (MEW) Study Area, which also includes the Fairchild Semiconductor Corp. (Mountain View Plant) site, the Intel Corp. – Mountain View Superfund site, and portions of the former NAS Moffett Field Superfund site where MEW and Navy ground water contamination has mixed. In the 1960s and 1970s, several industrial companies involved in semiconductor, electronics, and other manufacturing and research contaminated area soil and ground water. Operations at the former NAS Moffett Field also resulted in ground water contamination. Between 1986 and 1991, EPA listed these four sites on the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1989, EPA issued a cleanup plan to address soil and ground water contamination across the MEW Study Area. Soil cleanup actions are complete. Ground water treatment and monitoring continue. Efforts to address subsurface vapor intrusion into buildings are also underway. The headquarters for Symantec is now located at the Raytheon property.
Updated 3/2013

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Riverbank Army Ammunition Plant

The 173-acre Riverbank Army Ammunition Plant (RBAAP) facility is located in Riverbank, California and is comprised of large production buildings with numerous support buildings. Aluminum Company of America (ALCOA) originally constructed the RBAAP as an aluminum reduction plant supplying the military. In 1951, the plant was converted to a government-owned, contractor-operated installation to produce steel cartridge cases until 2009. Decades of industrial activities resulted in contamination of site ground water, sediment and soil. Contaminants include heavy metals, chromium and cyanide. Investigations also discovered the contamination of on-site treatment pond sediment. In 1989, the U.S. Army supplied nearby residents with bottled water after the discovery of chromium in off-site domestic water wells. The U.S. Army supplied an alternative water supply to residents until the public water system was extended west of the RBAAP. Currently residents do not use the ground water for drinking. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. In 1993, the U.S. Army removed contaminated sediments from its industrial waste treatment ponds and disposed of the sediments off-site. The Army’s 1994 cleanup plan involved pumping and treating ground water and the stabilization, capping and monitoring of the on-site landfill. Placed on the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) list in 2005, the site is undergoing closure and transfer to the City of Riverbank Local Redevelopment Authority. The general land use designation of the RBAAP is presently industrial. Private businesses currently lease various buildings at the facility for a variety of light to heavy industrial activities. Based on the available infrastructure and other property improvements, it appears likely that the future use of existing buildings will be light to heavy industrial and offices.
Updated 3/2013

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Sacramento Army Depot

The Sacramento Army Depot is a 485-acre former military base located seven miles southeast of downtown Sacramento, California. The depot served as a U.S. Army support facility, specializing in electro-optics equipment repair; emergency manufacturing of parts; and metal plating, treatment and painting. From 1947 to 1972, workers incinerated paint sludges, oil, grease, trash, solvents and other industrial wastes in on-site burn pits and disposed of materials in a 1,000-gallon underground storage tank. Waste management operations contaminated ground water and surface soils. In 1986, the U.S. Army removed the underground storage tank. In 1987, EPA listed the depot as a Superfund site on the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1988, the U.S. Army signed an agreement with EPA and the state to investigate and clean up the site. The depot officially closed in 1995. The U.S. Army completed soil cleanup in 1998 and began treating ground water by 2003. Site operation and maintenance activities continue, including long-term treatment of ground water. In 2000, a private company began transforming the depot into a business park, including renovation of all buildings. Known today as Depot Park, the business park is home to a variety of companies and organizations that provide numerous jobs and improve the local economy. Examples of tenants include Airco Mechanical, Recology, Balanced Body, Total Service Logistics, Habitat for Humanity and Salon Guys.
Updated 3/2013

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San Fernando Valley (Area 1)

The San Fernando Valley (Area 1) Superfund site (SFV Area 1) is one of four Superfund sites located in the eastern portion of California’s San Fernando Valley that EPA added to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. The San Fernando Valley ground water basin provides drinking water to over 800,000 residents of the cities of Los Angeles, Burbank and Glendale, and the La Crescenta Water District. Contamination of area ground water resulted from a range of industrial operations. SFV Area 1 covers an area about 20 square miles and includes the areas of North Hollywood, Sunland, and Burbank. SFV Area 1 is located in a heavily developed urban area that includes a mix of residential, commercial and industrial land uses. EPA oversees the cleanup of various mixed and distinct areas of ground water contamination, contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and metals, located throughout the footprint of the site. EPA has overseen the operation of two ground water pump-and-treat systems in the North Hollywood and Burbank areas since 1989 and 1996 respectively.
Updated 2/2013

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San Fernando Valley (Area 2)

The San Fernando Valley Area 2 Superfund site (SFV Area 2) is one of four Superfund sites located in the eastern portion of California’s San Fernando Valley that EPA added to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. The San Fernando Valley ground water basin provides drinking water to over 800,000 residents within the cities of Los Angeles, Burbank and Glendale, and the La Crescenta Water District. Contamination to area ground water resulted from a range of industrial operations. SFV Area 2 comprises an area of contaminated ground water covering about 6,680 acres near the Crystal Springs Well Field in the cities of Los Angeles and Glendale. The site supports industrial, residential, recreational and commercial land uses. A ground water pump-and-treat system to address ground water contamination in the area began operating under EPA oversight in 2000. EPA is working with the state to identify and clean up sources of volatile organic compound (VOC) and chromium contamination.
Updated 2/2013

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San Fernando Valley (Area 3)

The San Fernando Valley (Area 3) Superfund site (SFV Area 3) is a delisted Superfund site. SFV Area 3 is one of four San Fernando Valley Superfund sites that EPA added to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. SFV Area 3 is located in a basin that is hydrologically separate from the other three San Fernando Valley sites. Located in the Verdugo basin east of the Verdugo Mountains, the site covers an area of about 4,400 acres. Land use in the Verdugo Basin is primarily residential along the floor of the valley and undeveloped (open space) in surrounding mountains. A strip of commercial development is present along Foothill Boulevard, and a Y-shaped commercial sector is present in the southern portion of the basin. The basin also contains four scattered agricultural areas. The Verdugo basin supplies water to an unincorporated area of Los Angeles County known locally as La Crescenta. La Crescenta Water District is responsible for supplying water to residents of the area. After reviewing results of ground water monitoring conducted from the 1980s until 2002, EPA, with support from the state, determined that Superfund cleanup actions at the site were not necessary. EPA issued a No Further Action Record of Decision (ROD) in 2004 and deleted the site from the NPL.
Updated 2/2013

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San Fernando Valley (Area 4) Green Infrastructure

The San Fernando Valley (Area 4) Superfund site (SFV Area 4) is one of four Superfund sites located in the eastern portion of California’s San Fernando Valley that EPA added to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. The San Fernando Valley ground water basin provides drinking water to over 800,000 residents of the cities of Los Angeles, Burbank and Glendale, and the La Crescenta Water District. Contamination to area ground water resulted from a range of industrial operations. SFV Area 4 is an area of contaminated ground water covering about 5,860 acres near the Pollock Well Field in Los Angeles. SFV Area 4 is located at the southern end of the San Fernando Valley aquifer in the Los Angeles Narrows area. SFV Area 4 is within a heavily developed urban area that includes a mix of residential, commercial and industrial land uses. The Los Angeles River and Metrolink (commuter train) service yard are major features of the area. EPA completed an interim investigation of the Pollock Well Field in April 1994 and concluded that selecting and implementing a Superfund cleanup approach for the Pollock Area was not necessary because the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power designed and built a volatile organic compound (VOC) treatment facility. The Pollock Treatment Plant became operational in 1999. EPA plans to evaluate the effectiveness of the Pollock Well Field project as part of its ongoing basin-wide studies, and determine the need for additional actions.
Updated 2/2013

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San Gabriel Valley (Area 1) Green Infrastructure
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The San Gabriel Valley (Area 1) Superfund site is one of four nearby Superfund sites in Southern California. The San Gabriel Valley Superfund sites include multiple areas of contaminated ground water in the 170-square-mile San Gabriel Valley. In 1984, EPA listed the four main areas of ground water contamination in the valley as Superfund sites on the National Priorities List (NPL). The Area 1 site includes about 10 square miles of ground water contamination underlying portions of the cities of El Monte, Rosemead and Temple City; about 8 square miles of ground water contamination underlying portions of the cities of South El Monte, El Monte and Rosemead; and about 4 square miles of ground water contamination in the southernmost part of San Gabriel Valley. In addition to industrial, commercial, residential and open space land uses, portions of the site support recreational uses and flood control. EPA has overseen treatment of ground water in Area 1 since the early 2000s. EPA is overseeing the construction of additional ground water treatment systems. Investigations and studies are also underway, including an effort to identify the sources of contamination. To date, investigators have found soil contamination at nearly 400 individual facilities. Water utilities in the area provide clean water that meets all state and federal drinking water standards.
Updated 2/2013

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San Gabriel Valley (Area 2)
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The San Gabriel Valley (Area 2) Superfund site is one of four nearby Superfund sites in Southern California. The San Gabriel Valley Superfund sites include multiple areas of contaminated ground water in the 170-square-mile San Gabriel Valley. In 1984, EPA listed the four main areas of ground water contamination in the valley as Superfund sites on the National Priorities List (NPL). The Area 2 site (also known as the Baldwin Park Operable Unit) includes ground water contamination underlying portions of the cities of Azusa, Irwindale, Baldwin Park, West Covina, La Puente and Industry. The site covers about 10 square miles. Land use at the site is largely suburban, with a mix of residential, commercial and industrial development. The site’s cleanup includes the operation of four large ground water pump-and-treat systems. Ground water treatment began in 2002. Water utilities in the area provide clean water that meets all state and federal drinking water standards.
Updated 2/2013

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San Gabriel Valley (Area 3)

The San Gabriel Valley (Area 3) Superfund site is one of four nearby Superfund sites in Southern California. The San Gabriel Valley Superfund sites include multiple areas of contaminated ground water in the 170-square-mile San Gabriel Valley. In 1984, EPA listed the four main areas of ground water contamination in the valley as Superfund sites on the National Priorities List (NPL). The Area 3 site covers 19 square miles containing regions of ground water contamination in Los Angeles County, California. Cities within Area 3 include Alhambra, Rosemead, San Gabriel, San Marino, South Pasadena and Temple City. Land use within the site is mainly commercial and residential, with limited areas of light industry and open space. EPA is preparing a feasibility study and expects to issue a proposed plan that identifies the Agency’s preferred cleanup option for the site in 2014. Water utilities in the area provide clean water that meets all state and federal drinking water standards.
Updated 2/2013

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San Gabriel Valley (Area 4)

The San Gabriel Valley (Area 4) Superfund site is one of four nearby Superfund sites in Southern California. The San Gabriel Valley Superfund sites include multiple areas of contaminated ground water in the 170-square-mile San Gabriel Valley. In 1984, EPA listed the four main areas of ground water contamination in the valley as Superfund sites on the National Priorities List (NPL). The sites include industrial, commercial and residential land uses, as well as undeveloped areas. The Area 4 site (also known as the Puente Valley Operable Unit), is a 23-square mile sub-basin of the Main San Gabriel Basin. The site is located primarily within the City of Industry, in the City of La Puente, and in unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County. The majority of land in the Puente Valley supports commercial and industrial purposes; a small portion supports residential uses. EPA has planned three ground water pump-and-treat systems to protect the water supply in the “mouth of the valley” portion of the Puente Valley and prevent further contaminant movement. Construction of the systems began in 2006. The completion of these systems has been delayed to allow for additional study of alternative end use options of treated ground water. EPA anticipates the cleanup system will be in place in 2015. Water utilities in the area provide clean water that meets all state and federal drinking water standards.
Updated 2/2013

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Sharpe Army Depot

The 724-acre Sharpe Army Depot Superfund site is a Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) distribution facility located in Lathrop, California, 65 miles south of Sacramento. Agencies also refer to the site as the Defense Distribution Depot San Joaquin California, Sharpe site or DDJC-Sharpe. The installation opened in 1941. The construction of major facilities at the installation began during World War II and continued into the post-war period. In the 2000s, the DLA also constructed two large warehouse facilities and made various improvements. For most of its existence, the installation supported both supply and maintenance missions. The supply mission remains active today; it includes storage, handling, preservation, packaging and shipment of general supplies and equipment. Between 1941 and 1975, maintenance of aircraft, vehicles, industrial equipment and medical equipment resulted in the generation of a variety of chemical wastes. Site operators disposed of these wastes in multiple locations. Investigations identifying contamination at the installation began in the 1980s. In 1987, EPA listed the installation as a Superfund site on the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1989, the U.S. Army, EPA and the state signed a Federal Facility Agreement to ensure the parties would thoroughly investigate the site and take appropriate cleanup action. The U.S. Army began cleanup actions in 1987. Soil cleanup is nearly complete. Ground water treatment continues.
Updated 2/2013

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Sola Optical USA, Inc.
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The 35-acre Sola Optical USA, Inc. (Sola) Superfund site is located in Petaluma, California, about 30 miles north of San Francisco. Sola Optical manufactured ophthalmic lenses at the site from 1978 through 2001. The facility included one manufacturing building and an adjoining administration office building. In 1982, the state identified acetone in an on-site well. Later, Sola Optical reported contaminated soil next to six underground solvent storage tanks at the facility. In 1985, Sola Optical removed the underground storage tanks and surrounding soil and confirmed the existence of contamination in shallow ground water underneath the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Sola Optical treated ground water at the site from 1988 to 1997. In 2007, EPA agreed to allow the ground water to recover naturally. In 2012, EPA confirmed that the ground water had achieved the cleanup standards. EPA is now working to remove the site from the NPL. In 2000, RNM Cader, L.L.C., purchased about 11 previously undeveloped acres in the southwest portion of the site for development. Between 2005 and 2010, RNM Cader constructed an asphalt parking lot and four building pads. The owner of the remaining 24 acres of the Sola Optical property sold the property and buildings to Kland, LLC in 2002. Buildings on the site facility parcel include the original manufacturing building, an administration office building and a parking lot. Two commercial tenants currently occupy the site building: Petaluma Poultry (administrative office) and Reynolds Packaging. Petaluma Poultry conducts sales and distribution of poultry. Reynolds Packaging conducts storage and distribution of food packaging materials.
Updated 2/2013

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South Bay Asbestos Area Green Infrastructure
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The 550-acre South Bay Asbestos Area Superfund site is located on the southern edge of San Francisco Bay in San Jose, California. The site includes the entire 550-acre community of Alviso, where about 2,100 residents live. Specific land uses include residential housing, schools, small markets, restaurants, retail businesses, a hotel and recreational areas including basketball and volleyball courts. Portions of the site served as dumping areas for over 30 years. Three landfills located within the site boundaries received asbestos wastes from an asbestos-cement pipe manufacturing plant located 4 miles south of the site. The plant operated from 1953 until 1982. Residents reportedly used waste asbestos pipe to drain excess water from their properties before installing curbs and gutters. Parties may have filled in several areas with asbestos-containing soils transported in by residents to raise the elevation of their property and to improve flood protection. Investigators also identified asbestos in the Guadalupe River levee, the ring levee (a levee that surrounded Alviso), and in surface soils around the town. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Parties undertook initial cleanup actions in the 1980s and early 1990s, and long-term cleanup actions in the 1990s. Cleanup actions have included paving asbestos-contaminated lots, removing asbestos debris, installing landfill covers, and implementing land use restrictions. Cleanup actions also included removing the ring levee – the largest source of asbestos-containing material within the site – and restoring previously existing wetlands underlying the levee. Operation and maintenance activities as well as monthly wet sweeping of Alviso streets continue. In the 2000s, parties successfully built commercial office centers on two of the landfill areas located within the site: Bixby Technology Center (formerly Legacy Tech Park) and Legacy America Center. The developers of the landfill areas signed Prospective Purchaser Agreements with EPA, which limited the developers’ liability for pre-existing contamination. Parties have completed all cleanup actions at the site. EPA plans to issue the Final Close-Out Report and delist the site from the NPL in 2013.
Updated 2/2013

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Spectra-Physics, Inc.

The 11.5-acre Spectra-Physics, Inc. Superfund site is located in Mountain View, California, just east of San Jose. The Teledyne Semiconductor, Inc. Superfund site borders the Spectra-Physics, Inc. site. Contaminated ground water from both sites merged and the successors to Teledyne Semiconductor and Spectra-Physics are jointly managing cleanup of the site. The Spectra-Physics, Inc. site has been the location of a manufacturer of electronic equipment and gas lasers since 1961. The operation uses a variety of cleaners, degreasers and lubricants in the manufacturing process. Wastes from these processes include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), paints, oils, acids and bases. In 1981, the state discovered hazardous waste stored in areas without dikes or leachate collection systems. Additionally, several on-site wastewater sumps may have contributed to contaminated soil and ground water. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1991. EPA’s approved cleanup plan for the site called for removing vapors from soil and pumping and treating ground water. The potentially responsible parties completed the soil cleanup in 1995. Ground water treatment continues. In addition to ongoing manufacturing activities, one building at the Spectra-Physics, Inc. site is now a church.
Updated 2/2013

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Synertek, Inc. (Building 1)

The 1.5-acre Synertek, Inc. (Building 1) Superfund site is located in Santa Clara, California, in the area known as Silicon Valley. The property consists of a low rise building and landscaping and parking areas. Synertek used the on-property building constructed in 1974 for performing quality control of chemicals and electrical testing of semiconductors beginning in 1978. Honeywell Inc. acquired Synertek as a wholly owned subsidiary in 1979. Synertek manufactured semiconductor products in the building from March 1978 to February 1985. Historical operations at the site included the use of a 200-gallon solvent tank and three neutralization tanks. After the removal of these tanks and surrounding soil in 1985, investigators discovered contamination of on-site and off-site ground water. Honeywell installed three on-site and two off-site ground water extraction wells with an air stripping tower to treat the extracted ground water. In 1989, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) because of the potential threat to the Santa Clara Valley ground water basin. Ground water extraction continued until 2001. Since then, EPA has allowed the ground water to recover naturally. Private property owners currently lease the building to Crystal Solar. Crystal Solar uses the southern two-thirds of the building (about 16,000 square feet) as office space and for research and development of solar panels. In addition, Crystal Solar is expanding and the remaining northern third of the building is under construction.
Updated 2/2013

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Teledyne Semiconductor

The one-acre Teledyne Semiconductor Superfund site has housed a semiconductor manufacturing facility since 1962. The site is located next to the Spectra-Physics, Inc. Superfund site in a densely populated area of Mountain View, California, northwest of Santa Clara. Past operations at the Teledyne Semiconductor site resulted in ground water contamination. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. The potentially responsible parties for both sites began cleanup actions in the mid-1980s and early 1990s. Ground water treatment continues. Buildings on the Teledyne Semiconductor Superfund site remain in use for light industrial activities. BD Biosciences Clontech and Microchip Technology Inc. occupy the single building that Teledyne Semiconductor previously used.
Updated 2/2013

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Tracy Defense Depot (USARMY)
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The 448-acre Tracy Defense Depot (U.S. Army) Superfund site is located in San Joaquin County, in central California. Since 1942, the Tracy Defense Depot served as a weapons supply facility for the U.S. Army. In 1963, operating authority of the facility transferred to the U.S. Defense Logistics Agency. Industrial activities performed on site used chemical substances, including pesticides, paints and photo processing chemicals. Site operators disposed of these substances into unlined sewage ponds and underground tanks. The U.S. Army burned hazardous materials on site, including radioactive materials, fuel, medical supplies and chemicals. The substances buried, burned and dumped on site began sinking into the soil. Eventually, these substances polluted the ground water supply. The site became the subject of various environmental studies starting in 1980, when operators first found contaminants in soil and ground water samples. About 28,600 people receive drinking water from a facility that blends water from well fields near the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in August 1990. EPA and the U.S. Department of Defense then began an investigation to identify a proper cleanup plan. In the process, the agencies found over 30 contamination source areas on site. Cleanup activities include installing and operating a ground water treatment system, monitoring ground water quality, removing leaking tanks, and excavating contaminated soil. The ground water treatment system has reduced health risks from contaminants at the site, but cleanup work continues. The U.S. Army still owns the facility and continues to use it as a storage and distribution center for military supplies and weapons.
Updated 10/2013

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Treasure Island Naval Station - Hunters Point Annex
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The Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (also known as Treasure Island Naval Station-Hunters Point Annex) Superfund site is located in southeastern San Francisco, California. The site sits on a peninsula that extends into San Francisco Bay. The site covers 936 acres: 496 on land and 440 under the bay. Hunters Point was originally the site of a private, commercial dry dock facility beginning in 1869. In 1940, the U.S. Navy obtained ownership of the shipyard for shipbuilding, repair and maintenance activities. In addition to serving as a repair facility, the Naval Radiological Defense Laboratory (NRDL) operated at the site from 1948 to 1969. At the height of operations, the shipyard employed about 8,000 civilian workers. In 1974, the U.S. Navy ceased its operations at the shipyard. From 1976 until 1986, the U.S. Navy leased the area to a ship repair company. During environmental investigations in 1987, investigators identified contamination throughout the site’s surface and ground water. This contamination posed a potential risk to the local community and environment. As a result, in 1989, EPA listed the shipyard as a Superfund site on the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1991, Congress officially designated the installation for closure under the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) program. In 1992, EPA, the U.S. Navy and the state signed a Federal Facilities Agreement to better coordinate environmental investigation, cleanup and reuse at the site. As part this effort, the U.S. Navy divided the installation into six parcels. Since 1992, the U.S. Navy has undertaken numerous site investigations and cleanup actions. In 1993, the City of San Francisco designated the site as a redevelopment area. Congress then authorized the U.S. Department of Defense to transfer the site to the city under special terms. A few tenants remain onsite while the cleanup work continues. The San Francisco Police Department has its crime lab in one large building and several other buildings have been home to a large community of artists since the late 1980s. The city adopted the Hunters Point Naval Shipyard Redevelopment Plan in 1997 and amended the plan in 2010. The U.S. Navy transfers various portions of the site to the city following cleanup. The U.S. Navy transferred the first site parcel in 2004. The site’s master developer began infrastructure development on the first transferred parcel in 2006 but new home construction has not yet begun. The city’s plan for the site calls for a large-scale mixed-use (e.g. residential, recreational, and commercial) development based on principles of sustainability. In 2012, the U.S. Green Building Council awarded the redevelopment project a Neighborhood Development Gold certification.
Updated 2/2013

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United Heckathorn Co.
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The United Heckathorn Superfund site is located on Richmond Harbor on the east side of San Francisco Bay in Contra Costa County, California. The industrial area is dominated by active petroleum and shipping terminals. The site includes 5 acres of land (the upland area) and about 15 acres of marine sediments in two channels (Lauritzen and Parr) of Richmond Harbor. From 1947 through 1966, several companies used the site to formulate, package and ship pesticides. The Levin-Richmond Terminal Corporation purchased the upland area in 1981. In 1980, the state detected chlorinated pesticides and metals in soil samples. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Cleanup at the site took place from 1990 through 1999. Activities included excavation of heavily contaminated areas, dredging of Lauritzen Channel and Parr Canal, and construction of a cap over 5 acres of the site. Post-remediation monitoring found that unacceptably high levels of pesticides remain in Lauritzen Channel. Investigations to determine the source and extent of remaining contamination as well as additional cleanup actions are underway. Levin Richmond Terminal Corporation (LRTC) still owns the upland area. The company mainly uses the upland area (now capped) for cargo stockpiling and railroad operations. LRTC and Manson Construction, a dredging contractor located along the west shoreline of the Lauritzen Channel, continue to use Lauritzen Channel as a deep-water channel. Parr Canal is currently unused.
Updated 3/2013

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Western Pacific Railroad Co.

The 90-acre Western Pacific Railroad Co. (WPRR) Superfund site, located just outside of Oroville, California, began operating as a rail yard in the 1880s. Activities at the site included welding, painting, machining, fabricating and fueling locomotives. These activities occurred in a 10-acre area known as the Fueling Area. Structures within the Fueling Area included a roundhouse and turntable, concrete inspection pits, a fueling area, aboveground storage tanks, drip pans and two oil water separators. In 1970, WPRR ceased its maintenance and repair activities and leased the Fueling Area to an independent railcar company, which performed similar activities until 1991. WPRR, and the subsequent owner, Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) Co., continued to use the fueling tracks and drip pans until 1991, when UPRR dismantled or demolished the remaining structures in the Fueling Area and backfilled the below-grade concrete features with clean fill. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990 because of contaminated on-site ground water. UPRR installed a ground water extraction and treatment system in 1994. In early 1997, UPRR installed a second ground water extraction well with a soil vapor extraction (SVE) system. By fall 1997, contaminant levels in the ground water had fallen below cleanup levels. UPRR removed contaminated soil from the Fueling Area in 1998. UPRR turned off the ground water extraction system in 1999 and the SVE system 2000. After determining that UPRR had met the site cleanup goals, EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2001. Currently, the Fueling Area is inactive, but the rest of the site has a maintenance shop, a small classification yard, and an active rail line. The land immediately east of the site is residential, with the rest of the surrounding area zoned for commercial and industrial use. UPRR leases a public drinking water well located on the site just west of the Fueling Area rail line to California Water Service.
Updated 3/2013

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Westinghouse Electric Corp. (Sunnyvale Plant)

The 75-acre Westinghouse Electric Corporation (Sunnyvale Plant) Superfund site is located in Sunnyvale, California. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation used the facility to manufacture electrical transformers. During this time, ground water contamination resulted from a leaking polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) storage tank and from localized spills on site. Site investigations also discovered fuel and volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination in area ground water and soil. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Cleanup activities included the removal or paving of contaminated areas and the extraction and treatment of contaminated ground water. In 1996, Northrop Grumman purchased the site. The company is a United States defense contractor that employs nearly 1,000 people who work at the facility.
Updated 2/2013

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